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Glazing On Lace Pottery


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#1 Laurarose

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 11:40 PM

Has anyone had experience glazing pottery made from lace or doilies? If so, how did you glaze?  Did you use underglazes?   I think they could be very pretty if I could just figure out the best way (or different ways) to glaze them.  I'd love to hear from anyone who has any suggestions.  Would you underglaze first, fire it and then put a glaze on top? 

 

Thanks

 

PS.  I don't know where to post this question but I really wish the search feature  would let you search on words less than 6 characters. 



#2 justanassembler

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 01:21 AM

a google search for "lace draping" might yield results you're looking for-it was a technique common to german porcelain dolls, adopted by china painters in other places as time went on.



#3 jrgpots

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 01:22 AM

Whenever you glaze them, I would use an airbrush. Dipping them might work as well. I would avoid brushing since they are so fragile. The real problem will be how you place them in the kiln for glaze firing. It's not a problem if you have jewelry stand or bead rack. You can hang them. Otherwise, it's gonna be hard.

#4 Newbiecw

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 10:49 AM

I am fairly new to pottery, but have a couple of suggestions. One, look up Maggie Weldon. I can't find glazing advice for her pieces, but you may get some inspiration. Second, I have tried this: impress a doily (I used a plastic one) in a slab of clay. When the slab is completely dry, brush underglaze (2 or 3 coats) on the doily section, if the whole piece isn't impressed. Let dry, then use a green scrubby and/or damp sponge to wipe off the excess, leaving the underglaze only in the pattern. After it is bisqued, brush on one quick coat only of watered down clear glaze. This is important! If you dip the piece or brush on too much, the underglaze color will "bleed" out of the lace design. Hope this helps!

#5 oldlady

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 04:53 PM

i have a very old book showing this technique.  the author stressed the importance of using cotton lace, not a synthetic.


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#6 neilestrick

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 06:05 PM

One of my students does a lot of lace pots. All of her glazes are dipped. You just need a glaze that will break nicely to highlight the texture. A transparent gloss glaze will look great. Don't over think it.


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#7 mdegruch@att.net

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 09:09 PM

I have been doing this recently using an air brush. Apply the first glaze to the pot either dipping or spraying and let it dry.

 

Window lace with a nice open pattern makes a good mask. Lay it across the pot so it is in contact with the pot. Any gaps between the lace and the pot will result in fuzzy results. I use paper clips to hold the lace closed around the back of a cylinder. Remember that you will need to remove the lace without disturbing the glazes. Dampening the lace first may make it adhere to the pot.

 

Apply the second glaze using an airbrush. Apply enough glaze so the pattern will persist but not so much that it smudges when you remove the lace or to have it run during firing. I remove the lace immediately and let the second glaze dry. Then using a needle tool, clean up any smudges.

 

Results will vary depending on the glazes. Obviously, using glazes that run would not work though it might create some interesting results.

 

Good luck.

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#8 oldlady

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Posted 10 August 2013 - 10:15 AM

have tried this and admire your teapot glazing. it is so well handled, how do you keep the pattern so crisp when the shape is so angled/

 

it appears that the original post is not talking about glazing but actually firing the piece of lace.  grandma had ladies with lace skirts that were ruffles of actual fired clay.

 

is this what you are trying to do?


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