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Throwing Plates

Throwing plates

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#1 nancylee

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 07:34 AM

The bane of my existence is throwing plates. I have not been able to master this form, so I just don't sell them. But I would like to offer sets, and I don't want to use slip cast molds, especially because I know you can't bring stuff made with molds to most shows.

I have made plates by laying a slab of clay on a hump, cut around, softened the edges and put a foot on, but it doesn't ever fire without warping. Would I have better success with earthenware clay? Any hints you would feel you could share?

Thanks, much appreciated,
Nancy
Nancy
Northern Woods Pottery
www.northernwoodsstudio.blogspot.com

#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 08:05 AM

weigh out even amounts of clay. 4 to 5 lbs. See how much it takes for you.

Center the fist down to throw a pancake with a high center. Measure with calibers. 11" should be good f a smallish dinner plate for those cutting proportions and watching intake. or 12" for generous size dinner plate...all this depends on the lip design.

Try some various shapes with the same amount of clay. It is important to leave the center high for cutting it with a wire (hold tight) which will rise up in the middle. Also rib the surface to release pressure or tension to avoid spiral /wheel spoke cracks. Have a hefty lip to help against warping. When trimming transfer to another bat by flipping on a bat sandwich. When drying flip the same way. use soft foam to support the center if it is soft and wants to sag when upside down.

 

Practice and find a shape and size and lip, and thickness that works for you. Look foursome you tubes maybe right here on CAD. Found a good one:

 

http://ceramicartsda...-pottery-wheel/

 

Marcia



#3 nancylee

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 10:39 AM

Thanks, Marcia! I am going to practice this weekend!
Nancy
Nancy
Northern Woods Pottery
www.northernwoodsstudio.blogspot.com

#4 Wyndham

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 10:54 AM

As Marcia said and also watch some youtube videos on throwing plates.

When you pancake the clay to 11 or so inches, you can gently run a wooden trim tool under the clay to lift and form a thick rim to pull up. For me I form my clay wall at 10 inches. I pull till I get a wall about 1.5-2 inches.

At this time I use the trimming tool to clean my outside clay wall and  cut a  slight bevel at the base so the wire will have an easier  attack point.

After this, using a rib and supporting the outside  with my left hand with a sponge , I lay the wall over to be the rim of the plate. This give me about a 1/2 in to 3/4 in space from the bat to the underside of the plate rim, then cut off.

Practice on smaller bread & Butter plates or spoon rest, about 1 to 1.25 lb to get a smooth technique then work up to 4 lb size.

Hope this helps.

Wyndham



#5 Mark C.

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 11:41 AM

This has been covered well here

http://community.cer...ware#entry35738


Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#6 neilestrick

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 12:13 PM

Throw a pancake, rib the heck out of it to compress and smooth it. Then dig under the outer edge and pull up the lip. The deeper the dig, the bigger the lip. Pull it almost straight up. Then lay it out with a wooden rib. YOu can either smooth the lip into the center, or leave it defined for a gallery lip. Compress the edge of the lip a little after laying it out. Cut it loose from the bat. Then wrap the lip with plastic- I use 'Caution' tape. This will keep the lip from raising up as it dries. Leave the center uncovered for 2 or 3 days till it's leather hard. Then unwrap the lip, flip it to dry more if necessary, and trim. I work in porcelain and throw my my plates to 12.5 inches, so they shrink down to about 10.5. Wheel time for throwing is less than 2 minutes. For trimming I first scrape down the top with a metal rib to get it super smooth. It's easier than trying to get it smooth when throwing.


Neil Estrick
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neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 12:27 PM

This has been covered well here

http://community.cer...ware#entry35738

Yeah, same person, Nancylee,  asked the question about plates. I think she knows this. She is still having a hard time.

Marcia



#8 nancylee

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 04:24 PM

That's funny, Mark!! Sorry I didn't look it up. I guess I haven't figured it out since my niece's engagement, which is why I was asking about handbuilding them!! 

 

Sorry,

Nancy


Nancy
Northern Woods Pottery
www.northernwoodsstudio.blogspot.com




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