Jump to content

Seasoned Warrior

Members
  • Content Count

    300
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Seasoned Warrior

  1. Much like Pres, I like popped pop corn! Can't get much more natural than that, just don't use Canola to pop it with. Read what Canadian Oil is!
  2. Tyler Miller, FYI, the appropriate Tempil stick would get you the desired temp of 600deg C with no problems! Even a beginner could do it:)
  3. Excellent article by David Hendley in the current Clay Times goes into detail about how long it takes to make a piece from beginning to completion. The article is insightful and provides insight into the time expended and keeps it in perspective of the entire process. If you get a chance get this quick read it gives plenty of food for thought! Regards, Charles
  4. Here is an interesting blog post by an artist who has had enough of commercial entities stealing her intellectual property! http://lisacongdon.com/blog/2013/10/my-art-was-stolen-for-profit-and-how-you-can-help/
  5. I was browsing for some other information today and ran across this blog post on how to determine the asking price for a handmade item. I thought it worthy of posting since it seems to have a quick and dirty method of pricing that most can understand and this is a perennial quesiton on this site. http://whatthecraft.com/how-to-pricing/ Regards, Charles
  6. In a case to be decided by the Supreme Court of the US there is the possibility that items legitimately bought might not be able to be resold without the originators permission! Here is a news article discussing some of the potential pitfalls: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/your-right-to-resell-your-own-stuff-is-in-peril-2012-10-04
  7. Marcia's recommendations are spot on as usual. Oil clay is modelling clay which many potters refer to using a trademarked name such as Plasticine. Bisque molds if you are not familiar with making plaster molds are quite easy just press what yo want into a piece of clay, bisque it and voila! (a tip of the hat to Marcia's upcoming residence) you have a negative cavity that will produce many copies by pressing balls of clay into the cavities. One of the ways to get good impressions and constant density is to make a wooden press kind of like a tortilla press. Make little balls of clay and press them into either your bisque or plaster molds. Just make a little channel around the cavity for excess clay to extrude into. You can make an incredible variety and quantity of tiny items with this very simple setup. Regards, Charles
  8. Copyright has been a frequent topic on this site and much of the information has been questionable at best. Here is a free booklet that delves into it in in detail. It is specific to weavers but the information relates to anyone who creates original work. The booklet is available here and you may need to register on the site to get it but you can always unsubscribe later. Copyright 101 Regards, Charles
  9. is there a reason I might be getting this error message? Please Note: Your secure key, used to verify you are posting the topic, did not match the one submitted. Please go back, reload the form, and try again.
  10. I meant to mention that I believe you will find that the finger hole diameter has more to do with pitch than any other parameter.
  11. Mud to Music is probably the most definitive book on ceramic instruments out there. A must have for anyone's library if they are making anything in ceramic for music. I agree Pres! I probably should have given the proper title. "From Mud to Music" is written by Barry Hall who is a member of an all clay ensemble as well as being a well rounded musician in his own right. "Mud to Music is published by the American Ceramic Society ISBN: 1- 57498-139-0. Frank Georgini of tile-making fame has also written extensively on making Udus and has a website at www.udu.com. A book I have found as a good reference book for musical instruments in general has been "Musical Instrument Design" by Bart Hopkin published by See sharp Press ISBN: 1-884365-08-6. the book is valuable for its table s alone but some of the interesting instruments include bull kelp horns, gourds and calabash and a whole lot of quirky designs I wish I had the time to play with. Recently, in our area, there has been a lot of interest in ceramic Raku-fired djembes and timbale-like drums, I've seen a number of them at drum circles! Regards, Charles Oh Gosh .... I had resisted temptation so far- and it was really hard as this book has been coming to my attention on and off for about five years or so - and I have to confess I've just now ordered it on line! Thank you all for nudging me into action Christine You won't regret it Christine. It is truly a worthwhile book. Do you have a dog? The reason I ask is that there is a CD containing many of the instruments featured in the book with sound clips. The pre-columbian meso-american instruments caught my dog's attention and she was absolutely mesmerized by the sounds. It was very interesting to watch her reactions. She didn't care about the other instruments. Anyway I'm sure you will enjoy the book! Regards, Charles
  12. Mud to Music is probably the most definitive book on ceramic instruments out there. A must have for anyone's library if they are making anything in ceramic for music. I agree Pres! I probably should have given the proper title. "From Mud to Music" is written by Barry Hall who is a member of an all clay ensemble as well as being a well rounded musician in his own right. "Mud to Music is published by the American Ceramic Society ISBN: 1- 57498-139-0. Frank Georgini of tile-making fame has also written extensively on making Udus and has a website at www.udu.com. A book I have found as a good reference book for musical instruments in general has been "Musical Instrument Design" by Bart Hopkin published by See sharp Press ISBN: 1-884365-08-6. the book is valuable for its table s alone but some of the interesting instruments include bull kelp horns, gourds and calabash and a whole lot of quirky designs I wish I had the time to play with. Recently, in our area, there has been a lot of interest in ceramic Raku-fired djembes and timbale-like drums, I've seen a number of them at drum circles! Regards, Charles
  13. You might enjoy this anecdote on alternative firing. Years ago when I was a young nuclear engineering graduate I worked on a nuclear propelled space rocket and was involved in test firing the engine at Jackass Flat at the Nevada test site. You probably know that glass left for decades in the hot desert sun takes on a bluish cast that deepens with exposure. Antique dealers use the color to date and value old glass brought in from desert sites. The test firings would last a few seconds and were just used to determine thrust. A large number of the personnel involved in the test firings would bring in clear glass items to set in the test chamber around the engine. After the test firing the clear glass would have a beautiful blue color to it. A misconception about radioactivity is that items actually become radioactive but it is actually particles and can be washed off so the glass itself did not become radioactive. Regards, Charles I hope you have some of that blue glass! Marcia Unfortunately I never had any of my own to put in the engine test cell. I was an outside contractor at the time and I would drive out to McCarren field and board a DC3 that had all the windows blacked out for the short flight to Jackass Flat. The military was very picky and they checked everything we brought in or out: I was a veteran and I didn't want to cause any difficulties with the base personnel. The others actually lived on the base. Regards, Charles
  14. How did you modify your home oil furnace burner. Did you re-drill the orifice? I have a couple I've picked up along the way and I thought they might work well for a kiln. Regards, Charles
  15. I make ocarinas for a fun diversion. I can understand where concert pitch may be difficult to attain in the finished piece considering that so much changes physically in the process. What concert pitch are you trying to achieve, many tune to A above C which is accepted as 440Hz but some tune to 442Hz or 443Hz and many ensembles tune to each other. I am not even sure whether an ocarina is a transposing instrument or not. I'd certainly enjoy hearing of your achievements relative to pitch. Have you read the book Mud to Music? I've enjoyed it very much and it is an interesting discussion of clay instruments throughout history and cultures. One of my favorite parts of the book is the CD of audio samples from the various instruments. I especially enjoyed the sounds of the ancient meso-american water flutes. Regards, Charles
  16. Could one of the post secondary professors on this site recommend a good book on the chemistry of high fire micro-crystalline glazes? Regards, Charles
  17. I use a Brent. I like mine but it is a bit of hassel to change the shims though it is just something one has to get used to. Thee shims don't get out of adjustment. The cables can stretch but there is adjustment ot take up the slack with. The local Junior Collegge has the same model Brent I do and it is constantly our of adjustment but then the students tend to spin the wheel and let it bump against the ends which is very hard on the cables and causes the roller to get skewed which really makes it a pain to operate. I've lokked at the adjustment mechanisms and the screw adjustments seem to be robust on the Baily and I agree with Mark that North Star rollers ae on the low end. I don't how tricky it is to keep the adjustment screws properly adjusted so that you get a slab of consistent thickness perpendicular to the rolling direction. I like my brent just fine and have no plans of changing it. Regards, Charles
  18. I like Wordpress myself. They have excellent templates and are easy to use. I'm involved in several blogs and this is my preferable platform. www.wordpress.com Regards, Charles
  19. While I agree that it is nice to have a bit of good wine at a reception or opening. Only those who have never been sued are so cavalier about the legal process. I have to agree completely with Marcia. A way to avoid being sued while serving alcohol, at least in California, is to obtain the services of someone who is currently the holder of the appropriate liquor license. In California some bars and many caterers carry just that sort of license and also have the insurance to cover their service and leave you to concentrate on the show. regards, Charles
  20. etsy has great tutorials for selling on their site, you could start there http://www.etsy.com/blog/en/category/seller-handbook/ Regards, Charles
  21. When you drill the wheel head make sure that you use a tap drill sized for a 1/4" 20 tap and and then tap the holes. That is a 1/4 inch 20 threads per inch. You can go to the hardware store and get a couple of 1/4 - 20 socket head cap screws which will screw into the holes and make your wheel head just like the rest of the new commercial wheel heads. Make sure you use something hard like a nail to punch a dimple in the wheel head before drilling that way your drill won't wander. You can use some masking tape on which to mark the holes and you can center punch right through the tape.. Regards, Charles
  22. I like your page. I like supporting local business! A couple of years ago I got into the Small Business Saturday and I also support our First Friday (of each month) open sudio walk! I think that the idea is to support smaller businesses because they are the ones that actually support the local economy. I am in a tourist are and we have people here from all over the world visiting our small town. People will buy what they like regardless but it is also nice to offer something locally made that is a great alternative to the large chinese factory potteries that grind out tons of identical stuff with maybe a decal that has you locale on it. More power to you Chris and ignore the detractors they probably wish they had thought of it! I liked your "Buy Local" page and I like your own page: variety is the spice of life! Regards, Charles
  23. Should you find yourselves near Karlsruhe Germany on May 4, 5, or 6 be sure to check out EUNIQUE the Internationl Fair for Applied Arts and Design. Wiht 500 exhibitors I am sure there might be something for just about anyone. Check out their website http://www.eunique.eu/en/home/homepage.jsp Regards, Charles
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.