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Will Electric Kiln Cool Too Fast On Cold Night, Outside?

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It's going to be in the twenties by morning. Kiln has already shut off earlier this evening. This kiln is not programmable. Is there danger of it cooling off too fast after bisque firing? I guess I could turn it back on low, but I'm not sure if this is necessary. And that would certainly extend my firing time.  How fast can a kiln cool down ( I don't mean by opening the lid) when the ambient temperature is frigid?  ja

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The difference between -10°C and 1200°C is 1210°C.

The difference between 20°C and 1200°C is 1180°C

 

So... at the high side there is essentially no difference. It will cool faster overall but this is more apparent at lower temperatures.

 

Funny, this question is also answered (sort of) by the current XKCD what if: https://what-if.xkcd.com/155/

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I fire out in the shop all year long. Sometimes I have to do it in the Winter, even though the shop is not heated. Nice thing is, I can work in the shop the day after a firing, as it is nice and warm. Firings do take a few minutes longer, but nothing to notice much. I fire up, and fire down, as I do not have a setter, and as this kiln is pre programmer, it is the only way to go. All firings done with cone pack and temp color. Fire at will in the icy cold, kiln won't mind. Sometimes a water smoke is warranted in the firing up, as you may have moisture in the kiln and ware.

 

best,

Pres

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Wha type of insulation?

A ceramic fibre kiln drops like a stone anyway, or mine did.

It really only affected the glaze firing.

Crucial stages for te clay are lower so I think it'll be fine

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The difference between -10°C and 1200°C is 1210°C.

The difference between 20°C and 1200°C is 1180°C

 

So... at the high side there is essentially no difference. It will cool faster overall but this is more apparent at lower temperatures.

 

Funny, this question is also answered (sort of) by the current XKCD what if: https://what-if.xkcd.com/155/

Hahahahaha! That link is hysterical!!

I have yet to be eaten by wolves while making outdoor freezer toast, but I don't live in Winnipeg, either. I have fired a few bisques, and a glaze load or two in minus 25C this year. As thermal mass does matter, an efficient pack for both is particularly beneficial, and like Neil says, just don't open the lid too soon. I usually give my 7 cu ft kiln with no electronic controller or temperature indicator 24 hours after it shuts off before I crack it, and you can usually unload it about half an hour later. I will say that unloading warm pots is a great deal more pleasant than loading the cold ones in those conditions.

Another tip: put the warm pots onto a wooden surface if possible. Don't put them on a cement floor.

bciskepottery and Min like this

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Greetings from Calgary, Alberta Canada. windchill today -25c

 

I am going to buy a kiln, not sure which make/model yet, but it will be an electric one. Can anyone offer some guidance on the following;

 

I intend to build a good garden shed with a poured concrete floor to house the kiln.  240 and 120 will be made available to the shed to satisfy the kilns floor requirement and 120 for a light and baseboard heater.  The shed will be butted up against the main residence.

 

What kind of kiln, a good large-ish one, would be best to use when it is going to live in a shed outside?

What will happen to the kiln when the temperatures drop to -30c or -35c for weeks at a time?

Should I insulate the walls and roof of the shed?

At what height should I build the ceiling and does it need a metal heat reflector on the interior, or can it just be wood?

Can the walls be wood or should they be drywall?

If I have 2 feet all around the kiln is that enough to prevent and fires to the shed? 

Is 20 feet away from the residences furnace fresh air intake enough so that the exhaust from the kiln will not interfere? The kiln will be direct vented to outside air.

 

I just want to be as safe as possible.  We just built a new house after having to demolish our old one due to the big flood in 2013 so I am a little nervous.  I am new to pottery and am really excited to get going and start firing my own work.  Any help or suggestions from anyone who lives in these temperatures would be very appreciated.

 

Many Thanks,

KOGD

 

 

 

 

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Good Morning,

 

I had to shake my head this morning when the weather guy said it was going to be possibly -45.  I was not sure if I heard it correctly or if I was still asleep.  Even the beavers are hiding out.  Ha ha

 

I would love to hook up and find out about your set up. You are also in Calgary I see.  I am not familiar with what a dm is.  I will try to reach you through your website.

 

Have a beautiful sunshine day. 

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