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pattial    13

Apparantly, my green ware was bisqued in a glaze kiln ,,,,,, :/. No I didn't do it. I belong to a kiln and someone else loaded it. They left a note on my pottery saying they didn't think I could glaze it now. Please say this isn't true. It was quite a few pieces.

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mregecko    18

They were half right. It's DIFFICULT to glaze it now.

 

Since the clay has been vitrified, it's hard to get glaze to stick to the surface.

 

Your best bet is to heat the pieces... I've done it with a heat gun for touching-up spots, some people do it in an oven, and some people will put them in a kiln on low.

 

While the pieces are hot, you'll have better glaze adhesion. It's still difficult, but less so.

 

Good luck!

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Chris Campbell    1,088

Mregecko is right ... Just heat them in a warm oven ... Maybe 200F and then glaze them. Watch out because you can easily apply too much glaze this way. Once the base glaze is on it is easy to layer glazes without heating them.

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pattial    13

Ooo I was hoping they were wrong. Ok no oven in guild. An instructor used to use our microwave to dry his pieces before trimming them I think I'll try that and see If it works Thanks

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Bill T.    4

I was trying the same, heating in a microwave to reglaze.   Blew it up, not really but it popped and quite working.  That was an expensive $15 pot.  Now I use a heat gun with the pot rotating . For a bunch of items I would be likely to use our gas oven or even the kiln to about 200 F.  

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bciskepottery    925

If you use a microwave, put water inside the pot . . . a bare, empty pot will overheat or get too hot to handle. Microwaves generate heat and cook things by agitating/exciting the water molecules within the item being cooked.

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TJR    359

I wouldn't put anything in a microwave but food that you intend to eat. I also would not put food in a kiln. I knew,repeat knew an art teacher who died of cancer of the throat. He cooked garlic sausage in his school kiln at lunch.

Get a heat gun, or put pieces back in the kiln on low.

TJR.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

Try heating it up with a heat gun and dip into a glaze with tongs. You may have to reheat and re dip, but you should be able to build up a thickness of glaze on your pieces.

 

Marcia

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Babs    386

Sounds like your workshop needs to have defined areas for  ware for different processes, does your group do raw glazed firing or was a complete novice operating the kiln? Either way sounds like some organization/ ground rules need to apply other wise some one will just use anything around to fill up the kiln so whatever firing they want to get on with is commenced!

Very disappoining for you. ANd I am amazed some of your raw ware did not get completely distroyed when taken up in a glaze fining.

This needs to be sorted out otherwise you could have ongoing issus about:people handlimng or mishandling your work, and worse still, as has already happened to you.

My commiserations.

Poor second, but have you thought of perhaps painting or even mosaicing onto your pots, or any other type of finishing process, what cone did your fellow kiln user take the pots up to? :unsure:

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pattial    13

Thanks for the replies everyone. I will try the microwave with water in the pots first. If that doesn't work I'll try to find a heat gun . I also do stained glass and have made mosaics before but unfortunately the shapes won't work this time.

I learned a little more info on what happened to the load. She was doing a bisque load the kiln and then proceeded to fire them all to cone 5 We do have defined areas in our guild. I guess this was just one of those moments

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

heating in the microwave with water means hey will be wet. Opposite of what yo are tying to do. Yo wan the pieces hot and dry for the glaze to stick. Put them in the oven.

Marcia

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bciskepottery    925

If you use a microwave, put water inside the pot . . . a bare, empty pot will overheat or get too hot to handle. Microwaves generate heat and cook things by agitating/exciting the water molecules within the item being cooked.

 

My bad . . . reheat bisque in an oven, not microwave.  Was  thinking of a former student who wanted to reglaze a bowl; told him to heat it in the microwave, then do his glaze dip.  He did, but the ware nearly burned him -- he heated it empty and for too long. 

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pattial    13

I brought them home tonight. I glazed everything after heating them in my oven. So far so good. I will be transporting them back to the studio tomorrow.

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Babs    386

Thank you, thank you for the link. I  get called to do ceramics units  of work for schools and absolutely freak when transporting students work home, it's always other peoples' work or commissioned stuff that gets you!

Good luck with the refiring! I was going to suggest trying just one piece, and then getting on and producing some new stuff. When the wound is not so raw and you have some more beautiful pots in your life, go back to the overfired bisque and play a bit...., or build something in the garden with them.

Good luck!

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