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Leaving glazed pieces unfired

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How long can glazed pieces be left before firing?  days? months?  I have some pieces I've  glazed but as I am travelling, it may be a month before I can fire them. 

Also, as I do underglaze decoration and sgraffito I'd like to get some pieces ready, and simply have  them ready to dip them in clear glaze before firing.  Are the colors likely to be affected?

I just read some amazing advice on how to use hairspray or spray-on starch to prevent smudging of underglazes, oxides etc.  Can I then dip these items  (protected with starch or hairspray) into my  clear glaze would the hairspray / starch contaminate the glaze??  This seems like  a 'no-brainer'  as the oxides DO contaminate the glaze....and the hairspray / starch simply burns away in the firing....but as it seems too good to be true, I simply have to check.  

Despite a lot of advice from people like Marcia Selsor, glazenerd and others, I am still trying to make glazes that work.  This involves a few days of getting things ready for the kiln.  As I develop glazes that work, I'd like to have some things ready to fire, while I mix and test new recipes and combinations.  Hence the question about how long  glazed pieces can sit around before being fired.

as always - many thanks in advance!

 

 

 

 

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Chris Gustin sprays his pieces with some type of glue (regular white Elmers, I think) after glazing to protect the glaze from chipping off before firing. I think you could easily dip them if you do not have access to a sprayer.  Similar to using hairspray, which I have heard of. I'm not sure if either is better than the other

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If you're not moving the glazed pieces around a lot, you probably don't need to spray them with hairspray or anything else. That sort of thing is useful to do if you're transporting your work to be fired, but shouldn't be necessary otherwise.  The glazes shouldn't chip if they're just sitting on a shelf. 

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In my very little experience this is the first time I hear that is possibile to spray glazes with glue or hairspray to protect them... now I've no doubt that it's possible but really that stuff doesn't affect or spoil the glaze? Does not remain some carbonaceous residue or something else? Is there some precaution yo be taken? How much? I find it extremely interestive... unfortunately at the moment I don't own my kiln so I have to move my pieces with my car and invariably some piece arrive spoiled...

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On 12/15/2017 at 10:54 AM, andros said:

In my very little experience this is the first time I hear that is possibile to spray glazes with glue or hairspray to protect them... now I've no doubt that it's possible but really that stuff doesn't affect or spoil the glaze? Does not remain some carbonaceous residue or something else? Is there some precaution yo be taken? How much? I find it extremely interestive... unfortunately at the moment I don't own my kiln so I have to move my pieces with my car and invariably some piece arrive spoiled...

I have used spray shellac and hairspray to fix glaze in place to move pots. I have not noticed negative effects.  Glaze fire gets so hot that the organic material burns away long before the glaze actually starts to melt.

I do know that there is one glaze that might be affected by this treatment: carbon trapping shino.  Not because of the contents of the hairspray, but because of the movement of soluables in that particular glaze. 

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