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kilnpriestess

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Everything posted by kilnpriestess

  1. I am not sure where my information on this image went! Anyway, the "raku ball" is really a discarded plastic ball that that has shriveled, baked, and been transformed through exposure to the minerals at Berakas Beach to resemble a raku sphere.
  2. The concepts of fine art, craft, design and visual art, performance art and new media are constantly shifting and being redefined in academia depending upon where you work and the resources that are at hand. Many institutions today seem eager to create art departments where the student has to figure out what they like and what they want to do for their final undergraduate capstone project and hope in the end that their work is accepted as a valid form of "visual art." This is the case where I am working now and where I have worked in Hong Kong and at the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford. T
  3. Rich in more than just oil,the tiny country of Brunei Darussalam hosts large tracts of pristine rain forests and is bounded on one side by beaches that give way in places to wind and water carved clay formations. These mineral stained formations with their sparse patches of pitcher-plants and other tenacious foliage are the subject of this album. I am exploring the clay landscape through photography because of its enthralling beauty. Furthermore, I am also painting landscapes from my photographs.
  4. From the album: Natural Clay Settings in Borneo

    This temporary concentration of metallic laced water collected on the beach at Berakas, Brunei Darussalam in a location that was a bit of a trek away from the popular BBQ and playground area. This is why it was left undisturbed by people. Several weeks after my serendipitous photo session I returned to this spot, however, the little mineral pool along with the several tons of sand that once supported it, had all been washed away because of flash floods caused by the winter rains. The only evidence marking the mineral pools location was the still visible form of the bleached tree, which was no

    © © 2013 Martie Geiger-Ho

  5. From the album: Natural Clay Settings in Borneo

    This photo was taken high-up on a clay and sand embankment over-looking the South China Sea. Pitcher-Plants can be seen dangling over the water carved clay wall on the left-hand side of the image. These very tough plants grow in very poor soil and they gather the nutrients they need by capturing insects in their fluid filled pitchers. The insects drown and their nutrients are absorbed by the plant. The drawback of pitcher-plants is that they support the full cycle of mosquitoes that thrive in the liquid environment of the plant's modified leaf containers. The plants benefit from the biological

    © © 2013 Martie Geiger-Ho

  6. From the album: Natural Clay Settings in Borneo

    This clay and found-object sculpture was formed courtesy of nature. In the winter months (just a figure of speech--there is no winter in Borneo) it rains more heavily than usual. This causes a lot of erosion along the beach where natural and human made debris pile up.

    © © 2013 Martie Geiger-Ho

  7. From the album: Natural Clay Settings in Borneo

    Coated with iron and other minerals this rocks gain their extraordinary colors after being being basted and baked untold times under the hot tropical sun. Many of the rocks look as though they sport a raku patina.

    © © 2013 Martie Geiger-Ho

  8. From the album: Natural Clay Settings in Borneo

    Rich in visual elements, the eroded clay landscape of Berakas Beach is home to pitcher-plants, geckos, and monitor lizards.

    © © 2013 Martie Geiger-Ho

  9. From the album: Natural Clay Settings in Borneo

    Rich in more than just oil,the tiny country of Brunei Darussalam hosts large tracts of pristine rain forests and is bounded on one side by beaches that give way in places to wind and water carved clay formations. These mineral stained formations with their sparse patches of pitcher-plants and other tenacious foliage are the subject of this album. I am exploring the clay landscape through photography because of its enthralling beauty. Furthermore, I am also painting landscapes from my photographs.

    © © 2013 Martie Geiger-Ho

  10. Your writing is very informative and so professional. I greatly enjoy your ceramic art as well.

  11. Shards and more shards thrown-up by the Hong Kong’s ocean currents, that’s what I put under my Christmas tree this year. I was lucky to visit Hong Kong during Christmas this year (my husband and I often go there during the holiday season to visit his family) and I was able to get a ferry to one of my most treasured beaches for collecting shards from the South China Sea. This year I found a couple of shards with the whole oval design of my favorite blue and white motif—a stylized folk-art linear crane (bird) with the what appears to be the body and tail of a fish. In addition to locating
  12. Until now my clay addiction has not really driven me to record extremes in behavior. However, now that I have been without fresh commercial clay for over a full semester in Brunei Darussalam I find myself doing things to get an "earth" fix that few people seem willing to subject themselves to-I have been trekking about in the blistering sun on the island of Borneo just to be close to a natural clay site that happens to exist down the road from where I work. I actually taught a university ceramics class last semester without clay or a working kiln. Obviously the students got credit for learning
  13. Due to my need to teach courses in various media, I find myself creating different bodies of work for each kind of material that I am using. I am not only inspired by the material itself, but of course I am also interested in seeing if there is a common thread or concept behind these various bodies of work. I would love to always work in clay, but when I find that I am without a studio, or that I have to take up another material, I can usually create work that I feel passsionate about given a little time.
  14. I have thought hard and long about the name for the kiln and I have decided to call it, "The Portal Hostess with the Magnetic Resonator." This kiln really does have a magnetic resonator because there is a press-label with raised lettering that points this feature out.
  15. I am trying to get a large donated front loading electric kiln working at the university where I teach in Brunei Darussalam. If this beast ever becomes operational I promise to make it a special kiln guardian. I have no idea of what the personality of this kiln will be like once it comes on line, but since it seems to have a lot of gauges and dials that look as though they came from a sci-fi movie from the 1950's, it might have a retro sensibility to it. I am sure that this kiln is a Sir or a Mrs. type of kiln. This kiln needs proper respect, especially since there are both Japanese and German
  16. Your skull sounds impressive. Even if you show your kiln to someone who might not understand exactly what it does, they should at least be impressed by how it looks as a starting point to understanding what it might do.
  17. Hi Marcia, Maybe since kilns resemble caves and other types of places where spirits might be percieved to inhabit that the priest had to bless the space? Maybe the priest blesses all types of structures. In China individual kilns are not blessed, but the deity that presides over them is rewarded if things go well. In the village where I lived my friend restored the chapel of the Patron Saints of Pottery who happened to be two sisters, Justa and Rufina. They are also Patron Saints of Triana, the Barrio in Sevilla where majolica is made. Marcia Just thinking about the Patro
  18. Perfect. Good deeds and happy endings should always be rewarded. You know how to make your kiln spirits feel appreciated.
  19. And I bet that you have a good relationship with her because you respect her awsome powers.
  20. Hi Marcia, Maybe since kilns resemble caves and other types of places where spirits might be percieved to inhabit that the priest had to bless the space? Maybe the priest blesses all types of structures. In China individual kilns are not blessed, but the deity that presides over them is rewarded if things go well.
  21. Since your kiln god has heart, it seems that it does not need eyes.
  22. I am sure that a loved home kiln attracts good kiln spirits just like a loving home attracts sweet stray cats.
  23. Hmmmmmmmmmmm, exploding heads. Maybe you just need a special talisman made out of clay with some of the exploded bits wedged into it. Sometimes you have to redistribute the power and tone it down a bit.
  24. It sounds as though you have already personalized your kiln with your embellishments. With all of your attention to detail I am sure that you will have the best of luck.
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