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Horizontal Plaster Lathe


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#1 bdswagger

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 02:55 AM

Hi
I came across a very brief discription of a horizontal plaster lathe in Leon Nigrosh book "Claywork". Is anyone familiar with these? I'm looking for plans to build a homemade one-they look fairy simple in the photo. But I can't find anything on them online when I did a google search. Can anyone help me out?
Thanks
Leigh

#2 MichaelS

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 07:43 AM

Hi
I came across a very brief discription of a horizontal plaster lathe in Leon Nigrosh book "Claywork". Is anyone familiar with these? I'm looking for plans to build a homemade one-they look fairy simple in the photo. But I can't find anything on them online when I did a google search. Can anyone help me out?
Thanks
Leigh


Try a search for "plaster turning" I think that is what you are refering to.
I have also cast blocks and then turned them on my wood lathe.

#3 Diana Ferreira

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Posted 21 April 2012 - 01:07 PM

hi there Leigh
I use an ordinary pottery wheel to 'turn' my masters on. I made a huge plaster slab that fits around the throwing wheel, and use that surface to cut my molds. If you have a wheel, why not try this? If you want, contact me, and I will send you images of what I have, and give any advice you might need to use it.
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#4 INYA

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 03:03 AM

I am very satisfied with woodturning lathe (horizontal of course). It is great! I bought it from a guy who made it himself so it is not an industry woodturning lathe.
Another neighbour made me a nozzle that is attached to it and I pour a plaster cylinder on it.

The biggest diameter that I turned is about 10 inch but that depends on the strenght and diameter of the circular thing (that I don`t know the word of) see pic.

I can also turn plastic cast basic shape if I want really great positive that will not be destroyed in the process of mold making.

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#5 icyone

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 03:50 PM

I'm totally curious what they are used for.

I don't have enough info to find out by Googling either it seems

#6 INYA

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Posted 23 April 2012 - 02:13 AM

I'm totally curious what they are used for.

I don't have enough info to find out by Googling either it seems



They are used for making "positive" model from plaster (or plastic material or even wood...) for making a negative = mold. Model from other materials (non clay) have many advantages over clay.
Youtube:

- vertical turning

- horizontal turning

...
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#7 artsygirlms

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 10:14 AM

 

I'm totally curious what they are used for.

I don't have enough info to find out by Googling either it seems



They are used for making "positive" model from plaster (or plastic material or even wood...) for making a negative = mold. Model from other materials (non clay) have many advantages over clay.
Youtube:

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=DX88iorO8Pk - vertical turning

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=c1AMwzMhYYc - horizontal turning

...

 

thank you so much for posting this. i'm building a workbench this weekend for my garage. been having a horrible time trying to cast some things, and i am very interested in turning my own forms. 



#8 Chilly

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:37 PM

Don't forget a dust mask.  Plaster dust is not nice.


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#9 Pres

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 01:55 PM

Another thought here is to keep it as far as possible from any clay. :(


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#10 PeterH

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 03:01 PM

To state the obvious, a lathe will throw swarfe. Make sure that it cannot contaminate anything you will fire.

 

You may find the following book of interest (do a new search with your own country and currency)

http://tinyurl.com/qbqtyxf

http://tinyurl.com/p76jh8q

... it has an interesting way of setting up for the first cast, which minimises clay build-up at the expense of another plaster pouring.

 

Regards, Peter

 

 






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