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kilnpriestess

Chinese kiln gods and studio potters

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Benzine    609

I was thinking of making a kiln god for new Raku kiln. However, I made the ceramic buttons, look like faces, so technically, I have a couple dozen kiln gods looking in. Each one is a little different, so I essentially have pantheon of gods......Let's hope none of them is wrathful.

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I was thinking of making a kiln god for new Raku kiln. However, I made the ceramic buttons, look like faces, so technically, I have a couple dozen kiln gods looking in. Each one is a little different, so I essentially have pantheon of gods......Let's hope none of them is wrathful.

 

 

It sounds as though you have already personalized your kiln with your embellishments. With all of your attention to detail I am sure that you will have the best of luck.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

When I was doing research in Spain, several kilns had been blessed by the local priest. I assume this may serve the same purpose as Kiln Gods in other religions or cultures.

Marcia

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I didn't have a Kiln god, I have a couple of items that could have been pressed into service as kiln gods but I felt a purpose made item may have been more respectful to the philosophy of any such deities and decided I really ought to make one.

 

So, I had a glaze test fire to do yesterday and there was one item of greenware on my shelf which had been sat there for a couple months, (there had been no room for it in my last couple of bisque firings) which could serve as a kiln god, it was coloured with slips and so a single firing was deemed to be all it needed - my first suspicions were correct - the deities needed more respect - said items head exploded in kiln showering my test piece with bits - this is the first item of mine which has ever exploded.

 

I may abandon the idea of Kiln Gods, I was doing OK without them. :unsure:

 

 

 

Hmmmmmmmmmmm, exploding heads. Maybe you just need a special talisman made out of clay with some of the exploded bits wedged into it. Sometimes you have to redistribute the power and tone it down a bit.

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Yes, I've made kiln Gods when we fired at Brookdale Community College's Gas Kiln. Here I just named my electric kiln Mrs Potts. Does that count for a home kiln?

post-762-134876045631_thumb.jpg

 

 

I am sure that a loved home kiln attracts good kiln spirits just like a loving home attracts sweet stray cats.

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I have an electric kiln; the first thing I did after plugging it in was make a kiln god to watch over it. He sits on a shelf on the wall right behind the kiln. Thus far, all firings have gone well on his watch! (Though I just now realized he doesn't have eyes...) :blink:

 

 

 

Since your kiln god has heart, it seems that it does not need eyes.

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When I was doing research in Spain, several kilns had been blessed by the local priest. I assume this may serve the same purpose as Kiln Gods in other religions or cultures.

Marcia

 

 

 

Hi Marcia,

 

Maybe since kilns resemble caves and other types of places where spirits might be percieved to inhabit that the priest had to bless the space? Maybe the priest blesses all types of structures.

 

In China individual kilns are not blessed, but the deity that presides over them is rewarded if things go well.

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My electric kiln is named Dr. Evil. When I was transitioning from an 18" two-section kiln, to a 23" three-section kiln, I had both kilns in my studio for about a week. During that time they were named Dr. Evil and Mini Me.

 

I've never made kiln gods for Dr. Evil, but every time I unload a successful glaze firing, I quickly bow to the kiln and say "thank you" just to ackowledge there are forces present other than electricity.

 

Mea

 

 

Perfect. Good deeds and happy endings should always be rewarded. You know how to make your kiln spirits feel appreciated.

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Marcia Selsor    1,301

When I was doing research in Spain, several kilns had been blessed by the local priest. I assume this may serve the same purpose as Kiln Gods in other religions or cultures.

Marcia

 

 

 

Hi Marcia,

 

Maybe since kilns resemble caves and other types of places where spirits might be percieved to inhabit that the priest had to bless the space? Maybe the priest blesses all types of structures.

 

In China individual kilns are not blessed, but the deity that presides over them is rewarded if things go well.

 

In the village where I lived my friend restored the chapel of the Patron Saints of Pottery who happened to be two sisters, Justa and Rufina. They are also Patron Saints of Triana, the Barrio in Sevilla where majolica is made.

Marcia

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Benzine    609

I was thinking of making a kiln god for new Raku kiln. However, I made the ceramic buttons, look like faces, so technically, I have a couple dozen kiln gods looking in. Each one is a little different, so I essentially have pantheon of gods......Let's hope none of them is wrathful.

 

 

It sounds as though you have already personalized your kiln with your embellishments. With all of your attention to detail I am sure that you will have the best of luck.

 

 

I was hoping to have each of my Art Club member, with whom I am doing the firing, make at least one button, but there just wasn't the time. But I did have a couple make a few with me. They put a lot of time and attention into theirs. I mass produced mine, so they have less personality........Just like me.....

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When I was doing research in Spain, several kilns had been blessed by the local priest. I assume this may serve the same purpose as Kiln Gods in other religions or cultures.

Marcia

 

 

 

Hi Marcia,

 

Maybe since kilns resemble caves and other types of places where spirits might be percieved to inhabit that the priest had to bless the space? Maybe the priest blesses all types of structures.

 

In China individual kilns are not blessed, but the deity that presides over them is rewarded if things go well.

 

In the village where I lived my friend restored the chapel of the Patron Saints of Pottery who happened to be two sisters, Justa and Rufina. They are also Patron Saints of Triana, the Barrio in Sevilla where majolica is made.

Marcia

 

 

Just thinking about the Patron Saints of Pottery Chapel makes me want to go on a pilgrimage to Sevilla.

The whole restoration process and the tale of the saints sounds like a story that should be told. Marcia, you should write an article about this wonderful place.

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I have a deer skull above the firebox of the train kiln I built a couple years ago--I dont think it helps the firing any, but it sure looks cool with all that carbon on it.

 

 

Your skull sounds impressive. Even if you show your kiln to someone who might not understand exactly what it does, they should at least be impressed by how it looks as a starting point to understanding what it might do.

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I am trying to get a large donated front loading electric kiln working at the university where I teach in Brunei Darussalam. If this beast ever becomes operational I promise to make it a special kiln guardian. I have no idea of what the personality of this kiln will be like once it comes on line, but since it seems to have a lot of gauges and dials that look as though they came from a sci-fi movie from the 1950's, it might have a retro sensibility to it. I am sure that this kiln is a Sir or a Mrs. type of kiln. This kiln needs proper respect, especially since there are both Japanese and German sounding company names on some of the components. Maybe is could be a Mrs. Keramic-haussen Kiln. The control panel also has a large plastic putty and red colored bell on top that is in the shape of an air-wick solid. That is its most graceful feature. I really am open to suggestions as to what to name this kiln on which I am hanging all of my hopes of a future ceramic program on. If you have any ideas, please let me know.

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I am trying to get a large donated front loading electric kiln working at the university where I teach in Brunei Darussalam. If this beast ever becomes operational I promise to make it a special kiln guardian. I have no idea of what the personality of this kiln will be like once it comes on line, but since it seems to have a lot of gauges and dials that look as though they came from a sci-fi movie from the 1950's, it might have a retro sensibility to it. I am sure that this kiln is a Sir or a Mrs. type of kiln. This kiln needs proper respect, especially since there are both Japanese and German sounding company names on some of the components. Maybe is could be a Mrs. Keramic-haussen Kiln. The control panel also has a large plastic putty and red colored bell on top that is in the shape of an air-wick solid. That is its most graceful feature. I really am open to suggestions as to what to name this kiln on which I am hanging all of my hopes of a future ceramic program on. If you have any ideas, please let me know.

 

 

 

I have thought hard and long about the name for the kiln and I have decided to call it, "The Portal Hostess with the Magnetic Resonator." This kiln really does have a magnetic resonator because there is a press-label with raised lettering that points this feature out.

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