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trimming platter with altered rim


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#1 smokin pots

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 10:16 AM

I can't visualize the type of chuck needed to turn a foot on a bowl, platter, with an altered rim. It will need to be a wet chuck because my piece will be ready
to trim in a couple of days. Would it be a large mound of clay roughly the size of the base for support and high enough so the rim doesnt touch the wheel head?
Any and all information would be helpful. "I'm trying to think, but nothings happening".
juli
la paloma texas pottery

#2 Benzine

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 10:59 AM

A picture, or at least description of the rim would help.

But, a mound of centered clay, as you described, should work. Put a couple scrap pieces of cloth on the centered mound, so the platter doesn't stick.
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#3 JLowes

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 01:55 PM

As Benzine suggests, making a large clay chuck is one way to make the support for trimming a platter. I like the idea of cloth to keep the platter from sticking, but I also use plastic wrap over the chuck to keep the trim item from sticking to the chuck. I like this, as it keeps the clay in the chuck ready to be wedged and used again.

Another method is to use thick foam, or layers of foam built up, to support the platter while trimming. I have a bat I made using foam that I use to trim. If the rim is wider than my foam bat, I use that, and build up foam support as needed. Keep the wheel speed low, and carefully work the platter on center to trim. Cautions are catching the trimming tool on too soft clay and gouging or jerking the piece off center. I frequently trim too soft and learned the cautions the hard way.

John

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 02:39 PM

I use a large bat with foam glued to it-works for many forms.
Mark
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#5 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 03:50 PM

I have a bat with 2" foam as mark describes. If this won't work for your altered rim, try putting a 1-2" thick clay coil on the rim of a coffee can. Center the can and attach with clay.
you can lay a thin piece of oam on top of that. I have added some water to the can to help give it some weight if needed. It really depends on how altered a shape you have to work with.

Marcia

#6 smokin pots

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 04:31 PM

Thanks for all the good suggestions. All are workable for me. I just got stuck with thinking a chuck was the only way and forgot all the standard ways to trim. Must be the 98 degree day, with humidity!
juli
la paloma texas pottery

#7 MichaelP

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 07:35 PM

Must be the 98 degree day, with humidity!

..or, maybe, the answer is in your screen name... :D

#8 smokin pots

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Posted 17 June 2013 - 09:10 PM

Too funny! It is a great screen name if I may say so myself!
J
la paloma texas pottery

#9 MichaelP

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Posted 18 June 2013 - 01:09 AM

True.




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