Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
liambesaw

Electric quote seem fair?

Recommended Posts

18 hours ago, neilestrick said:

3 phase plugs use 4 prongs- 3 hots and a ground.

One might find a 4-prong "range cord" used on a single-phase 220v kiln, with the neutral not used, so it will plug into an existing 4-wire outlet that was originally installed for an electric range - typically a 40 or 50 amp circuit. 

I worked in a 'big-box' home center in the '90s, when the US electrical code started requiring 4-wire outlets for new installations.  Probably doesn't happen as much these days - but we sold a lot of 4-wire pigtails to people who were moving into a new (or newly renovated)  home, and taking a range or dryer they brought with them from their older house.  Even though the appliance only used 3 of the 4 wires, it still had to plug into a 4-wire outlet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Neutrals are required now here whether you use or need them at the box. As Neil said most kilns do not use them. Many wielders and other stuff does require them..Like he said some stuff needs the 110 part. Many electrical codes require a neutral at all locations now.

I always run them  to subpanels as I never know what I may hook up later to that box.Short round to  kiln  outlets do not matter.

 

Your crawling story remindes me of rewiring my Wife entire house from new service entrance to all the outlets . I left much of the overhead lights alone unless it was easy. The crawling was brutal but I was in my 50s when I tackled that job -more lean and mean then. New windows all around (I did that aas well)and new floors and doors-Insulated the whole structure as well-farmed some of that out. New  forced air heater, swapped out electic water heater for gas. Sold that house  fall  2017to friends and we are carring the note for awhile to ease the tax hit. It feels good to out of the rental business.

Edited by Mark C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

liam, congrats on getting it done but i have a question.  i live in a mobile home here.  it is aluminum sided where the electrical panel is on the inside.  recently had an electrician run a wire for an electric dryer 4 feet.  (i replaced my old propane dryer because it never seemed to turn off.)

he said the wire cost $60, (i think) and i wondered why so much for so short a run.   he bought the cable with the wire already inside it from HD and they only sell 25 foot rolls.  he said they do not sell romex and wire separately anymore.   the hardest part for him was fitting the hole for the wire inside the wall.  it had to go immediately next to the panel and run out to the porch where the washer and dryer are.   he rearranged a couple of circuits  in the box to get the new breaker in.  was here about an hour.   i think i paid him $120.  and maybe for the parts.  

my question for all you electric guys is  if the wire is sold in 25 foot boxes at the big stores, do the real electrical supply houses sell it by the foot?   seems like that would be a little less for a short run like mine was.   

can you tell i have plans for the studio?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Liam’s project was significantly more difficult than your dryer and his parts alone cost more than your entire bill. Of course he did do the job for about 300 dollars but spent a day running pipe under his house in the crawl space. If your guy spent a day putting your dryer outlet in I think he would have charged for that time spent

Edited by Bill Kielb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i am sorry that i was misunderstood.  i did not intend to criticize anyone or anything.   it simply sounded like liam used empty romex into which he put a wire.   that is apparently not available here anymore.  i probably misunderstood the electrician who i did hire by the hour.  

i am glad to know it is sold by the foot.

in any case, enjoy your new kiln, liam.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, oldlady said:

 it simply sounded like liam used empty romex into which he put a wire

Not sure what you're referring to as 'Romex'.   While it's commonly used (much like Kleenex or Band-Aid) as a generic term for 'Non-metallic (Type NM) sheathed wire', it's actually a brand-name.  It's also, as far as I know, never been sold empty, as the 'sheath' fits very tightly around the wires - like the outer jacket on an extension cord. 

Perhaps you're thinking of flexible conduit (either metal or non-metallic) ?  Depending on size, that can be purchased empty (sometimes by the foot, sometimes only in packages) - or, usually in shorter 'pigtail' lengths, with the wire already in it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.