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#21 Wyndham

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 12:27 PM

Banding steel strap material, Hack saw blade, Centering arm, bamboo wooden kitchen set, grinding wheel, belt sander &..........Griffin Grip :D

 

Banding steel makes for great trimming tools, hack saw for trimming, chattering & texture. Bamboo for throwing ribs by way of grinder & belt sander and of course my fav, Griffin grip.

 

Takes a bunch of stuff to get the job done.

Wyndham



#22 MichaelP

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 02:36 PM

and of course my fav, Griffin grip.
 

Taking advantage of the fact that OffCenter has left us? nono.gif

 

Do you find Giffin Grip centering thrown pieces very well every time or there is often some eccenticity left, and you have to adjust piece positioning?



#23 oldlady

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:20 PM

Michael, carefully check the bottom of your grip to see that the three bolted on holders are in exactly the same place on each of the ribbed sections.  the ribs are very small and hard to see.  i had a lot of trouble with this before i noticed that one row was in the 33rd groove and the other two were in the 34th.  also, are your rods the exact same length?  the very early ones sometimes had the rubber hands set a little deeper in one of the three rods.  that is when they changed to rods and separate wooden "hands".  now they are set in the rubber again.  even a small difference is noticable.

 

one thing that helps if you use bat pins is to put the grip in place so it is not interfering with the batpins and mark the position of the three black outer grips on the side of your wheelhead with a sharpie.  each time you use the grip just put the outer grips inside the marks from the sharpie, press down and you are all set.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#24 Mark C.

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Posted 09 September 2013 - 10:33 PM

Adjusting the grip as oldlady said is key-this will make all the difference

 

(or there is often some eccenticity left) the answer is NO

 

I have three of them set up on a deadicated trim wheel(I only use 2) One is set for wide flat stuff the other is small or arm use. I just snap whichever one I need and I'm in high gear.

I bought two used with other stuff as a package deal.

Mark


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#25 MichaelP

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 02:50 AM

Thank you, Oldlady and Mark.  Very good points.

 

Everything is set correctly. I ran a few tests with a dial indicator and so called cylinder square, did some corrections and am going to continue trying the Grip. Rubber surely doesn't help keeping everything precise, but it shouldn't be a major problem. I'll see.

 

One thing I'll need is something to raise the splash pen walls on my Brent. The Giffin Grip surface is above the splash pan, so the shavings finish up on the floor. I'll just probably put a cardboard wall around the pan.



#26 Pres

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 08:24 AM

Other options to the cardboard were posted in another strand. this included making a wash tub basin into a splash pan by cutting it.  You will find the post here

http://ceramicartsda...r-griffin-grip/

I hope this helps you out.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#27 MichaelP

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 10:54 AM

This is one of the things that makes me ask myself why I didn't think about it. Excellent idea!

Thank you Pres. You made my day by providing the link.

 

Mike



#28 Pres

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 01:31 PM

you are welcome, Part of my job. . . . . . . I think?

 

Pres


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#29 Wyndham

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 01:46 PM

No, not a jab at Jim. He's a good fella & potter. I wish I could get down to the Georgia clay fest and meet him.

 

I have found that any tool that helps me through 20 or 30 mugs or bowls is a welcome tool.I also extrude handles which my customers seem to like.

As others have said, set up is the key, but I have used some electrical tape to shim one of the ears for better centering of the GG itself.

Wyndham



#30 MichaelP

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Posted 10 September 2013 - 09:14 PM

Thank you Wyndham.  If you visit Jim, please don't tell him there is one more user of GG who, on top of everything else, uses splash pans. :)

 

P.S. I still hope he'll return.



#31 Pam S

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 03:24 AM

While I use and love my purchased tools, a few of my favorites are re-purposed items. American Express sends me an application every so often and they include a fake card. They make lovely ribs and trimming tools. Often eyeliner pencils come with a rubber, smudging end. These work great for pressing seams. As Pres suggested, old pairing knives work wonders!

"Saving just one dog won't change the world, but it surely will change the world for that one dog."


#32 oldlady

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:04 AM

now that i have found my way back to september 2013 after taking the giffin grip detour suggested above, i noticed that the photos posted do not show the simple addition of lines drawn with a sharpie to mark the divisions of six that are possible on your grip.

 

 i use my grip to trim and then immediately add slips that i carve through, (see avatar).  if you put a straight line from each  of the three slider grooves to the opposite side of the grip top you will have marks for a division of three.  add ones between those and you have six.  they do not have to be engineer like precise, just suitable to help plan a layout.  trimming, slipping and carving 20 bowls or plates means the grip is in place for a very long session. wads of clay get in the way but the low, wide sliders are just right.

 

making concentric rings on the top will help, too.  my grip is so helpful all the time but it does have some drawbacks. i cannot use it on the wheel in florida because it is a different brand and i would have to change the settings to make it fit.  too hard to see those tiny little grooves.  wish jim would move that lizard and mail the unloved grip to me.


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#33 oldlady

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 08:11 AM

i guess it is a tool even though i do not think of it that way.  i am talking about the table top surrounding my wheel.  it is just a piece of tileboard about 4x4 feet mounted just above the level of the wheel's table.  it is amazing what can be held within arm's reach. 


"putting you down does not raise me up."

#34 Celia UK

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Posted 11 September 2013 - 03:02 PM

Mudtools are just brilliant! Ribs as described in previous post but also their synthetic sponge and finishing sponge. Both are amazing - better than natural sponges, cheaper AND more durable. I can't them highly enough.




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