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Refiring ^ 6 Stoneware At ^06


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#1 docweathers

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 12:14 PM

I've noticed that some people are getting some very nice results by refiring ^ 6 stoneware at ^06. Often the colors are are richer and more variegated.

 

Is there any logic to when this works and when it doesn't?


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#2 neilestrick

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 01:07 PM

It all depends on the glaze. I have one blue glaze that goes crystal white when refired at low temps. Better? Depends on what you like. Many iron reds also benefit from it, coming out more red and/or brighter. Often you can get a somewhat similar result from simply doing a slower cooling cycle. Again, depends on the glaze. Personally, I think a lot of the time the changes are only noticeable by us. The buying public wouldn't necessarily care unless it was so dramatically better that we could justify charging a higher price to cover the added labor and cost of doing a third firing.


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#3 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 02:05 PM

Neil, covered it, though I would like to elaborate on the iron reds. This refire to a significantly lower temperature is know as striking. Specifically in the iron heavy glazes, the iron is activated at higher temperatures and further fluxes out the glaze. It also imposes localized reduction on the glaze body, causing the higher temperature iron glazes to trend towards reduction looks, even when fired in oxidation. The second firing allows the iron to oxidize as the iron does not activate at the lower temperature. Specifically in iron glazes, striking can be extremely effective to reproduce very powerful reds. I can't speak to the cost effectiveness of the refire for production wares, but certainly if you need a really strong red for limited production pieces, striking is a good option.



#4 Chris Campbell

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 03:39 PM

That's really interesting Colby.

Could you direct us to some images that show the difference?


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#5 Colby Charpentier

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Posted 20 February 2014 - 03:54 PM

Hi Chris, I can try to grab some photos by the weekend, I couldn't easily find anything online, but I know we have some tests in the studio...

 

Edit: I've attached an image of two test tiles, where the one on the right was re-fired to show the effects of striking. Both samples were originally fired to c6.

 

 

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#6 Chris Campbell

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:10 PM

That is amazing ... I had never heard the term before but now I see how effective it can be.
Thanks for posting the pix.

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#7 Babs

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:55 PM

Did this by accident when touching up a pot with a iron rich glaze fired to C6, retouched  then refired it to C03, much more beautiful red, but it went from a high gloss to a satin matt



#8 Chris Throws Pots

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 03:39 PM

I just unloaded a "strinking" test from this morning's bisque. I sent pice which had been single dipped in an iron rich glaze and fired to ^6 back through a ^07.5/^06 bisque. Incredibly different results. I wish I'd taken a before picture for comparison. Before it was an ugly brown with spots of tomato soup red where the glaze was a bit thicker; high gloss finish.

 

It sounds like I have very similar results to Babs. Now it's a very consistent orangey-red with a slightly less glossy finish. I'm excited to now try a piece that had a nicer red glaze coat after the first firing and see how that compares. I'm on the hunt for a foodsafe true red.


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#9 Lorraine Adamson

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 10:16 AM

Hi Chris, I can try to grab some photos by the weekend, I couldn't easily find anything online, but I know we have some tests in the studio...
 
Edit: I've attached an image of two test tiles, where the one on the right was re-fired to show the effects of striking. Both samples were originally fired to c6.



#10 Lorraine Adamson

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Posted 03 March 2014 - 10:18 AM

Wow, I love both the cone 6 and the refined piece at cone 06. Would you be willing to share the glaze recipe that is on those pieces?




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