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Pottery Knowledge Quiz Of The Week(Pkqw): Week 2

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Now,

 back to the main story:

 

1. c. dragonfly

2. none of the above.  the tool is called a ' two stick pick-it-upper"  and it works quite well. 
 
3. d. combs
 
4. b. fluting tools
 
The book was a nice read when I read it 10 years ago.  It confirmed that what you do with the resource you have available is more important than its looks or its name.
 
LT

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glazenerd    816

Without clay there are no pots. Without pots we do not need the tools Pres is asking us about. Einstein said it is all relative: one is not without the other.  Clay determines if a pot functions.

Nerd

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JBaymore    1,432

Huh? Google coughed up About 33,500,000 results; translations seemed to have something to do with the eyes of dragonflies. 

 

Auto-translation of Japanese is NOT very good.  ;)

 

best,

 

......................john

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JBaymore    1,432

John-

ç§ã¯åŒæ„ã™ã‚‹ã€ç§ã®å‹äººã€‚

 

本当ã«ã€‚ フレドã•ã‚“ã¯æ—¥æœ¬èªžã‚’話ã›ã¾ã™ã€‚僕ã¯ç„¡è‡ªè¦šã§ã™ã€‚

 

.....................ジョン

 

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JBaymore    1,432

Without clay there are no pots. Without pots we do not need the tools Pres is asking us about. Einstein said it is all relative: one is not without the other.  Clay determines if a pot functions.

Nerd

 

The quality of the pot determines if the clay it is made with even matters.  :)

 

best,

 

...................john

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Pres    896

Answer post: My apologies as I was not able to attach the images to help explain the dragonfly and the cradles. 

Week 2

  1. A ________________ is often considered to be the peak of the development of pot gauges as it allows the potter to measure multiple widths and depths of a series of pots using the same dimensions thus duplicating the form.

    a. butterfly

    b. bumblebee

    c. dragonfly

    d. caliper

The dragonfly is used much like calipers are used by machinists to check work in progress on the lathe. It functions:

  • To check the dimensions of a production pot during and after throwing to make sure it conforms to a master, or standard, pot. For unique forms, to check the height and width

    of a pot.

  • To check the dimensions of any pot, to make sure that it will fit into the available space in the kiln.

The dragonfly, in our opinion, is a peak in the evolution of the pot gauge;. . .

 

The dragonfly if a basically made up of two sticks that would allow an adjustable cross. by using the part top of the cross as a handle, the two horizontal arms measure the circumference of the pot where as the bottom leg measures the depth.

  1. ________________ are tools for lifting pots off of the potters wheel. The Japanese made theirs out of bamboo, and the process looks awkward to me, but then a culture that developed the chopstick for eating may find them easy. Others I have seem made of wood, metal and plastic, the material does not really matter only the efficiency. I personally don't often use them.

    a. cradles

    b. carriages

    c. handlers

    d. calipers

Cradles, sometimes called “lifters,†are tools for picking up thrown pots from the wheel. This is their only use, and there are various types and size of cradles for picking up almost any size of pot. They are most useful

for lifting large pots, virtually eliminating the need for bats. This speeds up and simplifies the process of throwing large forms and leaves the studio free of all the clutter associated with bats.

 

 

I have to admit that there have been times the I have used a pair of calipers to move a pot in a similar manner. Traditional Cradles are made up of two longish semi flexible sticks(bamboo often) that are placed on either side of the pot at the base, with a grip on either side like holding chopsticks the sticks are squeezed against the pot and lifted with a slight twist to free from wheel head. Newer designs are out using either metal, wood or plastic to grip at an undercut of the pot.

 

 

  1. A useful decorating tool that can be used to decorate greenware, slip covered greenware, or freshly glazed bisqueware is the ________________. It is a quick and easy way to create a pattern of parallel 2 or more lines on the pot. Hand made tools of this sort allow for a variety of lines of different spacing and depth. I use them when throwing on cylinders before shaping.

    a. needle tools

    b. fluting tools

    c. stamps

    d. combs

A comb is any toothed or pronged instrument that produces a pattern of two or more parallel lines when scraped across the surface of a pot. These marks resemble the pat-tern of combed hair, and the term is applied

to any instrument that produces them, not just tools that may be directly derived from thegrooming implement. Combing may be usedto produce a number of effects:

 

  1. Tools that allow for a series of parallel lines on a pot that appear to be similar to the tool in question 3 but are more of a deep incised process are __________ tools. This technique is very dependent on the form of the pot and the strength of the technique is in the rhythm and repetition of the process.

    a. needle tools

    b. fluting tools

    c. stamps

    d. combs

Fluting is the carving of a series of parallel or nearly parallel grooves on a pot one at a time, and with greater depth and spacing than the grooves produced by combs—combing writ large, so to speak. It is a kind of incising, though again, more clay is removed than is the usual practice with incised decoration. The marks produced are not spontaneous, curved or flowing, like comb marks, or the complicated designs, abstract or representational, of incising, but strong, clean lines that follow and accentuate the basic

shape of the pot.

 

Common fluting tools may be ribbon end tools or wire end tools with rounded, pointed or squared ends. There are a variety of fluting tools on the market, but many may be made by hand of wood, wire, strap metal or even plastic.

 

This weeks questions were taken from text in Handmade Potter's Tools, Wilford & Wong, Kodansha International, C-1986.

Edited by Pres
formatting did not come in from Open Office.

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Pres    896

today is Weeds-ness-day. :)

Time to move to week three.

 

LT

Answers to wk 2 are up, wk 3 is also posted. Thanks to all the participants, I hope you learned something.

 

 

best,

Pres

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Pres    896

sorry about that, I did not notice that the answer formatting highlighting the answer did not copy/paste over.

 

best,

Pres

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LeeU    330

Feels good to learn something (dragonfly) - especially when there is not a chemical formula or intricate process attached that one then becomes responsible for knowing and thus doing right by ! 

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Pres    896

Images would not come over with the text. I could probably copy/paste them.

 

Thanks for posting the pic of the butterfly in use. I like them a lot, especially when trying to throw the same item over and over.

 

best,

Pres

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