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Chukchi

Clay leaves glazing techniques!

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Chukchi    0

Another high school art teacher here...having a time figuring out how to best show off the delicate leaf structures we are getting.

Glazes just cover them up and we are unable to find or make translucent glazes.

We'd like to somehow get one color in the leaf vien and another on the overall, kind of like water color.

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

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Chukchi    0

Making and assembling the leaves is something we have really gotten into. Our problem is creating and using color to show off the leaves. We'd like to create a a seasonal motif like fall and spring, especially for our Empty Bowls fundraiser.

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bciskepottery    925

Using a transparent glaze -- like a Celadon -- can show vein patterns where it pools darker. If you have a clear glaze, you can add mason stain to give you some transparent colors.

 

DAY shows a wonderful use of underglazes for colors.

 

Chris suggested soaking leaves in a medium bleach/water mixture to get just the vein structure . . . take that vein structure, dip it in an iron oxide wash and impress into clay. The leaf will burn out during firing but should leave behind the iron oxide outline of the vein pattern.

 

 

You can use an iron oxide wash to highlight the leaf veins -- either brushed over the entire leaf and then wiped off the top surface with a sponge or by using a small amount of wash and letting capillary action do its thing. You can impress the leaf, bisque fire, then wax the leaf and apply glaze to the rest of the vessel -- leaving the leaf fired to natural clay color -- a nice contrast.

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Chris Campbell    1,084

I would also recommend multiple firings. Work on getting the vein color first then set it with a cone 018 firing, then apply the next colors. Oxides and underglazes work well ... bonus here is you can just wash off the underglazes if you don't like it and try again .... you could low fire a clear glaze over the final result if needed..

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Chukchi    0

I would also recommend multiple firings. Work on getting the vein color first then set it with a cone 018 firing, then apply the next colors. Oxides and underglazes work well ... bonus here is you can just wash off the underglazes if you don't like it and try again .... you could low fire a clear glaze over the final result if needed..

 

 

Chris,

Would you fire the clay to cone 04 and the use underglazes at the suggested 018?

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SShirley    9

What color clay are you using? You might try putting on slip or terra-sig and then lightly sanding the veins to reveal the clay color (that might be easiest when it's bisqued), then a clear glaze over that, or some kind of glaze that will show the difference between the slipped areas and the sanded to bare clay areas.

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Chris Campbell    1,084

I would do your main firings as usual for your clay body and the first layer of color for the leaf veins... Use Cone 018 if you want to do multiple firings for the underglaze colors because you don't need to go any higher than that if all you want to do is make them smudge proof so you can work over them.

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Chukchi    0

I would do your main firings as usual for your clay body and the first layer of color for the leaf veins... Use Cone 018 if you want to do multiple firings for the underglaze colors because you don't need to go any higher than that if all you want to do is make them smudge proof so you can work over them.

 

Thanks! I will try that out.

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Wil    0

Email me

 

 

Another high school art teacher here...having a time figuring out how to best show off the delicate leaf structures we are getting.

Glazes just cover them up and we are unable to find or make translucent glazes.

We'd like to somehow get one color in the leaf vien and another on the overall, kind of like water color.

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

 

 

 

 

I am new on the forum but have had some good results with my leaf glazing which I have done in the past 10 years. I use the handle end of the brush to create the details of the leaf. Next is to take a dark glaze, and do the details with that color. After letting that dry, I use a natural sponge and with the selected glace colors, I dab my sponge in the glazes and pat them on the leaf. I do not put the glaze on too heavily so as not to cover up the detail. As you gain experience, you will know how much to put on the detail of the leaf, and how much glaze to put on the leaf itself. I hope this helps.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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kathi    2

Another high school art teacher here...having a time figuring out how to best show off the delicate leaf structures we are getting.

Glazes just cover them up and we are unable to find or make translucent glazes.

We'd like to somehow get one color in the leaf vien and another on the overall, kind of like water color.

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

 

 

 

I wish I had seen this thread earlier....

I do alot of leaves. I cut leaves from my grape vines and use a rolling pin to roll them onto my slab. After cutting the shape out of the slab (leaf still attached), I score and slip the back of the leaf and my piece (usually a cup, bowl or birdhouse) and apply the leaves. I use coils for vines.

I then bisque fire. The leaf burns off, leaving the detail. I then brush on a red or black iron oxide suspension, sponge off the extra and then glaze the leaves. I am partial to Amaco Dark Green, but most translucent glazes will suffice.

The iron oxide allows the detail to be visible. Leaving the leaf in place during the firing prevents the detail from being smudged out or distorted by handling. The result is very sharp, intricate and accurate leaf detail.

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Nancy S.    21

Back when I was in high school we relied on plain old underglaze with a clear glaze on top...we didn't fire the underglaze and then add the clear and fire again. We used the semi-moist pan underglazes in sets that resembled cheap watercolors, brushed them on with just enough water to make them flow, sponged off excess on higher areas, and let it dry before gently brushing (or sponging) on a few layers of clear. The only caveat is to be careful not to smudge the underglaze, since the wetness of the clear glaze may re-wet the dried underglaze and mess it up. I understand that's why someone suggested double-firing, but with school budgets what they are these days, I understand if that's not an option!

 

Good luck. :)

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Chukchi    0

Back when I was in high school we relied on plain old underglaze with a clear glaze on top...we didn't fire the underglaze and then add the clear and fire again. We used the semi-moist pan underglazes in sets that resembled cheap watercolors, brushed them on with just enough water to make them flow, sponged off excess on higher areas, and let it dry before gently brushing (or sponging) on a few layers of clear. The only caveat is to be careful not to smudge the underglaze, since the wetness of the clear glaze may re-wet the dried underglaze and mess it up. I understand that's why someone suggested double-firing, but with school budgets what they are these days, I understand if that's not an option!

 

Good luck. :)

 

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weeble    5

I've done all sorts of fun things with pressed in leaves. Simplest is an oxide wash wiped off with a damp sponge, terra sigillata takes a bit more of a delicate touch wiping it off, but works similar. Transparent glazes are a lot of fun too. Latest batch I did terra sig with some copper carbonate in it, wiped back, then a clear over. ZING! Going to have to do some more of those!

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Chukchi    0

These are made using hosta leaves . . . glaze is Opulence Celadon, cone 6, electric oxidation.

 

Those hosta leaves are very nice!

We have used a similar glaze with good results, but still are seeking to create that watercolor effect found on fall leaves.

Transparent glazes would be ideal for my students. Does anyone know of some companies that make them?

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Chukchi    0

Back when I was in high school we relied on plain old underglaze with a clear glaze on top...we didn't fire the underglaze and then add the clear and fire again. We used the semi-moist pan underglazes in sets that resembled cheap watercolors, brushed them on with just enough water to make them flow, sponged off excess on higher areas, and let it dry before gently brushing (or sponging) on a few layers of clear. The only caveat is to be careful not to smudge the underglaze, since the wetness of the clear glaze may re-wet the dried underglaze and mess it up. I understand that's why someone suggested double-firing, but with school budgets what they are these days, I understand if that's not an option!

 

Good luck. :)

 

 

What is a semi-moist pan underglaze?

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bciskepottery    925

Back when I was in high school we relied on plain old underglaze with a clear glaze on top...we didn't fire the underglaze and then add the clear and fire again. We used the semi-moist pan underglazes in sets that resembled cheap watercolors, brushed them on with just enough water to make them flow, sponged off excess on higher areas, and let it dry before gently brushing (or sponging) on a few layers of clear. The only caveat is to be careful not to smudge the underglaze, since the wetness of the clear glaze may re-wet the dried underglaze and mess it up. I understand that's why someone suggested double-firing, but with school budgets what they are these days, I understand if that's not an option!

 

Good luck. smile.gif

 

 

What is a semi-moist pan underglaze?

 

 

 

One of many possibilities . . . http://www.amaco.com/shop/product-461-semi-moist-underglaze-decorating-colors-lead-free.html

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weeble    5

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These tiles were done with on white clay, then bisqued to cone 05. I then sponged on some terra sigillata with mason stain in it (the three with green background and the top maple leaf tile)or iron oxide, then I gently buffed the terra sig. and sponged off the excess oxide so it popped the design. You can see I went back and added more color (blue against the green first layer) to the hydrangea flowers. You could add more color to the leaves in the same way, its easy to do and comes out very watercolor like. I finished these by firing to cone 5 in an electric kiln.

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oldlady    1,323

can you make your own glazes at the school? if so, check out the post i did today under Green going grey. it is a great glaze over handmade underglazes. i wish i knew how to post pictures, they came out great.

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Bobg    4

I make bowls with leaves in them. I first put the leaf in while still wet then put cobalt oxide on right over the top of the leaf. Bisque fire then put iron oxide on the leaf and wipe if off leaving quite a bit of iron oxide on the leaf. Let this dry and then clear glaze it. The iron oxide shows all the detail of the leaves.

 

Bob

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