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Experience with Mayco Jungle Gems and other commercial "crystal" glazes?


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#1 Nancy S.

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 08:59 AM

Does anyone out there have any experience with commercially-made "crystal" type glazes, like Mayco's Jungle Gems? I love the way the sample tiles look (of course) -- especially "Grape Divine" -- but I don't yet have my own kiln and am limited to whatever ^6 glaze firing that is done at my local studio. So fancy ramping and soaking is totally out of the question. Can one get the same results from just a typical ^6 firing with these products? Or are the special programs required, as with the crystalline glazes I've seen?

I don't have the equipment or the wherewithal to make my own glazes yet, so I am limited to what's available commercially. I know it's an option to buy a jar and do a test tile, but I figured I'd check here first because I'd rather not fork out $20-30 (including shipping) for a pint of glaze that won't work for me and that I can't use...pottery is a hobby for me, and funds are limited.

How runny/stable are they? (Should I make an extra tray to catch the drips, or plan to grind?)

I know you need to stir them up well because the crystals (aka crushed glass for some types) settle to the bottom. Are the crystals obvious, so that if I wanted to place one specifically I could do that?

Any other things I should know about - good, bad, or indifferent?

Any input is appreciated!


[ETA: Shoot, I just noticed this is in "In the Studio." Probably should be in "Clay & Glaze Technical." I'm not sure how to fix that, but if a CAD person can, feel free to do so! Thanks!]

#2 trina

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 10:05 AM

Hi there,


I have used the fire cracker and the sassy orange. You need to apply them thickly, they don't seem too runny, at least I have not had problems with that. If you look in my gallery, the sperm whale pod has some squid which are painted in the sassy orange (which actually is bright yellow).

I only bought the smallest jars available as the colours are really screamy bright. I only use them in small doses.

The glass crystals are very small and I have had no problem with the application. They are the size of big ish sand, so you can more them to a certain extent.

Hope that helps...T


P:S No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.

#3 Mart

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 10:16 AM

Does anyone out there have any experience with commercially-made "crystal" type glazes, like Mayco's Jungle Gems? I love the way the sample tiles look (of course) -- especially "Grape Divine" -- but I don't yet have my own kiln and am limited to whatever ^6 glaze firing that is done at my local studio. So fancy ramping and soaking is totally out of the question. Can one get the same results from just a typical ^6 firing with these products? Or are the special programs required, as with the crystalline glazes I've seen?

I don't have the equipment or the wherewithal to make my own glazes yet, so I am limited to what's available commercially. I know it's an option to buy a jar and do a test tile, but I figured I'd check here first because I'd rather not fork out $20-30 (including shipping) for a pint of glaze that won't work for me and that I can't use...pottery is a hobby for me, and funds are limited.

How runny/stable are they? (Should I make an extra tray to catch the drips, or plan to grind?)

I know you need to stir them up well because the crystals (aka crushed glass for some types) settle to the bottom. Are the crystals obvious, so that if I wanted to place one specifically I could do that?

Any other things I should know about - good, bad, or indifferent?

Any input is appreciated!


[ETA: Shoot, I just noticed this is in "In the Studio." Probably should be in "Clay & Glaze Technical." I'm not sure how to fix that, but if a CAD person can, feel free to do so! Thanks!]



Crystalites and Jungle Gems, were designed to fire to cone 06! http://www.maycocolo...=209&Itemid=113

#4 MichaelP

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 03:03 PM

No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.

Don't they require a significantly slowed down cooling rate/soaking down to 760C to form crystals?

#5 clayshapes

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 03:44 PM

I use these glazes in limited amounts all the time too. No special firing schedule required. I've even experimented using them to cone 6 on stoneware, with different, but good results. I especially like peacock green in small amounts. Am attaching a piece that this was used on, -- to cone 05 or 04 (can't recall) on white earthenware. It's the kind of mottled and glassy glaze on this piece.

Attached File  DSC09524.JPG   468.12KB   49 downloads

You can see more pictures of it here: http://www.etsy.com/...tion/111929100?

#6 Nancy S.

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 05:28 PM

Crystalites and Jungle Gems, were designed to fire to cone 06! http://www.maycocolo...=209&Itemid=113


The site where I found them (http://www.baileypot...ndex.htm#Glazes) says "Wide Firing Range: 06-6" -- which *does* seem really odd to me, but I am by no means a glaze expert! My first thought was "Wait, what?" and then I shrugged and thought, "Okay, then!"

Have you ever tried them?

#7 Nancy S.

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 05:29 PM


No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.

Don't they require a significantly slowed down cooling rate/soaking down to 760C to form crystals?


They aren't "Crystalline" glazes....these use bits of glass that melt instead of the kind of crystals that need to form and grow. (Don't get me wrong....one day, I do want to try crystalline glazes. But not today.) ;)

#8 Nancy S.

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 05:32 PM

Hi there,


I have used the fire cracker and the sassy orange. You need to apply them thickly, they don't seem too runny, at least I have not had problems with that. If you look in my gallery, the sperm whale pod has some squid which are painted in the sassy orange (which actually is bright yellow).

I only bought the smallest jars available as the colours are really screamy bright. I only use them in small doses.

The glass crystals are very small and I have had no problem with the application. They are the size of big ish sand, so you can more them to a certain extent.

Hope that helps...T


P:S No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.


Good to know!! Thank you!

Ever try them at ^6?

#9 Nancy S.

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 05:34 PM

I use these glazes in limited amounts all the time too. No special firing schedule required. I've even experimented using them to cone 6 on stoneware, with different, but good results. I especially like peacock green in small amounts. Am attaching a piece that this was used on, -- to cone 05 or 04 (can't recall) on white earthenware. It's the kind of mottled and glassy glaze on this piece.

Attached File  DSC09524.JPG   468.12KB   49 downloads

You can see more pictures of it here: http://www.etsy.com/...tion/111929100?


Lovely! Do you ever have glaze compatibility issues when it's right up against another glaze?

And what do you mean by "different"? Muted colors, more running?

#10 clayshapes

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 06:07 PM

The colors are quite different. That peacock green cone 6 is a golden brown - but a transparent one -- when it touches the satin finish white I often use with it at cone 6 -- it turns aqua green. I use it to paint out stems and leaves on my decorative botanical pieces.

I haven't had any serious glaze compatibility issues - many of these jungle gems are meant to craze -- and they do. Just be careful about too many coats - I expect it would run if it were layered on. I rarely do more than one coat. But you'll need to experiment. I realize you are concerned about ruining kiln shelves - so be careful! I have my own kiln -- if glazes run, I chalk it up to experimenting, and buy a new kiln shelf (very inexpensive - $23 for the size I need).

#11 Claypple

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 07:44 PM

If glazes run, I chalk it up to experimenting, and buy a new kiln shelf (very inexpensive - $23 for the size I need).


You do not have to do that if you use a coaster. I bisqued a couple of squares/flat plates and usually place them as a coaster under the risky vessel (the one that potentially can run) when I do glazing. If it does run, all you have to do just break the coaster and release the vessel. I reuse the coaster again and again.

Theoretically, you can even cover the coaster with the kiln wash if you want to be sophisticated.

#12 clayshapes

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 07:49 PM

Do you make the coasters? Same cone clay you are firing? I like the idea of being sophisticated and kiln washing them!

#13 Claypple

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 08:27 PM

Do you make the coasters? Same cone clay you are firing? I like the idea of being sophisticated and kiln washing them!


Yes, I make them out of any leftover clay I have. I bisque them at ^04 before I use them as the coasters.
I used them at low ^, high ^. One started cracking (fired it 5-6 times already), but who cares. Will make another one when this gets broken.

#14 MichaelP

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Posted 08 June 2013 - 10:14 PM



No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.

Don't they require a significantly slowed down cooling rate/soaking down to 760C to form crystals?


They aren't "Crystalline" glazes....these use bits of glass that melt instead of the kind of crystals that need to form and grow. (Don't get me wrong....one day, I do want to try crystalline glazes. But not today.) Posted Image

I got it. Thanks Nancy.

#15 trina

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 07:35 AM


No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.

Don't they require a significantly slowed down cooling rate/soaking down to 760C to form crystals?


Hi, since the crystals are actually just glass bits, no crystals are really being formed like in a crystaline glaze. The glass bits just melt and thats it. so no special cooling required...T

Sorry question already answered...I just read down to the end now T

#16 trina

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 07:43 AM


Hi there,


I have used the fire cracker and the sassy orange. You need to apply them thickly, they don't seem too runny, at least I have not had problems with that. If you look in my gallery, the sperm whale pod has some squid which are painted in the sassy orange (which actually is bright yellow).

I only bought the smallest jars available as the colours are really screamy bright. I only use them in small doses.

The glass crystals are very small and I have had no problem with the application. They are the size of big ish sand, so you can more them to a certain extent.

Hope that helps...T


P:S No special firing required I fire them up to 1020 C.


Good to know!! Thank you!

Ever try them at ^6?


I have fired them anywhere from 980C to 1020C.... it depends on what other glazes i fired with. T

#17 Nancy S.

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Posted 09 June 2013 - 11:56 AM


If glazes run, I chalk it up to experimenting, and buy a new kiln shelf (very inexpensive - $23 for the size I need).


You do not have to do that if you use a coaster. I bisqued a couple of squares/flat plates and usually place them as a coaster under the risky vessel (the one that potentially can run) when I do glazing. If it does run, all you have to do just break the coaster and release the vessel. I reuse the coaster again and again.

Theoretically, you can even cover the coaster with the kiln wash if you want to be sophisticated.


Yep, the studio that fires my pottery already does the coaster thing. I'm more concerned about it running because I just want to know what to expect.

#18 Nancy S.

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Posted 31 August 2013 - 07:25 PM

You can buy these metal oxide "crystals" from the largest producer, Rabco Specs, just like Mayco does.

 

http://www.rabcospec...t.cfm/cat/10879

 

The largest consumers of these crystals are tile manufacturers.

 

The color blooms to a bigger diameter at ^6 than ^06.  Some contain oxides which will boil-off as you get closer to ^10.

 

Ooo! I will have to look into that.

 

If anyone is interested, I have tried the 'Grape Divine' and like the results - it's not runny, is a nice pale purple with yellow spots. I'd add a photo here, but the dang thing just won't work. Here's a link to my ^6 "test kitty" -- http://img.photobuck...y/testkitty.jpg



#19 ayjay

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 01:48 PM

Does anyone out there have any experience with commercially-made "crystal" type glazes, like Mayco's Jungle Gems? I love the way the sample tiles look (of course) -- especially "Grape Divine" -- but I don't yet have my own kiln and am limited to whatever ^6 glaze firing that is done at my local studio. So fancy ramping and soaking is totally out of the question. Can one get the same results from just a typical ^6 firing with these products? Or are the special programs required, as with the crystalline glazes I've seen?

I don't have the equipment or the wherewithal to make my own glazes yet, so I am limited to what's available commercially. I know it's an option to buy a jar and do a test tile, but I figured I'd check here first because I'd rather not fork out $20-30 (including shipping) for a pint of glaze that won't work for me and that I can't use...pottery is a hobby for me, and funds are limited.

How runny/stable are they? (Should I make an extra tray to catch the drips, or plan to grind?)

I know you need to stir them up well because the crystals (aka crushed glass for some types) settle to the bottom. Are the crystals obvious, so that if I wanted to place one specifically I could do that?

Any other things I should know about - good, bad, or indifferent?

Any input is appreciated!


[ETA: Shoot, I just noticed this is in "In the Studio." Probably should be in "Clay & Glaze Technical." I'm not sure how to fix that, but if a CAD person can, feel free to do so! Thanks!]

I've used a couple of the Mayco "Elements Chunkies" ( similar to the Jungle Gems)  back when I had an old kiln that couldn't quite make ^6 - they worked OK but are only meant to go to ^06 (which is what I fired them to).

 

There is a guide on each pot of what the result will be if fired to ^6,  none of them sound as good as intended at ^06 and on some the crystals will just burn out (according to the blurb).



#20 Nancy S.

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 03:15 PM

 

I've used a couple of the Mayco "Elements Chunkies" ( similar to the Jungle Gems)  back when I had an old kiln that couldn't quite make ^6 - they worked OK but are only meant to go to ^06 (which is what I fired them to).

 

There is a guide on each pot of what the result will be if fired to ^6,  none of them sound as good as intended at ^06 and on some the crystals will just burn out (according to the blurb).

 

Yes - and also in my travels I found a website (http://www.creativeg...crystalites.htm) that describes the ^6 results for each. But the specks are more yellow than in the ^06 sample chip shown, and they don't tell you that! ;)






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