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I Need A Tutorial On Applying Iron Oxide To Bisqueware


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#1 HBLB229

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 03:12 AM

I have never really learned how to use washes. I take classes at a community college and I've seen some cool stuff come out of the kiln. When i asked how they got that effect, they said they brush on the oxide, then wipe it so it only stays in the texture.

I have tried this several times on my pieces and can't seem to get it to stay in the texture. It all washes away when I wipe it. Is my texture not deep enough? Iron not thick enough? Wrong wiping tool (we just have sponges)? Too much water?

Tried google but didn't find much.

#2 PeterH

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 08:05 AM

Two videos

 

Try varying how long you leave the oxide wash before wiping it off, and what you use to do the wiping.

Both of these can influence how much you remove, and the contrast between high and low areas.

 

Regards, Peter



#3 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 08:44 AM

Hi HBLB,
I have the same advice as the folks at the college, but with a couple additions.
-Brush or sponge it on thick. Don't cake it on, but apply liberally.
-Let it sit for a few. Allow the bisque time to absorb the water in your wash and for the iron to begin staining your piece.
-Wipe the wash away with a sponge, but make sure not to remove all the oxide. If you want the oxide to show up in the texture, make sure to leave some of it in the texture. Start with a clean sponge. Wring it out as much as possible... I've had the best luck using a sponge that is just the slightest bit damp. Rinse, wring, wipe, repeat as needed.
Good luck and post results!
Chris

Christopher Vaughn Pottery
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#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 09:07 AM

Mix the wash. dab it on with a sponge, wipe it off with a damp sponge . don't wash it off.
Works best with heavy texture.
Pretty much what they said.

marcia

#5 HBLB229

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 01:42 PM

Thanks!!

#6 NancyAmores

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 08:34 PM

I've had better luck using a slightly damp paper towel rather than a sponge; the sponge takes off more oxide at a time and dampens the entire surface too much. I make very small pieces though so it may not be practical for larger areas.



#7 Pres

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 09:14 PM

I often just use a damp sponge as others have said. However, if I intend to have greater contrast, I will hit some of the higher areas with sandpaper.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#8 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 06 April 2014 - 11:05 PM

Good tip, Pres. I'll try this.

Christopher Vaughn Pottery
Functional stoneware forms
handcrafted in Burlington, Vermont

 

www.ChrisThrowsPots.com

 

On Instagram @chris_throws_pots
 

 

 

 





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