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Trouble Beginning A Large Sculpture


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#1 cwarzecha

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:01 AM

My concept is this: I want to make an arch out of clay that will stand outdoors. It will be in the style of a triumphal arch, about 8-10 feet tall. I want it to be constructed from hollow, lincoln log style pieces. However, the issue I am having is how to construct the pieces so that they are all exactly the same because I have little experience with mold-making. I also don't know if it's possible to make molds for an outdoor sculpture because the clay would have to be different to withstand the weather and different temperatures. I guess my main question is, what do you think would be the best route for making identical, hollow, lincoln log styled ceramic pieces about 18 inches long and 4-6 inches wide?



#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 12:00 PM

You need a freeze proof clay

 

 

Linda Blossom' ^6 Clay Body

Hawthorne Fire Clay    35

OM #4 Ball Clay            20

Newman Red                  20

Fine Grog                        20

Silica 200 mesh               15

G200 Feldspar                10

to glaze green use .5% vee gum in glaze

Chip Clauson's Freeze Proof Terra Cotta ^ 1

                                     Batch        %

Hawthorne Fire Clay      20       9

C and C Ball                    50        21

Red Art                            100      43

Talc                                   15         6

Muddox Grog                   50        21

.5 Barium Carbonate

 

 

Bill Daley's Body ^6 tight Clay Body

Ball Clay                   13.33%

Cedar Hts Red Art  40

Fire Clay                   20

Newman Red Clay   26.67

                                100

Barium Carbonate  1% dissolve in water

Grog                        10%

 

You will need to consider rebar into the foundation to make it stable, how to attach each of the pieces. 

Lots to figure out and design.

Marcia



#3 mregecko

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 12:56 PM

Do you have a pugger?

 

You can always use a pug-mill extrusion die for large hollow tubes. Recently saw a large (8 ft-ish) sculpture made of pugmill extruded tubes of difference sizes and shapes. Was beautiful.



#4 perkolator

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 01:08 PM

once you figure out what clay works best for the climate your piece will be installed, i would either use an extruder or press molds to replicate the form.  most likely i'm guessing you don't have a pugger, so that's why i suggested extruder as they are much more affordable.  many mechanical extruders have a 4-5" die, heck you could even make your own with a larger diameter they are so simply designed - just remember the larger you go you will either need softer clay or hydraulic cylinder to press the mass out the end.  as for press molds, i would suggest plaster molds and make several of them (like a dozen molds) so you can go into full production as I'm assuming you will need A LOT of parts.  also, not knowing exactly what you're making, i would suggest instead of actually piecing together a 10ft structure from individual pieces - to make larger sections with your small components, thus firing and installing will go much easier due to less parts (but it'd still look the same if you engineer it correctly)



#5 Diane Puckett

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 02:23 PM

Are you planning to make a smaller version to determine problems and solutions before creating your full-size sculpture?
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#6 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 08:31 PM

Linda Blossom, name sake of the clay body above, was the editor of Peter King book. her work in Ithica, NY has been on a bridge in NY for more than 10 years. it is freeze proof.
marcia

#7 Pres

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 09:35 PM

I mentioned the first Penland Crafts book in aprevious post. If you can find a copy of this bbok, there is a potter demonstrating the construction of a tall arch in pieces to be assembled after firing. The pages show the column pieces in assembly with views showing the internal structure and the arch section with internal. Ireally think a copy of this book would help you. Chris Campbell may be able to help with the full name and editor/author.

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#8 Chris Campbell

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Posted 16 July 2013 - 10:03 PM

Sorry, I've only seen old copies of the book and have never done architectural ceramics.

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#9 JLowes

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 12:27 PM

Do you have access to tubular concrete forms (a brand name is USA is Sonotube) that are made of water resistant cardboard?  Those could be used as a support for making tubes from slabs.  Or for the diameter you mention, PVC pipe may be an alternative.

 

  Also, there was an article by Peter King in Pottery Making Illustrated that was posted in Ceramic Arts Daily with a method of building a form, along with a project to review for tips:  http://ceramicartsda...culptural-uses/

 

Sounds like an interesting project.

 

John



#10 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 01:30 PM

here is an article I wrote in 2002 for PMI using sonatubes.
 
2002 “How to Build a Bird Bath,” Pottery Making Illustrated, Nov/Dec pp. 21-23. the jpg is from an architectural ceramics class I taught in Italy in 2004. We had to use a large pvc pipe, wrapped in newspaper. The clay slab is rolled onto the tube while backed with tar paper.It sets up for a while and then the tube slides out. This pictured tube was the bottom half of a column for a large garden arch.

 

 

Marcia

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#11 Biglou13

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Posted 17 July 2013 - 01:50 PM

 

extruded tube sculpture fire in place   start at 3 min

 

maybe something here will help you

 

(not to mention sawdust firiing is super cool)(TY marcia)


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#12 cwarzecha

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:08 PM

Hi everyone,

Thanks so much for all of your wonderful responses. Sorry it's been so long since I've responded. I got busy with, well, life.

Going to do a lot more research before I begin. I do not have a pugger, but I have considered using an extruder. Need to upgrade mine though as it tends to rip the clay no matter what clay body I use. It's an ancient Brent model, which is why I asked about making molds instead. I'm just not as familiar with mold-making as I'd like to be. The books and recipe suggestions are extremely helpful, I'll look into them.

Thanks again!

Christina Warzecha

 

(and to the post that asked where I am from: I am from Illinois, but I have Polish ancestors, hence the strange last name)



#13 PeterH

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:32 PM

Pres,

I mentioned the first Penland Crafts book in a previous post. If you can find a copy of this book, there is a potter demonstrating

the construction of a tall arch in pieces to be assembled after firing. The pages show the column pieces in assembly with views

showing the internal structure and the arch section with internal. I really think a copy of this book would help you.

 

Is the book you are talking about:

 

Title The Penland School of Crafts Book of Pottery With Photography by Evon Streetman
A Rutledge book Authors John Coyne, Penland School of Handicrafts, Penland, N.C. Publisher Bobbs-Merrill, 1975 Length

191 pages

 

Picture of the cover at:

http://tinyurl.com/pcdthea

 

If so, second-hand copies are available cheaply:

To the UK in £

http://tinyurl.com/q97wrzy

To the USA in $

http://tinyurl.com/nzb74yo

 

Regards, Peter



#14 bciskepottery

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 07:39 PM

You might find the works of Jim Robison a good point of reference.

 

http://www.boothhous...co.uk/index.htm



#15 Pres

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 08:05 AM

Pres,

I mentioned the first Penland Crafts book in a previous post. If you can find a copy of this book, there is a potter demonstrating

the construction of a tall arch in pieces to be assembled after firing. The pages show the column pieces in assembly with views

showing the internal structure and the arch section with internal. I really think a copy of this book would help you.

 

Is the book you are talking about:

 

Title The Penland School of Crafts Book of Pottery With Photography by Evon Streetman
A Rutledge book Authors John Coyne, Penland School of Handicrafts, Penland, N.C. Publisher Bobbs-Merrill, 1975 Length

191 pages

 

Picture of the cover at:

http://tinyurl.com/pcdthea

 

If so, second-hand copies are available cheaply:

To the UK in £

http://tinyurl.com/q97wrzy

To the USA in $

http://tinyurl.com/nzb74yo

 

Regards, Peter

Yes this is the book.  there is an arch demo in it using coils with the columns each one piece, and the arch/top another piece.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#16 cwarzecha

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Posted 04 September 2013 - 09:09 PM

Thanks for the book and artist suggestions. Doing lots of research now! I really appreciate all the responses.






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