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Rebekah Krieger

Teapots

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I made my first teapot- right now it is glazing so I will be able to post a picture tomorrow. (lets hope the glaze looks nice, it's a dark clay body and I have not done a test tile) Anyways, I did a "test pour" after it was bisqued, and it poured out nice, but when I go back upright with it, it will drip down the spout a little. Is there a way to prevent this?

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Mark C.    1,805

The sharper the edge is the less the drip. These is a catch 22 thing as real thin and its to fragile.

On old timer trick I learned from my mentor is to put a very thin amount of butter on your finger and wipe under the tip of the spout-fluid then brecks away and rolls back down the inside not over the edge.

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OffCenter    82

As Mark said, "The sharper the edge is the less the drip" but it doesn't have to be thin to be sharp. Say the clay at the end of the spout is 1/8-inch thick. Don't make it any thinner but make sure the edges of that 1/8-inch wall are all sharp 90 degree angles instead of rounded. When you glaze the pot wipe the glaze away or, at least, leave it very thin so that the glaze doesn't round off those edges. Experiment with angles so that you actually make the end thinner but for such a short length that it isn't fragile and you'll find a way to make a drip-less or almost drip-less spout. (This is hard to explain without diagrams.)

 

Jim

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As Mark said, "The sharper the edge is the less the drip" but it doesn't have to be thin to be sharp. Say the clay at the end of the spout is 1/8-inch thick. Don't make it any thinner but make sure the edges of that 1/8-inch wall are all sharp 90 degree angles instead of rounded. When you glaze the pot wipe the glaze away or, at least, leave it very thin so that the glaze doesn't round off those edges. Experiment with angles so that you actually make the end thinner but for such a short length that it isn't fragile and you'll find a way to make a drip-less or almost drip-less spout. (This is hard to explain without diagrams.)

 

Jim

 

 

I think that is my problem, I kept running my finger around the rim of the spout to "smooth out edges"... I probably screwed myself with that move. My angle might be off too. I will post a picture tomorrow when My pots are done, maybe you can copy the pic and draw on it to show me the correct placement if it's not too much trouble. (your diagram comment is what caused me to ask... don't bail on me like Atomic did in the glaze topic ha ha ha )

As a new potter (it will be a year this mothers day) I completely appreciate all of your advice, I know I make a lot of bone headed rookie mistakes, and it's nice to have a team to tell me about it.

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TJR    359

Rebbylicious;

One trick some potters do to get a sharp edge on the spout is to wax the very end.[just the flat edge]. Then it is sharper. This is a bit of a pain to do, and an extra step, so I don't bother.

The angle of spout should be about 45 degrees.

TJR.

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Mark C.    1,805

One way to think about this think about a drop of water as it rolls off something.

The sharp edge makes water roll one way or the other

The rounded edge allows a drop to go over the edge

This rounded edge can be from over soothed clay or thick glaze both can allow water to drip down.

A sharp edge as well as a thin glaze makes for the drip to go back down the spout not over the spout down the neck.

If it drips after glaze firing try the little bit of butter on underside of spout to reduce surface tension and back drip.

a Few other notes on spouts-remember if they are thrown spouts and you cut them at a angle they will untwist some during a glaze fire which can change the angle.

This is all learned over time and will take time to learn.

Mark

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

I just use my finger and sort of pull the spot like a handle to get a nice bend and finish by sharpening the low side of the spout.

I clean the glaze off a little bit on the sharp edge to stop the drip. It also helps if the shape of the pot flows into the spot and if the spot starts low on the belly of the pot and ends above the level of the lid. It should not end below the level of the lid or you can't fill up the pot with tea.

It all works together to function well. Looking forward to the pictures.

Marcia

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I just use my finger and sort of pull the spot like a handle to get a nice bend and finish by sharpening the low side of the spout.

I clean the glaze off a little bit on the sharp edge to stop the drip. It also helps if the shape of the pot flows into the spot and if the spot starts low on the belly of the pot and ends above the level of the lid. It should not end below the level of the lid or you can't fill up the pot with tea.

It all works together to function well. Looking forward to the pictures.

Marcia

 

 

do you have any pictures of your pulled spout? Sounds very cool!

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

http://ceramicartsdaily.org/community/index.php?app=gallery&module=images&section=viewimage&img=772

Not the best example right now as I only have my iPad. this one is in my gallery under yellow glaze. The spout is altered by pulling it like a handle and bending it with a finger.

marcia

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Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

post-19612-136733292628_thumb.jpg

post-19612-136733292628_thumb.jpg

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TJR    359

Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

 

 

Hey,there;

A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.

TJR.rolleyes.gif

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OffCenter    82

Nice first teapot. The handle looks good and while it's nice to have a locking lid, most teapots require that you keep one hand on the lid as you pour. I don't know how well it pours but even if it pours well the spout needs work. All you need to do is look at lots of teapots and practice. Good job!

 

Jim

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Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

 

 

Hey,there;

A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.

TJR.rolleyes.gif

 

 

Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!

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Nice first teapot. The handle looks good and while it's nice to have a locking lid, most teapots require that you keep one hand on the lid as you pour. I don't know how well it pours but even if it pours well the spout needs work. All you need to do is look at lots of teapots and practice. Good job!

 

Jim

 

 

Thanks! I am going to practice making spouts (and lids that don't fall off quite as easily)

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OffCenter    82

Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

 

 

Hey,there;

A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.

TJR.rolleyes.gif

 

 

Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!

 

 

I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

 

Jim

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Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

 

 

Hey,there;

A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.

TJR.rolleyes.gif

 

 

Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!

 

 

I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

 

Jim

 

 

you are too funny! But i will check out the book

 

 

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gypsy    0

Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

 

 

Hey,there;

A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.

TJR.rolleyes.gif

 

 

Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!

 

 

I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

 

Jim

 

 

you are too funny! But i will check out the book

 

 

 

 

I think it is a lovely tea pot and love the glaze.

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neilestrick    1,381

You want a wide opening where the spout attaches to the pot, to ensure that the spout completely fills with liquid. The total area of the strainer holes in the pot must be more than the area of the opening at the end of the spout. Otherwise it will not pour well. Also, the spout must taper and never widen out again, or it will suck air and glug as it pours. The top of the spout should be roughly even with the top of the pot.

 

post-6933-136734844134_thumb.jpg post-6933-136734844367_thumb.jpg

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Pres    896

Ok- be gentile, this is my first teapot ever. My lid does not stay on tightly, it would fall off if you try to pour without holding it down which is a major flaw. I used coyote light green shino and it is a dark cone 5-6 clay body from A.R.T in racine wisconsin.

 

Hey,there;

A great first effort. The trick with teapots is that you want the spout to get smaller and smaller. When you restrict the flow like this, it pours. If you have a bulb, like yours, or if the spout opens up on the end, the tea will gurgle. Check out an example of what I am saying in my gallery page. I do not know how to make attachments, as I am a bit of a Ludite.Keep at it.

TJR.rolleyes.gif

 

Thanks for that! When I was making my teapot I was just looking at Google images to get inspiration, I did the "bulb" type spout because I saw a lot of them and thought they looked cool, but I guess I was looking at faulty pots LOL!! It would help if I look at work from respected potters to learn from!

 

I don't think you're going to find any respected potters here. Lark Publishing's "500 Teapots" is a start.

 

Jim

 

Sounds like throwing down the gauntlet there.

 

I have always considered the teapot the ultimate test of a functional potter. Most people get the first few parts right, the lid and the handle, but the spout befuddles many. I have read 10 page discussions on the correct proportions of teapots and the places where folks fail-interesting reading. All too often you will find the teapot with the spout that come out straight not allowing the pot to be filled completely because it starts to pour while liquid is going in. Or the teapot where liquid splatters out in a spray because not enough of a straight area was set up to compress the pour. We also see pots where not enough funnel was developed so the flow dribbles out of the pot. My favorite error is a spout so steep of an angle the pot nearly has to be turned upside down to pour! All of these can be corrected by careful observation, but it is easy to overlook things. This is one reason why I always throw 5 pots at a time then 10 spouts, and 8 lids. As I am not a perfect potter, I accomplish the task by mixing and matching. If I happen to have left over pieces when all pots are done, then I use them on the next batch. I love teapots so do them often.

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OffCenter    82

You want a wide opening where the spout attaches to the pot, to ensure that the spout completely fills with liquid. The total area of the strainer holes in the pot must be more than the area of the opening at the end of the spout. Otherwise it will not pour well. Also, the spout must taper and never widen out again, or it will suck air and glug as it pours. The top of the spout should be roughly even with the top of the pot.

 

post-6933-136734844134_thumb.jpg post-6933-136734844367_thumb.jpg

 

Do you have one in blue?

 

Jim

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neilestrick    1,381

You want a wide opening where the spout attaches to the pot, to ensure that the spout completely fills with liquid. The total area of the strainer holes in the pot must be more than the area of the opening at the end of the spout. Otherwise it will not pour well. Also, the spout must taper and never widen out again, or it will suck air and glug as it pours. The top of the spout should be roughly even with the top of the pot.

 

post-6933-136734844134_thumb.jpg post-6933-136734844367_thumb.jpg

 

Do you have one in blue?

 

Jim

 

They always want blue.....

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Pres    896

You want a wide opening where the spout attaches to the pot, to ensure that the spout completely fills with liquid. The total area of the strainer holes in the pot must be more than the area of the opening at the end of the spout. Otherwise it will not pour well. Also, the spout must taper and never widen out again, or it will suck air and glug as it pours. The top of the spout should be roughly even with the top of the pot.

 

post-6933-136734844134_thumb.jpg post-6933-136734844367_thumb.jpg

 

Do you have one in blue?

 

Jim

 

Yeah they always want blue, sometimes purple!

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