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cone 6 horsehair glaze?


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#1 docweathers

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:31 AM

Is there some way to get the horse hair affect at cone 6 rather than raku?

Larry

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#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 07:41 AM

Doc,
Horse hair is done around 11-1200 F well below raku temperature. It is done on a very porous surface where is can carbonize into it by actually applying the hair to the hot surface.

At cone 6 the clay should be vitrified. I don't know how you would plan to apply the horse hair to the surface. It would burn up way before cone 6.
So the answer to that question is no.

Rabbit hare's glaze yes. But I don't have a recipe.


Marcia

#3 Denice

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:11 PM

You might try a test where you refire your Cone 6 piece to 1100-1200F and place the horse hair on it. Maybe the glaze will get soft enough for the horse hair to melt and stick to. Denice

#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:29 PM

I think the thermal shock to a cone 6 vitrified body would crack the piece.

marcia

#5 neilestrick

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:20 PM

The glaze would not soften enough, and I agree with Marcia that it would crack. For horsehair to work the surface must be hot enough to ignite the hair, porous enough to take in carbon, but not so hot that it will burn the carbon out. Glazes or vitrified clay can't meet those criteria. You could fake it with airbrushed underglazes, if you're really good with an airbrush.
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#6 docweathers

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 01:37 PM

Oh well, but thanks for all the information about the dynamics of the problem.

Larry

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#7 AtomicAxe

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 05:14 PM

Most of the horse hair pieces I see is a terra sigilatta (spelling is off I know) process due to the ability to polish the piece before firing and keeping it after firing. You can raku pieces that are vitreous (fired more than a few pieces raku that were cone 10 initially) ... you just need to not force the cooling process ... with standard raku, keep it in the reduction chamber WELL past when you think it's cool ... then wait some more. As for horse hair ... you may be able to do it ... only ... any slip you apply to your vitreous piece will have to deal with the thermal expansion and contraction of not just the slip, but also the piece as well ... so more than likely i'm going to say that without going for a fluxing slip (which won't work with horse hair right) ... no ... not really possible. Then the second factor you will need to deal with is how to prevent the piece from rapidly cooling ... long term cooling burns off the carbon flashing from the hair ... so your horse hair will not be as dark or contrasting as normal ... if it stays at all.

More than likely, keep the horse hair process to decorative pieces ... it's a decorative process ... treat it as such.

#8 docweathers

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:15 PM

One approach I'm going to try is to soak feathers and horsehair in a thin colored slip or water-soluble metal salts such as ferric chloride, cobalt
sulfate, copper sulfate or ???. Hopefully when the organic material burns out from the feathers or horsehair it will deposit the colorants and a pattern reflecting the structure of the material.

Is there anything else that might be useful to try just so these things in?
Is there anything that would makethe feathers and horsehair absorb the colorants better?

Larry

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#9 weeble

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 01:09 AM

Have you thought of burnishing the feathers and horsehair into the surface at leather hard? The faint indentations are enough to catch stain in the bisque stage, then you can rub it off the main surface. You can get some very interesting effects if you use transparent glazes as well.
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#10 docweathers

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:30 PM

I contacted Frank Vickery to see how he made this cone 6 horsehair and feather glaze Vickery Cone 6 horse hair
This is what he said

"I use a vc matte glaze for the base and a copper blue matte for the top. I used little loafers from highwater. I glaze the piece and then fire it to maturation. Then let it cool all the way down and then on the next glaze cycle, stack it at the top and pull it out at 1000 degrees. If it is to thick, it will crack. If there is a slight change in room temp from a cool breeze to a fan, then it will crack. Use any organic material to leave a mark. I use the cheapo white pill feathers, long horse hair, and sometimes sugar. I think that is everything.....you can also search on you tube for The Bascom, horsehair. We have a 10 minute video.""

Larry

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#11 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 10:43 PM

Very interesting. As always rules are made to be broken in ceramics. the shows at NCECA prove that.So much amazing work is being done.

Marcia

#12 docweathers

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 11:17 PM

This guy consistently does amazing stuff. he did the oil spot MFA thesis that I posted. n=Now he's working on Some amazing Crystal glazes, which he will be publishing an article on soon. Someone ought to pick him up as faculty.

Larry

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#13 OffCenter

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 07:51 AM

This guy consistently does amazing stuff. he did the oil spot MFA thesis that I posted. n=Now he's working on Some amazing Crystal glazes, which he will be publishing an article on soon. Someone ought to pick him up as faculty.


Very interesting. Thanks for posting it.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.




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