Jump to content


Photo

I put a penny in the kiln- but what in the world happened?


  • Please log in to reply
40 replies to this topic

#1 MariaPolky

MariaPolky

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:31 PM

I'm not sure if this is the right place to address this topic, but I'll go for it.


I had a class assignment to make any kind of experiment to learn more about material science, so I decided to test if pennies, nickels, and dimes could be used as a colorant when submerged in a glaze, and taken to cone 10. This definitely didn't work, as the nickels and dimes melted, and actually burned through the clay test trays :/ but the pennies did something so strange that I really cannot begin to understand...

The first is a penny alone in a clay tray, taken to cone 10
Attached File  DSC_0053.jpg   1.05MB   581 downloads

The second is a penny submerged in a clear glaze and taken to cone 10
Attached File  DSC_0033.jpg   949.77KB   546 downloads

All my penny tests grew these hard, textured, cord-things. It was definitely a shock.
I'm wondering if the reason for this is that the Zinc being the majority of the penny (I used post 1983 pennies) turned to calx because it melts at such a lower temperature, and since the copper is surrounding the zinc, maybe the zinc was pushing it's way out of the core and squeezed out, hardening along the way??

Does anyone have any ideas? I'm open to any thoughts, I'm completely confused by these little aliens!!

#2 Matt Oz

Matt Oz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 268 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:46 AM

I don't know, but it's awesome.

#3 trina

trina

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 437 posts

Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:46 AM

Cool. T

#4 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,206 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:16 AM

Now I have to try that! Way cool.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
http://www.ccpottery.com/

https://www.facebook...88317932?ref=hl

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#5 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,976 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:24 AM

Wow! looks like War of the Worlds. cool!
Marcia

#6 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,977 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 06 December 2012 - 03:51 PM

WOW! Very interesting. Have to think on THAT one.

best,

..............john
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#7 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:37 PM

What were you hoping to see?

Per the US Mint, since 1982 pennies have been made of copper-coated zinc. I had no idea, though, with the value of copper, I should have known.

Composition: Copper-Plated Zinc: 2.5% Cu, Balance Zn
Weight: 2.500 g
Diameter: 0.750 in., 19.05 mm
Thickness: 1.55 mm
Edge: Plain

http://www.usmint.go...ction=CircPenny
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#8 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,709 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:46 PM

looks like a prank to me. that first pic looks like two different metals and strangely like an electrical connection.

braided wire maybe?


Ditto. Looks like something was put in there.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#9 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,977 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:51 PM


looks like a prank to me. that first pic looks like two different metals and strangely like an electrical connection.

braided wire maybe?


Ditto. Looks like something was put in there.


Mistaken identity on the particular test bowls??????

Someone screwing around with the original person's tests as a joke?
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#10 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,709 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 06 December 2012 - 06:32 PM



looks like a prank to me. that first pic looks like two different metals and strangely like an electrical connection.

braided wire maybe?


Ditto. Looks like something was put in there.


Mistaken identity on the particular test bowls??????

Someone screwing around with the original person's tests as a joke?

Could also be accidental. Don't want to be a pessimist, but I have a hard time believing that structure grew out of a coin. Something's fishy here.
Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#11 Idaho Potter

Idaho Potter

    Learning all the time

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 400 posts
  • LocationBoise, Idaho

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:02 PM

No way a penny could make that much material--not enough to start with. The stuff coming out of the glazed bowl looks like mild rebar (the thinner stuff you can form with your hands) coated with glaze. Something fishy going on.

#12 Matt Oz

Matt Oz

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 268 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:05 PM

But its not April yet :P

#13 MariaPolky

MariaPolky

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts

Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:51 PM

Weirdly, and I promise, this is not a prank.
The cone 04 was a pile of white fluff and the cone 6 was a softer long thing.
The only way to get the hard long thing is if you take it to cone 10. Also this was oxidation, the reduction was not nearly as cool.
If you have a kiln and a test tray you should try this and let me know if you had a similar experience

I had my critique today, but I'm still pretty confused. A grad student said that when he was in undergrad somebody put a lot of pennies on her sculpture and they all made these wire things, like a fountain. I'm definitely going to keep trying this

So this was my testing
Attached File  DSC_0001.jpg   1.1MB   255 downloads


Another penny in a clear glaze. The cord broke so it's pictured just resting
Attached File  DSC_0024.jpg   984.23KB   255 downloads


Close up of what happened with just a penny (this cord broke too, so it just reasting next to it's ... I guess root?)
Attached File  DSC_0038.jpg   993.43KB   224 downloads


and finally this was the penny in reduction
Attached File  DSC_0056.jpg   1021.76KB   185 downloads

#14 justanassembler

justanassembler

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 248 posts
  • LocationBaton Rouge, LA

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:40 PM

Weirdly, and I promise, this is not a prank.
The cone 04 was a pile of white fluff and the cone 6 was a softer long thing.
The only way to get the hard long thing is if you take it to cone 10. Also this was oxidation, the reduction was not nearly as cool.
If you have a kiln and a test tray you should try this and let me know if you had a similar experience

I had my critique today, but I'm still pretty confused. A grad student said that when he was in undergrad somebody put a lot of pennies on her sculpture and they all made these wire things, like a fountain. I'm definitely going to keep trying this

So this was my testing
Attached File  DSC_0001.jpg   1.1MB   255 downloads


Another penny in a clear glaze. The cord broke so it's pictured just resting
Attached File  DSC_0024.jpg   984.23KB   255 downloads


Close up of what happened with just a penny (this cord broke too, so it just reasting next to it's ... I guess root?)
Attached File  DSC_0038.jpg   993.43KB   224 downloads


and finally this was the penny in reduction
Attached File  DSC_0056.jpg   1021.76KB   185 downloads


I believe it has to do with the zinc in the pennies, which can also melt through corderite kiln shelves--I saw this and more happen to a beginning ceramics student in undergrad--I also got to watch the faculty reaction upon seeing a penny melted well into 1" thick kiln shelves.

#15 Round2potter

Round2potter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 60 posts
  • LocationPortland, Orygun

Posted 06 December 2012 - 10:54 PM

To anybody who thinks this is REAL.

IT IS!

i heard that a newish penny would do this and sent one through an 04 glaze fire with almost the exact same result!

I did not however put a glaze in it.

And Maria,

Try splittling the now fired penny into layers!

I dropped mine and it split yielding a really shinny and glittery spiral pattern thing. Super cool!!!

- Burt
"There is no such thing as cheating in clay; So long as it works"

#16 OffCenter

OffCenter

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,372 posts

Posted 07 December 2012 - 10:41 AM

Damn! Isn't it weird that so many of us who have been potting for centuries didn't know about this! I think of all the weird things I have put in firings from moth balls (not their actual balls, but the chemical pesticide) to deer livers and I never tried a penny! Can't wait to put one in my next firing. Wish I could afford to put a nickel and a dime in, too.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#17 Diane Puckett

Diane Puckett

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 398 posts
  • LocationAsheville, NC

Posted 07 December 2012 - 11:45 AM

I wonder what one of those trillion dollar titanium coins would do.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#18 JBaymore

JBaymore

    Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 2,977 posts
  • LocationWilton, NH USA

Posted 07 December 2012 - 11:46 AM

Damn! Isn't it weird that so many of us who have been potting for centuries didn't know about this! I think of all the weird things I have put in firings from moth balls (not their actual balls, but the chemical pesticide) to deer livers and I never tried a penny! Can't wait to put one in my next firing. Wish I could afford to put a nickel and a dime in, too.

Jim




:Dsrc="http://ceramicartsda...t/biggrin.gif"> :Dsrc="http://ceramicartsda...t/biggrin.gif"> :Dsrc="http://ceramicartsda...t/biggrin.gif">
John Baymore
Immediate Past President; Potters Council
Professor of Ceramics; New Hampshire Insitute of Art

http://www.JohnBaymore.com

#19 mregecko

mregecko

    Potteries

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 154 posts
  • LocationBay Area, CA

Posted 07 December 2012 - 06:59 PM

For what it's worth, good to note that Zinc's boiling point is only ~1650F, and Zinc vapors are mega bad for you... So only do this if your kiln is well ventilated.

#20 bigDave

bigDave

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 89 posts
  • LocationSo-Cal

Posted 07 December 2012 - 10:33 PM


The only way to get the hard long thing is if you take it to cone 10.
-MariaPolky




Amazing like magic

I making a t shirt with your quote above, hope you dont mind




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users