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can frozen glaze be used once thawed?


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#1 centered

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 08:53 AM

I am currently setting up shop in Maine. I have many concerns about how to handle the cold. I realize wax resist can freeze and not be useful once thawed. What about glaze in buckets and bags of clay? The cost of heating the area when I am not in it would be too expensive. I am wondering what other cold weather potters do in this situation.

#2 Pres

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 09:14 AM

I am currently setting up shop in Maine. I have many concerns about how to handle the cold. I realize wax resist can freeze and not be useful once thawed. What about glaze in buckets and bags of clay? The cost of heating the area when I am not in it would be too expensive. I am wondering what other cold weather potters do in this situation.


I have usually had very little problem with frozen glaze, although of late I store it in the basement to keep it from freezing. When it freezes it will leave granular residue in the glaze, so you will need to strain it again to bring it back. I know that this changes the composition, but it has not bothered my finished pieces. It is a hastle to redo the glaze this way so storing in the basement works well for me now.

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#3 TJR

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 01:36 PM

You will probably notice from my handle that I am from Canada. Cold is my middle name, although the weather is unseasonably warm here right now. Freezing of clay is not a problem, but you have to rewedge as all the water comes to the surface. Glazes that are solidly frozen will take a long time to thaw, and a lot of energy. It's probably best to avoid freezing them by storing them in your basement or somewhere in you house.
I work in a heated cooperative studio until Jan 15, then I move to my dream studio that has heat in the floor.[It's a heated two car garage.]We try to work in heated spaces up here, just to avoid the hassle of constantly thawing materials. I hope this helps.TJR.

#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 01:45 PM

I never had any problems with glazes that froze except as TJR says, it takes a while to thaw them out. Best to store them someplace warmer.
Marcia

#5 neilestrick

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 10:09 PM

Often when glazes freeze and then thaw, they typically settle out to the bottom really badly. You'll likely have to dig them up, remix and screen them. They should be fine after that. When clay freezes and then thaws, you'll get a layer of really wet muck around the outside, and a firm middle. You'll have to wedge it up before using to get it evened out. Freezing causes a lot of headaches! This is why most clay companies wil not ship in the winter if they are having a really cold spell. I remember our loading dock filling up for a couple of weeks one especially cold winter when I worked for A.R.T. Clay.
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#6 Stephen Robison

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 11:46 AM

Should be fine. Screen it out again and use it. Use it on ONE piece and see! Frozen clay that is another problem. If clay freezes you really need to re pug or mix it.
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#7 TJR

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 01:02 PM

Hey, there;
I have been thinking about this topic quite a bit as I move into my heated studio. One thing you might try is a heated bucket for your glazes. They have these at farm supply stores for keeping water for cattle thawed. [I always want to say unthawed for some reason.]
Anyway, I have not tried this, but it is an electric bucket with an element in the bottom. Probably keeps the glaze above freezing.I have seen these in the Princess Auto catalogue. I am sure you can buy one for around $20.00.
Anyone try this?
TJR.

#8 centered

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 02:55 PM

Wow, thanks,the heated bucket sounds great. I will check it out.

#9 teardrop

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:55 PM

Heya centered.

An idea you might want to investigate is the same "technology" some people use to heat their outdoor dog houses in the Winter.... aka build a small "heater" that utilizes a 100 wattlight bulb inside a very well-insulated space. Some ideas how to construct something of the sort are on this page http://www.nodakoutd...hp?f=54&t=46653

good luck either way teardrop
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#10 Pres

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 07:56 PM

Heya centered.

An idea you might want to investigate is the same "technology" some people use to heat their outdoor dog houses in the Winter.... aka build a small "heater" that utilizes a 100 wattlight bulb inside a very well-insulated space. Some ideas how to construct something of the sort are on this page http://www.nodakoutd...hp?f=54&t=46653

good luck either way teardrop


That used to be possible, as incandescent bulbs put out a lot of heat. What about now that incandescent are being phased out? I guess Halogens would have to do, but I don't think they put out as much heat. Florescent bulbs certainly won't work. I have used incandescent bulbs in my refrigerator that I use for a wet box when I want to keep pots from freezing in the winter.

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#11 Mark C.

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 08:26 PM


Heya centered.

An idea you might want to investigate is the same "technology" some people use to heat their outdoor dog houses in the Winter.... aka build a small "heater" that utilizes a 100 wattlight bulb inside a very well-insulated space. Some ideas how to construct something of the sort are on this page http://www.nodakoutd...hp?f=54&t=46653

good luck either way teardrop


That used to be possible, as incandescent bulbs put out a lot of heat. What about now that incandescent are being phased out? I guess Halogens would have to do, but I don't think they put out as much heat. Florescent bulbs certainly won't work. I have used incandescent bulbs in my refrigerator that I use for a wet box when I want to keep pots from freezing in the winter.

Here in Ca. they have outlawed 100 watt bulbs but most other wattages still can be had-I use a 75 watt in our pump house during freezing weather to keep it warm-it does not take much to keep an inside space from freezing
The shed is a walk into size
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#12 teardrop

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 10:29 PM

if the space is inside a garage/etc....a smaller wattage lamp could be used......or if more light is needed...just add a second bulb. There are screw-in splitters that allow you to run 2 bulbs at once. I think the key is buidling an enclosure that is well insulated.

There is also "heat tape"....and many other heat sources that could be utilized in a closed in space to keep it from freezing.

I hope you find an economical solution, centered.


Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. Dr. Seuss US author & illustrator (1904 - 1991)

#13 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:51 PM

You could build a box or use an old refrigerator to store the glazes. install an older incandescent light bulb for heat

For clay, build an insulated Box and wrapped with an electric blanket.

#14 Slipped

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 01:33 PM

Old refrigerator or chest freezers are great, it's simple to run in a lightbulb and it produces plenty of warmth to keep the contents above freezing, I just use a 60 watt incandescent. I have a chest freezer to keep clay in, and only turn on the light if it's supposed to get below 20. Most of the time I don't worry with the glazes, it doesn't stay below freezing here for long stretches, I just mix well and sieve twice if it's been really cold, but Maine is a different story. The chest freezer with lightbulb is great for storing greenware and work in progress too (got to keep that above freezing), even in warmer months to prevent drying problems as a wet box (no need for the lightbulb then). Looking back if I could do it over I'd pick an upright though, it's a pain to get to the bottom. Posted Image

#15 plumbingamo

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 05:04 AM

You covered some good points here, I think a meaningful response is very important for comments.

#16 karan

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 08:18 AM

I have had luck with sieving my glaze after freezing. It is a pain though, take valuable studio time. And the clay... oh, what a pain! Had to re-wedge all the frozen stuff come spring thaw. Ugh. Not what I want to be doing in the studio! Luckily now, my studio is in my basement, and no longer in my outdoor shed! :-) Good luck! :-) Karan
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