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High School Ceramic Teacher

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Beginning this fall - I will be teaching 5 high school ceramic 1 classes to about 35 students per class. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions on how to organize my classes?

Would it be better to give a list of projects to students and have them work on their own? Or should we all do the same projects together?

Any lesson plan ideas??? The classes will run for 18 weeks then the classes will change to ceramics 2.

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If you're looking for lesson plan ideas, check out the Education section of Ceramic Arts Daily: http://ceramicartsda...org/education/ There are high school lessons posted there, and more will be posted by next Monday. As to your question on how to organize the classes, you could decide to either all work on one concept based project, with specific technique parameters, like limiting the students to using handbuilding techniques, or requiring that they try three different surface decoration techniques, or require that they all use the same technique (East Asian coil building for example--see the clip from the Joyce Michaud video on CAD:

http://ceramicartsda...coil-technique/ ) and design different pieces that would make sense to build/decorate using that technique.

As your time in the classroom is limited, I would probably limit the students to either the same projects, or to no more than three or four that are closely related, at least in the technique that the project addresses or covers, that way you can help all of the students by showing demos to the group that would benefit all of them. It would be hard to fit demos in for 35 students in one or two class sessions. Hope this information is helpful.

Jessica

Beginning this fall - I will be teaching 5 high school ceramic 1 classes to about 35 students per class. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions on how to organize my classes?

Would it be better to give a list of projects to students and have them work on their own? Or should we all do the same projects together?

Any lesson plan ideas??? The classes will run for 18 weeks then the classes will change to ceramics 2.

 

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If you're looking for lesson plan ideas, check out the Education section of Ceramic Arts Daily: http://ceramicartsda...org/education/ There are high school lessons posted there, and more will be posted by next Monday. As to your question on how to organize the classes, you could decide to either all work on one concept based project, with specific technique parameters, like limiting the students to using handbuilding techniques, or requiring that they try three different surface decoration techniques, or require that they all use the same technique (East Asian coil building for example--see the clip from the Joyce Michaud video on CAD:

http://ceramicartsda...coil-technique/ ) and design different pieces that would make sense to build/decorate using that technique.

As your time in the classroom is limited, I would probably limit the students to either the same projects, or to no more than three or four that are closely related, at least in the technique that the project addresses or covers, that way you can help all of the students by showing demos to the group that would benefit all of them. It would be hard to fit demos in for 35 students in one or two class sessions. Hope this information is helpful.

Jessica

Beginning this fall - I will be teaching 5 high school ceramic 1 classes to about 35 students per class. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions on how to organize my classes?

Would it be better to give a list of projects to students and have them work on their own? Or should we all do the same projects together?

Any lesson plan ideas??? The classes will run for 18 weeks then the classes will change to ceramics 2.

 

 

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Beginning this fall - I will be teaching 5 high school ceramic 1 classes to about 35 students per class. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions on how to organize my classes?

Would it be better to give a list of projects to students and have them work on their own? Or should we all do the same projects together?

Any lesson plan ideas??? The classes will run for 18 weeks then the classes will change to ceramics 2.

 

 

Is there a written curriculum for the Ceramics 1? I would think that would be the place to start. What are the tools the kids should have when they leave you as defined by the curriculum? Next what is your period time frame. My classes were 50 min. 5 days a week for 18 weeks.

 

I based the curriculum on techniques. Slab, coil, extrusion, pinch pot, combinations etc. Themes would change over the years. Some years I might beach something like house construction using slabs, of classical coil with templates and scraping. With extrusion I would often present 3-4 themes and let them choose the direction-crooked house, hard geometry, crazy plumbing. I think you get the point. All of the lessons were designed with the basics for the technique included: forming, joining, safety with tools, finishing, aesthetics of design and craftsmanship.

 

Now retired, the new teacher stays in touch, and still values my opinion.

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We love our High School 3D Pottery Teachers.

I would suggest you get yourself a Boy Scout Pottery Book

...Pottery BSA Supply No. 35934 ....

This little book costs less than $10.00 and has a wonderful way of putting a teaching aspect on pottery.

You will enjoy this as a teaching tool for terms and talents.

 

Also, be sure to align yourself with a Duncan Distributor. www.DuncanCeramics.com

They will have your clay, glaze, brushes etc.. and are a nice bunch of folks who have your interest at heart.

If you don't have a Duncan Distributor in your town feel free to call me. I help many teacher from across the country.

Your job is special. Later in life, all students remember their art teachers.

 

Pat Franz

405-634-6922

www.BercherCeramicSupply.com

Oklahoma City

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Beginning this fall - I will be teaching 5 high school ceramic 1 classes to about 35 students per class. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions on how to organize my classes?

Would it be better to give a list of projects to students and have them work on their own? Or should we all do the same projects together?

Any lesson plan ideas??? The classes will run for 18 weeks then the classes will change to ceramics 2.

 

 

 

I am absolutely jealous! I am a HS art teacher and can't even seem to get a kiln. Where are you teaching - town/state? Just curious. I'm in a Title I school in Dallas.

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I'm sorry but don't intitutions of higher learning teach pedagogy anymore???? I am trying to get my jaw up off the floor. Some of these questions in this thread and another are nothing short of amazing/amusing.

 

Regards,

Charles

 

 

they are also scary!

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I'm sorry but don't intitutions of higher learning teach pedagogy anymore???? I am trying to get my jaw up off the floor. Some of these questions in this thread and another are nothing short of amazing/amusing.

 

Regards,

Charles

 

 

Sorry, but it is spelled institutions. Yes, they teach pedagogy, but because the number of pedagogy credits required, and the number of studio areas out there, often a student has never had a Ceramics class, or maybe not a Jewelry class. I some cases I have seen Art teachers graduate from reputable universities that have piles of "pedagogy" but not a single 3D experience. It all depends on the structure of the universities curriculum. In the end, with little studio experience in certain areas, the future of Art in the schools may be limited more and more to 2D. Factor in budget constraints this day and age, and we have a growing problem. Just a side from an Old Educator.

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Beginning this fall - I will be teaching 5 high school ceramic 1 classes to about 35 students per class. Does anyone have any ideas or suggestions on how to organize my classes?

Would it be better to give a list of projects to students and have them work on their own? Or should we all do the same projects together?

Any lesson plan ideas??? The classes will run for 18 weeks then the classes will change to ceramics 2.

 

 

 

 

I know this was posted last year but was wondering how you were getting along in your new Ceramic Classroom? I have been working with Ceramic Art educators for a few years now and have some really great projects if your interested. All of these projects are geared for the budget conscience teacher. You can also look up projects on the Mayco Website at www.maycocolors.com you can contact me at pwyndham@maycocolors.com

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Almost all of the major glaze manufacturers have classroom projects and lesson plans for free download on their websites. Amaco, Duncan, Spectrum, and Laguna also all had teacher sections the last time I looked. What tends to be missing, however, from the 'project-based' approach is the unifying theme or philosophy that makes each project work for YOUR program. I'd suggest looking at them all so you can best find those that fit in your program.

 

Some often overlooked resources: your State's Art Educator website, NCECA, and NAEA. All Three are organizations who are dedicated to art and/or ceramics EDUCATION.

 

Above all, remember to teach to the STANDARDS. If a project doesn't meet one of your mandated goals, throw it out. Or, better yet, change the project so that it does. And lastly, buy your supplies from your local dealer. After all, THEY will be the one you run to in a pinch, or when you have questions.

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Several years ago while still living in the mountains and where I had been teaching 5th graders (how to play in the mud) for five years through the auspices of the local arts council, I received a call from the arts council director asking for my help. The high school and middle school both had new teachers that were required to teach ceramics as part of their curriculum, but they had only taken one semester of ceramics working towards their degrees. Seems they didn't know where to even start.

 

I spent five frantic days taking them through hand-building techniques, and refresher steps on wheel throwing. I was dumbfounded! I had thought a degree in art education was supposed to cover all aspects of art from design to a finished project--regardless of medium. It must have been enough to stay ahead of the students until the teachers could refine their skills, but it bothered me for a long time.

 

For many years, I had galleries refuse to consider my work because I didn't have a degree, therefore I had a thin resume. After teaching the teachers, my self-image got a big boost, and I decided a degree is like everything else in life--it's only as good as you make it.

 

I don't know how they work in Texas, but here in Idaho lesson plans must be submitted; be age appropriate; and show how the lessons can be integrated with the academic side of school (arts are electives and--sadly--being cut from every school budget).

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Several years ago while still living in the mountains and where I had been teaching 5th graders (how to play in the mud) for five years through the auspices of the local arts council, I received a call from the arts council director asking for my help. The high school and middle school both had new teachers that were required to teach ceramics as part of their curriculum, but they had only taken one semester of ceramics working towards their degrees. Seems they didn't know where to even start.

 

I spent five frantic days taking them through hand-building techniques, and refresher steps on wheel throwing. I was dumbfounded! I had thought a degree in art education was supposed to cover all aspects of art from design to a finished project--regardless of medium. It must have been enough to stay ahead of the students until the teachers could refine their skills, but it bothered me for a long time.

 

For many years, I had galleries refuse to consider my work because I didn't have a degree, therefore I had a thin resume. After teaching the teachers, my self-image got a big boost, and I decided a degree is like everything else in life--it's only as good as you make it.

 

I don't know how they work in Texas, but here in Idaho lesson plans must be submitted; be age appropriate; and show how the lessons can be integrated with the academic side of school (arts are electives and--sadly--being cut from every school budget).

 

 

When I began teaching in schools I had had many years of studio art experience ceramics being my specialty. So having knowledge of different mediums, studio set ups, etc., was not a problem. My problems occurred when I saw the limited supplies and support for the arts in the schools.

 

Here is an odd situation I ran into- I tried to get support from a school administrator for a small ceramics program just a very simple project of a bowl. It would have required a very small jewelry size kiln. It was to be presented to the students using all of the processes and terminology necessary to understand and complete the project. The room I had could have handled it as it was a huge space. I was also willing to incur all costs. It was rejected.

 

Well, when grade level testing time came around the first ten questions on the test were pertaining to the making and completion of a ceramic vessel. I wanted to scream.

 

I had another experience in a school that had as their art supplies large sheets of construction paper in the colors of browned aged edges of manila, orange and black. That was all there was in the supply room. Oh yes and a paper cutter.

They had a kiln but a teacher a few years back had ‘burned it out’, firemen were called, so no one was allowed to even try to fix it or go into the kiln shed again. It was padlocked.

 

So, having lesson plans + having the standards + no budgets + unknowledgeable teachers=?

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Well Pres I don't presume to be the world's greatest typist but if we are going to get into a discussion of English useage I'd like to see you diagram your sentence which includes the following "... I some cases I have seen Art teachers graduate from reputable..."

 

Best regards,

Charles

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Well Pres I don't presume to be the world's greatest typist but if we are going to get into a discussion of English useage I'd like to see you diagram your sentence which includes the following "... I some cases I have seen Art teachers graduate from reputable..."

 

Best regards,

Charles

 

 

Whenever I see a mistake in spelling or some such thing it does bother me a little also, but I suppose it is all those stern teachers I had in elementary school that whacked you on the hands if you made a mistake in spelling. I am trying to get over it slowly but surely. I try to ignore the mistakes and keep on reading but because this is a running critique here goes- usage.

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Well Pres I don't presume to be the world's greatest typist but if we are going to get into a discussion of English useage I'd like to see you diagram your sentence which includes the following "... I some cases I have seen Art teachers graduate from reputable..."

 

Best regards,

Charles

 

 

Whenever I see a mistake in spelling or some such thing it does bother me a little also, but I suppose it is all those stern teachers I had in elementary school that whacked you on the hands if you made a mistake in spelling. I am trying to get over it slowly but surely. I try to ignore the mistakes and keep on reading but because this is a running critique here goes- usage.

 

 

Wow!

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Lucille, you posted the following a while back: "Your welcome. The idea of the catalog I got from readings about Thomas Chippendale (1718-1780) the furniture maker and Andrea Palladio (1508-1580),..." while I ascribe my poor spelling to my bad typing there is an obscure saying about people in glass houses and all that....

 

Not being a native English speaker I have sometimes misspelled items and I probably have other bad habits also but I try to consider the content rather than the trappings, we all make mistakes: some of us even admit them. I am sure that your education included the difference between "your" and "you're" and so I would not diminish the value of your posts because of a minor typographical or grammatical error. Please note that I did not start this spelling bee, I was not the one who commented on the spelling of ceramics in the original poster's comment, I was merely pointing out in the post that yes mistakes in spelling and sometimes grammar are made but they are less important than the information contained in the comment.

 

I hope you can find in your heart the kindness to forgive a poor speller like myself but I may be mistaken. I promise I will try harder to be a better speller.

 

Best regards,

Charles

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Lucille, you posted the following a while back: "Your welcome. The idea of the catalog I got from readings about Thomas Chippendale (1718-1780) the furniture maker and Andrea Palladio (1508-1580),..." while I ascribe my poor spelling to my bad typing there is an obscure saying about people in glass houses and all that....

 

Not being a native English speaker I have sometimes misspelled items and I probably have other bad habits also but I try to consider the content rather than the trappings, we all make mistakes: some of us even admit them. I am sure that your education included the difference between "your" and "you're" and so I would not diminish the value of your posts because of a minor typographical or grammatical error. Please note that I did not start this spelling bee, I was not the one who commented on the spelling of ceramics in the original poster's comment, I was merely pointing out in the post that yes mistakes in spelling and sometimes grammar are made but they are less important than the information contained in the comment.

 

I hope you can find in your heart the kindness to forgive a poor speller like myself but I may be mistaken. I promise I will try harder to be a better speller.

 

Best regards,

Charles

 

 

 

Went checking on my posts eh? That proves my point. Seems like a vicious cycle. One corrects another, another corrects another, and on and on we go where it stops no body knows.

We all make mistakes. And sometimes spell check makes errors. You should see what it does with the verb ‘to be’. I didn’t mean to offend and you don’t have to defend. I am aware that we all make typos. Let’s just try to ignore them and move on. There are no teachers who will samck out handes. Oops, smack our hands.

By the way, thanks for the correction. I made the adjustment.

GEP likes this

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Lucille, you posted the following a while back: "Your welcome. The idea of the catalog I got from readings about Thomas Chippendale (1718-1780) the furniture maker and Andrea Palladio (1508-1580),..." while I ascribe my poor spelling to my bad typing there is an obscure saying about people in glass houses and all that....

 

Not being a native English speaker I have sometimes misspelled items and I probably have other bad habits also but I try to consider the content rather than the trappings, we all make mistakes: some of us even admit them. I am sure that your education included the difference between "your" and "you're" and so I would not diminish the value of your posts because of a minor typographical or grammatical error. Please note that I did not start this spelling bee, I was not the one who commented on the spelling of ceramics in the original poster's comment, I was merely pointing out in the post that yes mistakes in spelling and sometimes grammar are made but they are less important than the information contained in the comment.

 

I hope you can find in your heart the kindness to forgive a poor speller like myself but I may be mistaken. I promise I will try harder to be a better speller.

 

Best regards,

Charles

 

 

 

 

Went checking on my posts eh? That proves my point. Seems like a vicious cycle. One corrects another, another corrects another, and on and on we go where it stops no body knows.

We all make mistakes. And sometimes spell check makes errors. You should see what it does with the verb ‘to be’. I didn’t mean to offend and you don’t have to defend. I am aware that we all make typos. Let’s just try to ignore them and move on. There are no teachers who will samck out handes. Oops, smack our hands.

By the way, thanks for the correction. I made the adjustment.

 

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Yes, it's available so why not??? Checking past posts is a good way to get a feel of where a person is coming from and I see no restrictions on that. I believe that one shojld stand behind what one says: I do! As far as you having made your point I do not see that you offered any point to be made in your post. Your post appeared to me to be strictly an imprecation of my value as a poster because of my obvious ignorance of the English language. As I mentioned I did nto start this spelling contest and my only response to this thread was in regards to the study of pedagogics. Perhaps you should check out the "New Journalism" as taught by Tom Wolfe and others, you might enjoy the plasticity of English. There is even a difference in the spellings between American English and British English; which is correct? I am perfectly happy to ignore typos and move on, as I was from the beginning. I do however enjoy a spirited discussion, especially if there is a certain amount of verbal jousting involved.

 

Bests regards,

Charles

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My computer automatically corrects " raku" to "rake" constantly and I frequently don't notice what it has done. But I also make typos. I think the info is most important. I like the comments of kiln doc and Pres. I am about to re-enter the workforce in higher ed. The campus is in Tx. where they teach to the TAKS texas assessment of knowledge and skills.

I am apprehensive about this bureaucratic nightmare. I was not allowed to teach at the museum because the only wanted Texas certified teachers. In Montana the teachers training curriculum underwent huge restructuring to separate the pedagogy from the subject matter. Art teachers took the same concentration of courses as a BA major in History, Art or whatever their major was. Then everyone took pedagogy i.e. "how to teach" classes. I over simplify, but that was the general idea. I will keep you posted on my progress.

I feel Orwellian in this new direction.

Marcia

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Lucille, you posted the following a while back: "Your welcome. The idea of the catalog I got from readings about Thomas Chippendale (1718-1780) the furniture maker and Andrea Palladio (1508-1580),..." while I ascribe my poor spelling to my bad typing there is an obscure saying about people in glass houses and all that....

 

Not being a native English speaker I have sometimes misspelled items and I probably have other bad habits also but I try to consider the content rather than the trappings, we all make mistakes: some of us even admit them. I am sure that your education included the difference between "your" and "you're" and so I would not diminish the value of your posts because of a minor typographical or grammatical error. Please note that I did not start this spelling bee, I was not the one who commented on the spelling of ceramics in the original poster's comment, I was merely pointing out in the post that yes mistakes in spelling and sometimes grammar are made but they are less important than the information contained in the comment.

 

I hope you can find in your heart the kindness to forgive a poor speller like myself but I may be mistaken. I promise I will try harder to be a better speller.

 

Best regards,

Charles

 

 

 

Went checking on my posts eh? That proves my point. Seems like a vicious cycle. One corrects another, another corrects another, and on and on we go where it stops no body knows.

We all make mistakes. And sometimes spell check makes errors. You should see what it does with the verb ‘to be’. I didn’t mean to offend and you don’t have to defend. I am aware that we all make typos. Let’s just try to ignore them and move on. There are no teachers who will samck out handes. Oops, smack our hands.

By the way, thanks for the correction. I made the adjustment.

 

 

 

I too apologize for any "ruffled feathers" as I usually overlook spelling errors in favor of the content of the post. I stopped posting on this thread in hopes that it would return to the subject at hand. The sources listed that include the national and state art education organizationsshould help a lot. Don't forget that many times colleges post their curriculum's and are a good place to start, and get ideas.

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After many years in elementary art, I am now teaching HS Ceramics (3 sections) and Studio (3). I was disappointed to see that there were no posts added to your question. My students have been used to making magnets and stamps and I have been trying to start with handbuilding and would be interested to know what suggestions are available for the student who is 'done'.

 

 

 

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