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SueDNim

Wooden Ribs And Rollers

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Mineral oil doesn't last very long when exposed to moisture. A better product would be Boiled Linseed Oil (not to be confused with raw linseed oil) which can be purchased at any big box store such as Lowes and Home Depot.

 

FWIW, mineral oil on a wooden cutting board makes the wood look nice, it doesn't protect the wood unless you reapply the oil after each and every use. Before you ask it does not rejuvenate the wood by penetration. At best the oil is only skin deep maybe 0.01" to 0.02" deep.

 

(When you think mineral oil think refined motor oil, do you really want that on your food?) 

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Olive oil. I do have boiled linseed oil and I think it may be cheaper than Olive oil. I prefer linseed oil for bats. I got some olive wood ribs in Italy and haven't oiled them. They are beautiful the way they are.

 

Marcia.

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a some of my early tools were rosewood. That seems to be what they were making them out of in the 60s. I still have some of them. I have my first french fingers, two of them and they are 50 years old. I don't use them one everything, just narrow holes on orbs or long necked bottle shapes or the flat end for textured patters.

They feel very elegant to hold.I never oiled them.

 

 

Marcia

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I used to be super sloppy with my tools and let the clay crust up on them, forget them in water. And they got ruined quickly. They dried out and cracked and split. These are the absolute cheapest tools you can get at Michaels'. 

 

Now I quickly wipe them off after throwing and put them upright in a little organizer. They dry out beautiful and I don't have to do anything to them. These are the same cheap tools. I haven't ruined any tools in a good long while. I'm even starting to let myself get better quality brushes and thinking about some really nice ribs because I know I won't ruin them in a week. 

 

Re: cutting boards: I have three bamboo cutting boards. I didn't like how dry and flaky they were getting so I melted some olive oil with a tiny bit of beeswax and once a month or so I heat it up and rub it all over them. Fabulous. And nothing harmful in beeswax or olive oil so if we ingest some, no problem. :) 

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a some of my early tools were rosewood. That seems to be what they were making them out of in the 60s. I still have some of them. I have my first french fingers, two of them and they are 50 years old. I don't use them one everything, just narrow holes on orbs or long necked bottle shapes or the flat end for textured patters.

They feel very elegant to hold.I never oiled them.

 

 

Marcia

 

What are "french fingers"?

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Well I do purchase food grade for my boards.

 

There is a misconception about food grade wood finishes helped by marketing experts, The truth is all wood finishes are food safe once they are CURED. Even if the finish is dry to the touch it may not be cured, it may take a bit longer. The way to know if the finish has cured is sniff it, if you can still smell the finish it isn't cured.

 

For cutting boards the best finish is no finish. Any type of oil or wax just makes it look pretty.

 

I do most of the cooking at home because I enjoy it. My cutting board is 25 years old and I have never placed a finish on it in all that time. It is still safe and sanitary. I might add there are studies that show wooden boards are more sanitary than plastic boards, even after the board has been through the dishwasher.

 

Olive is ok on cutting boards but like mineral oil it needs to be reapplied quite often. Be careful though, oil olive can go rancid on a board. Personally I think its better than mineral oil since mineral oil is used as a laxative.

 

Ron AKA WoodNerd :D

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my tools date from 1972.  keep them clean, it is easier to clean a little wet mud off one wooden rib 20 times a day than to wash 20 of them that have dried crud all over them.

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