Jump to content


Photo

What Are People Using For A Web Site/presence For Sales?


  • Please log in to reply
32 replies to this topic

#1 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 02 October 2010 - 07:15 AM

I have been considering a web site for the last few years, and wondered what people were doing for their web sites, and what works for them. I am able to work with HTML, and Dreamweaver, but that is not so much the issue. I was wondering if people are using a web administrator to keep up, or using a site like Etsy or designing and putting it out on their own?

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#2 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,176 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 02 October 2010 - 09:03 AM

For years I struggled with dreamweaver until this past January when I finally got my "duh" moment.

I thought that surely someone must have written software to make this easy for people who just want a site,
don't want to mess with HTML ... and there it all was once I Googled it ... choices galore and as easy as
cut and paste and dragging images.

I have a Mac and for less than $100 I have a great site that I can update easily so as to keep it fresh
which is key to return visits. I transferred my old site to it and was up in under three hours with new content.
I used Karelia software called Sandvox but there are others.

Use your front page as an active news area, not a boring list of links.
Many people never look any further than page one so grab them there.

As to etsy ... It works, but it is hard work and you have to tend it every day. You can't just put stuff up and
hope for the best. There are also places where you can can tips on selling there ... google again.

Selling from your site is hard unless you have some way of directing people to your site.
The most successful are those who do shows or have a sales area in their studios where they can give
out cards so people can come back for more work. People won't just find you.

I will say this with no hesitation ... Websites are a must. They are the business card of today.
They are the baseline guide to the professionalism of the artist.
They are also the easiest way to send your own message, showcase your work.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#3 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 02 October 2010 - 09:55 AM

For years I struggled with dreamweaver until this past January when I finally got my "duh" moment.

I thought that surely someone must have written software to make this easy for people who just want a site,
don't want to mess with HTML ... and there it all was once I Googled it ... choices galore and as easy as
cut and paste and dragging images.

I have a Mac and for less than $100 I have a great site that I can update easily so as to keep it fresh
which is key to return visits. I transferred my old site to it and was up in under three hours with new content.
I used Karelia software called Sandvox but there are others.

Use your front page as an active news area, not a boring list of links.
Many people never look any further than page one so grab them there.

As to etsy ... It works, but it is hard work and you have to tend it every day. You can't just put stuff up and
hope for the best. There are also places where you can can tips on selling there ... google again.

Selling from your site is hard unless you have some way of directing people to your site.
The most successful are those who do shows or have a sales area in their studios where they can give
out cards so people can come back for more work. People won't just find you.

I will say this with no hesitation ... Websites are a must. They are the business card of today.
They are the baseline guide to the professionalism of the artist.
They are also the easiest way to send your own message, showcase your work.


Thanks for your reply. I am a retired art teacher, and used to teach computer animation in HS and digital presentation in college to graduate students. I have a decent background in computers because of it, but don't want to be spending a whole lot of time on creating a site. I also believe that any site I create will be content based, and am trying to get up some content and other things together along with the pottery sales. I have had a steady customer for the last 15 years that allows me to get some business cards out there that go both Nationally and Internationally, but have not done a show since the 90's when I did the Penn State festivals. Now that I have more time I intend to get back into making more pots, but don't want to be stuck into making penny ante to keep the hobby going. Besides it isn't just a hobby to me anymore.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#4 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 10:05 AM

I have been considering a web site for the last few years, and wondered what people were doing for their web sites, and what works for them. I am able to work with HTML, and Dreamweaver, but that is not so much the issue. I was wondering if people are using a web administrator to keep up, or using a site like Etsy or designing and putting it out on their own?


For me, the quickest, easiest way to get up a site that I manage alone with ease is http://otherpeoplespixels.com/. You can sell directly from the site with a simple Paypal cart. I am going to connect my site to my etsy site for a better cart (that lets me separate the price of a pot and the shipping charges). Hopefully, I'll add Etsy today but as of now, here is what I came up with in about 6 hours -- http://jimsandefur.com
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#5 icyone

icyone

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 65 posts

Posted 02 October 2010 - 09:32 PM

I love using wordpress and I use this theme (actually two themes as I use my store theme in a subfolder of my main blog) , it cost a bit but it is super easy. Had my sister who is non techy up and running her own site immediately.

Some host are a bit more friendly than others with the market theme but most host have a one click easy install of wordpress.

http://www.markettheme.com/

They have a live demo where you can actually add items to see how easy it i.

It uses paypal for payments. It also can use google checkout but it's not as easy to set up as it is designed mostly with paypal in mind as the payment processor.

As long as one has a business (or premier?) paypal account buyers can purchase with credit card or paypal accounts

#6 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,925 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 03 October 2010 - 10:37 AM

For years I struggled with dreamweaver until this past January when I finally got my "duh" moment.

I thought that surely someone must have written software to make this easy for people who just want a site,
don't want to mess with HTML ... and there it all was once I Googled it ... choices galore and as easy as
cut and paste and dragging images.

I have a Mac and for less than $100 I have a great site that I can update easily so as to keep it fresh
which is key to return visits. I transferred my old site to it and was up in under three hours with new content.
I used Karelia software called Sandvox but there are others.

Use your front page as an active news area, not a boring list of links.
Many people never look any further than page one so grab them there.

As to etsy ... It works, but it is hard work and you have to tend it every day. You can't just put stuff up and
hope for the best. There are also places where you can can tips on selling there ... google again.

Selling from your site is hard unless you have some way of directing people to your site.
The most successful are those who do shows or have a sales area in their studios where they can give
out cards so people can come back for more work. People won't just find you.

I will say this with no hesitation ... Websites are a must. They are the business card of today.
They are the baseline guide to the professionalism of the artist.
They are also the easiest way to send your own message, showcase your work.

Chris,
Did you use Sandvox or Sandvox Pro?
Marcia



#7 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,176 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 03 October 2010 - 11:53 AM

I used the Sandvox pro ... It was not that much more and had nice features.

Also, the Karelia support staff is great ... I have had to ask for help twice ...
they found the problem and I was back up quickly ...

I think I was most of the problem because I don't have patience with computers.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#8 Seasoned Warrior

Seasoned Warrior

    Businessman - Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 298 posts

Posted 03 October 2010 - 01:23 PM

I've been on the fence about a website for myself, I made sites for other people and I've used the Dreamweaver suite and a few other programs. Every once in a while I trot out a site for myself but its usually not very long-lived.I like Dreamweaver because of the way it's shows so many different actions. I like their Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and the way that you have the ability to duplicate items common to multiple pages by clicking on the sidebar. I've particularly liked their split screen between WYSIWYG and HTML so that you can see your actions immediately and if you don't like exactly what happened in WYSIWYG you can tweak it with HTML. I don't have a web page for Ceramics because I am not sure what the real return on investment is: I've never been able to connect a sale to a website visit. I've tried social networking, and I've tried blogging as well as tweeting and I just don't see a real response: perhaps it.s just me. I can't really sell my work online so the only uses for the site would be for information to prospective clients or to convince people to contact me and so far my best source of business is referrals and building professionals like Architects and designers. I try to keep my finger on the pulse of technology and it never ceases to amaze me, I even love technology for it's own sake (yes I'm somewhat of a techno-geek) but IO just haven't seen how I can get my investment in time back when there are other I can spend time doing that have a better return. It has been my experience that there is nothing that goes stale faster than a site that is not updated frequently,

Best regards,
Charles

#9 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 03 October 2010 - 02:24 PM

For years I struggled with dreamweaver until this past January when I finally got my "duh" moment.

I thought that surely someone must have written software to make this easy for people who just want a site,
don't want to mess with HTML ... and there it all was once I Googled it ... choices galore and as easy as
cut and paste and dragging images.

I have a Mac and for less than $100 I have a great site that I can update easily so as to keep it fresh
which is key to return visits. I transferred my old site to it and was up in under three hours with new content.
I used Karelia software called Sandvox but there are others.

Use your front page as an active news area, not a boring list of links.
Many people never look any further than page one so grab them there.

As to etsy ... It works, but it is hard work and you have to tend it every day. You can't just put stuff up and
hope for the best. There are also places where you can can tips on selling there ... google again.

Selling from your site is hard unless you have some way of directing people to your site.
The most successful are those who do shows or have a sales area in their studios where they can give
out cards so people can come back for more work. People won't just find you.

I will say this with no hesitation ... Websites are a must. They are the business card of today.
They are the baseline guide to the professionalism of the artist.
They are also the easiest way to send your own message, showcase your work.


Yeah, Sandvox is great software, well rated, and I have used it a few yrs back, but presently I am PC based.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#10 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 03 October 2010 - 02:28 PM

I've been on the fence about a website for myself, I made sites for other people and I've used the Dreamweaver suite and a few other programs. Every once in a while I trot out a site for myself but its usually not very long-lived.I like Dreamweaver because of the way it's shows so many different actions. I like their Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and the way that you have the ability to duplicate items common to multiple pages by clicking on the sidebar. I've particularly liked their split screen between WYSIWYG and HTML so that you can see your actions immediately and if you don't like exactly what happened in WYSIWYG you can tweak it with HTML. I don't have a web page for Ceramics because I am not sure what the real return on investment is: I've never been able to connect a sale to a website visit. I've tried social networking, and I've tried blogging as well as tweeting and I just don't see a real response: perhaps it.s just me. I can't really sell my work online so the only uses for the site would be for information to prospective clients or to convince people to contact me and so far my best source of business is referrals and building professionals like Architects and designers. I try to keep my finger on the pulse of technology and it never ceases to amaze me, I even love technology for it's own sake (yes I'm somewhat of a techno-geek) but IO just haven't seen how I can get my investment in time back when there are other I can spend time doing that have a better return. It has been my experience that there is nothing that goes stale faster than a site that is not updated frequently,

Best regards,
Charles


I have to agree with you on much you have to say here. I also am a bit of a techno-geek, and do like the Dreamweaver. I just think that it would take too much time to keep the site current with it. My work does have a niche market for some of it that would help on line sales, but at the same time I don't know as that would support the cost of a site. It is a commitment of time and resources that I will have to mull over.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#11 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,176 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 03 October 2010 - 04:50 PM

> I just think that it would take too much time to keep the site current with it.
> It is a commitment of time and resources that I will have to mull over.


Well, that is exactly my point in recommending a low priced software system that is
as easy to use as "cut and paste"!
Time invested in adding new content and images is minutes, not hours.
Money invested in software and hosting is a minimal per annum expense.

Googling for virtually everything is second nature now.
People look for artists online ... if they have heard of you and wonder what you make
they are out of luck if you don't have a website.
If someone wants to know more about you and your work where else can they go?

Come to think of it why would you want them to go anywhere else but the spot
where you control the content and the message?

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#12 Seasoned Warrior

Seasoned Warrior

    Businessman - Potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 298 posts

Posted 03 October 2010 - 06:25 PM

> I just think that it would take too much time to keep the site current with it.
> It is a commitment of time and resources that I will have to mull over.


Well, that is exactly my point in recommending a low priced software system that is
as easy to use as "cut and paste"!
Time invested in adding new content and images is minutes, not hours.
Money invested in software and hosting is a minimal per annum expense.

Googling for virtually everything is second nature now.
People look for artists online ... if they have heard of you and wonder what you make
they are out of luck if you don't have a website.
If someone wants to know more about you and your work where else can they go?

Come to think of it why would you want them to go anywhere else but the spot
where you control the content and the message?


Intellectually I understand the process, in practice I must be doing something wrong however, because it seems that updating my websites had become a job of its own. I agree with you compeltely as to the premise. I tend to be kind of a control freak from the standpoint that I like to parse all the variables and test the results. I have not been able to correlate sales or even visits from potential clients and a web presence. Doesn't mean I won't keep trying. I just believe that I must be doing something wrong. I have read the usual stuff on Search Engine Optimization, and tried cross-linking (Makes me sound like a polymer). The closest I have come to actually seeing an increase in hits is with print advertising. I have a tried a number of tactics to get people to click and I must be missing something. Maybe I'm over-thinking ths but to me if I can't see results then it's not working. I can see results with print advertising usually in the area of 2 to 5% inquiries, technically in B-school they teach that any advertising should generate a 1% response. My definition of response would be verifiable inquiries as a % of total hits although I have heard that on the web it is a lot less than 1%. I shall continue to contemplate the enigma known as the World Wide Web perhaps if I am lucky I will be struck with an Archimedian enlightenment: I promise not to run through the streets in like condition. So far my success has been much more pedestrian than Google-like.

Regards,
Charles

#13 Brandee Ross

Brandee Ross

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 34 posts
  • LocationDetroit, MI

Posted 03 October 2010 - 07:58 PM

I use Wordpress (free) and the WP eStore plugin ($39.95). I sell at my local farmers market every week and also at a few shows, so having the ability to log into my Wordpress site from any device with a web browser makes it very easy to keep my inventory updated if someone buys something I've also put in my online store.

Wordpress:
http://wordpress.org/

WP eStore:
http://www.tipsandtr...e-documentation

I considered Etsy, but didn't want to pay their listing/commission fees. The WP eStore took about 20 minutes to set up and add products, and you can use it with Google Checkout, PayPal or several other merchant gateways. My store could use a few visual tweaks, but for now it does the job without much effort or cost.

#14 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,176 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 04 October 2010 - 02:05 PM

Well, if you do run through the streets in a sheet make sure your website address
is clearly printed on it so it will show up on u tube.

I also came from a Business School background ... Unfortunately pre Internet.
Some rules have changed ... though the basics are the same.

You have to be publicly in business for people to buy your wares.
If you are not there how can anyone find you?
It is not hard to draw a straight line from no presence to no sales.

You can decide what you want your site to be and go from there.
And yes, there are people successfully selling from their sites but not
without doing some research and some daily/weekly work.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#15 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,033 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 04 October 2010 - 04:11 PM

Well, if you do run through the streets in a sheet make sure your website address
is clearly printed on it so it will show up on u tube.

I also came from a Business School background ... Unfortunately pre Internet.
Some rules have changed ... though the basics are the same.

You have to be publicly in business for people to buy your wares.
If you are not there how can anyone find you?
It is not hard to draw a straight line from no presence to no sales.

You can decide what you want your site to be and go from there.
And yes, there are people successfully selling from their sites but not
without doing some research and some daily/weekly work.



I am not new to site design, as I have designed sites for the hs I worked at, and did some other work in web design for industry. I have a good background with Illustrator, Corel Draw, Photoshop, Gimp, and 3-D programs such as Lightwave, and Blender. In the end it is not whether I put up a site, all of you have convinced me it is needed. Now I need to find out what content and format I will set up to do it. I have already decided on a time frame for next Spring debute.

It does look like this was a good topic for discussion, and I have already started to investigate WYSIWYG programs to create the site in, and host services from the links folks have placed here. I hope that this thread continues, as I will use every bit of information I can get at. Posts from individuals are so much more personal and topic intensive than Googling.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#16 lizet pottery

lizet pottery

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • LocationChicago, IL

Posted 08 October 2010 - 04:05 PM

For years I struggled with dreamweaver until this past January when I finally got my "duh" moment.

I thought that surely someone must have written software to make this easy for people who just want a site,
don't want to mess with HTML ... and there it all was once I Googled it ... choices galore and as easy as
cut and paste and dragging images.

I have a Mac and for less than $100 I have a great site that I can update easily so as to keep it fresh
which is key to return visits. I transferred my old site to it and was up in under three hours with new content.
I used Karelia software called Sandvox but there are others.

Use your front page as an active news area, not a boring list of links.
Many people never look any further than page one so grab them there.

As to etsy ... It works, but it is hard work and you have to tend it every day. You can't just put stuff up and
hope for the best. There are also places where you can can tips on selling there ... google again.

Selling from your site is hard unless you have some way of directing people to your site.
The most successful are those who do shows or have a sales area in their studios where they can give
out cards so people can come back for more work. People won't just find you.

I will say this with no hesitation ... Websites are a must. They are the business card of today.
They are the baseline guide to the professionalism of the artist.
They are also the easiest way to send your own message, showcase your work.



Thanks for you post Chris, it was helpful. I am on etsy now and you're right it can be hard work and people won't just find you. Luckily family and friends were able to post my site and get a lot of traffic flow into my shop. I even started a blog to try and get more people interested, but again people won't find me. I am seriously considering a website too be able to make my own personalized shop and you're right its a must have.

#17 GEP

GEP

    Moderator / full time potter ^6 stoneware

  • Moderators
  • 830 posts
  • LocationSilver Spring, MD

Posted 09 October 2010 - 09:26 AM

Here is a good article to start with if you are new to selling online.

http://www.theabunda...ell-art-online/

Keep in mind, there are no "easy-button" solutions for success with an online store, but this article spells out some basic principles, and covers some of the questions that were raised in this thread. But just like any other avenue for selling, it still requires a lot of good planning and lots of sweat!

-Mea
Mea Rhee
Good Elephant Pottery
http://www.goodelephant.com

#18 saragdc

saragdc

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • LocationRochester, NY

Posted 12 October 2010 - 07:32 PM

This information is useful as I'm in the process too of deciding whether to create a website or a blog. My understanding is that a website is more time intensive but can pay off significantly. I am leaning towards creating a blog because it is free and user-friendly (and I do have an Etsy shop which I found easy to manage, but it has numerous pros and cons). I'm just starting a home studio so I want to have one up as soon as I'm up and running.

#19 phill

phill

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 179 posts
  • Locationmn

Posted 11 February 2011 - 02:20 AM

i was fortunate enough to come into pottery at a time when websites were becoming necessary and when i actually had time to learn new things in great detail. the same creative/making drive that i have for pottery is also a large contributing factor for learning how to code a website. i am a total do-it-yourselfer because i love to make and love to learn.

anyway, i learned how to code websites using CSS and HTML. they are similar languages and probably the easiest to learn, if yorue wondering. a good website to be inspired by is http://www.csszengarden.com/ . this site at least shows you you dont need expensive programs to write beautiful websites, just time, energy, and willingness to learn. haha. i guess that is true with many things.

my recommendations: learn the code, and write the website yourself. that way you can update it and not have to pay anyone but the hosting and domain companies.

alternate recommendations:
ok, you dont want to learn code. here are some things i would/would not do, looking back after everything i have already learned, if i chose not to do the css/html route.

1. i would NOT use dreamweaver. too expensive, poor code, frustrating to use, doesnt work very well. its just as hard learning this program as it is learning real css/html. ive worked with it many times, and the more i kept working with it, the more i disliked it. i started out likeing it a lot because i could make a website, but i hated dealing with the shortcomings and i felt trapped like i couldnt make the website i wanted.
2. i would recommend a free blog software website like blogger.com or wordpress.com, etc. they have good SEO built in(search engine optimization - how easily your website pops up when someone searches for it among the trillions out there). this can be hard to achieve on your own. they are also generally easy and have great forums wiht all the problem fixes you could dream of. did i mention its free? one downfall - for people to stay interested in your stuff you WILL need to update your blog with actually interesting posts more often than you probably hope. and it IS hard to do, unless you have a lot of time. i dont have a lot of time. this can be frustrating to you and disappointing to your audience.
3. i might use otherpeoplespixels.com if i had the money (which i dont). this is nice if you dont have time but have the funds to afford it. it is kind of pricey for me. my old sculpture professor recommended it to me, and i see why (ease of use), but again i eventually decided differently to my satisfaction. otherpeoplespixels is a good example of "more money = easier/better". but that has always been the case.
4. probably a "no" to etsy as your only web presence. just too much crap on that website that i dont see as a good market for real art. although, it is a good way to get an easy and cheap shopping cart for online sales and i would definitely recommend that portion of etsy to any artist.

i hope this helps! im still learning lots, but after learning a good amount i hope i can direct some folks if they were questioning some routes. my website is http://www.phillip-schmidt.com if you want to see an example of an art website using only css and html. im not selling from my website yet but will someday, thus the lack of a shopping cart. and the photogallery was really easy to embed from flickr, and its nice-looking.

hope this helps,
phill

ps - one other recommendation. if you decide to build a website with css/html from the ground up, be sure to do some research and find website layouts you like of other websites. to save yourself a huge hassle and lots of time later on, be sure to really plan out exactly what you may need in your website (ie: contact page, about artist page, artist statement page, etc). this will speed things up quite a bit at the end of making your website. i learned from a great book here: http://www.sitepoint.com/books/html2/ . also a really good resource and education can be found here: w3 schools . the w3school is free and yhou can actually practice on their website. pretty cool.

#20 Guest_Herb Norris_*

Guest_Herb Norris_*
  • Guests

Posted 11 February 2011 - 04:13 AM

i was fortunate enough to come into pottery at a time when websites were becoming necessary and when i actually had time to learn new things in great detail. the same creative/making drive that i have for pottery is also a large contributing factor for learning how to code a website. i am a total do-it-yourselfer because i love to make and love to learn.

anyway, i learned how to code websites using CSS and HTML. they are similar languages and probably the easiest to learn, if yorue wondering. a good website to be inspired by is http://www.csszengarden.com/ . this site at least shows you you dont need expensive programs to write beautiful websites, just time, energy, and willingness to learn. haha. i guess that is true with many things.

my recommendations: learn the code, and write the website yourself. that way you can update it and not have to pay anyone but the hosting and domain companies.

alternate recommendations:
ok, you dont want to learn code. here are some things i would/would not do, looking back after everything i have already learned, if i chose not to do the css/html route.

1. i would NOT use dreamweaver. too expensive, poor code, frustrating to use, doesnt work very well. its just as hard learning this program as it is learning real css/html. ive worked with it many times, and the more i kept working with it, the more i disliked it. i started out likeing it a lot because i could make a website, but i hated dealing with the shortcomings and i felt trapped like i couldnt make the website i wanted.
2. i would recommend a free blog software website like blogger.com or wordpress.com, etc. they have good SEO built in(search engine optimization - how easily your website pops up when someone searches for it among the trillions out there). this can be hard to achieve on your own. they are also generally easy and have great forums wiht all the problem fixes you could dream of. did i mention its free? one downfall - for people to stay interested in your stuff you WILL need to update your blog with actually interesting posts more often than you probably hope. and it IS hard to do, unless you have a lot of time. i dont have a lot of time. this can be frustrating to you and disappointing to your audience.
3. i might use otherpeoplespixels.com if i had the money (which i dont). this is nice if you dont have time but have the funds to afford it. it is kind of pricey for me. my old sculpture professor recommended it to me, and i see why (ease of use), but again i eventually decided differently to my satisfaction. otherpeoplespixels is a good example of "more money = easier/better". but that has always been the case.
4. probably a "no" to etsy as your only web presence. just too much crap on that website that i dont see as a good market for real art. although, it is a good way to get an easy and cheap shopping cart for online sales and i would definitely recommend that portion of etsy to any artist.

i hope this helps! im still learning lots, but after learning a good amount i hope i can direct some folks if they were questioning some routes. my website is http://www.phillip-schmidt.com if you want to see an example of an art website using only css and html. im not selling from my website yet but will someday, thus the lack of a shopping cart. and the photogallery was really easy to embed from flickr, and its nice-looking.

hope this helps,
phill

ps - one other recommendation. if you decide to build a website with css/html from the ground up, be sure to do some research and find website layouts you like of other websites. to save yourself a huge hassle and lots of time later on, be sure to really plan out exactly what you may need in your website (ie: contact page, about artist page, artist statement page, etc). this will speed things up quite a bit at the end of making your website. i learned from a great book here: http://www.sitepoint.com/books/html2/ . also a really good resource and education can be found here: w3 schools . the w3school is free and yhou can actually practice on their website. pretty cool.


Hi Phillip,
Some good art CAN be found on Etsy. For a good discussion of same, see John Bauman's excellent site :
http://baumanstonewa...ys-on-etsy.html.

Good luck to you in pottery and sales!




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users