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Cone 5/6 celedon glaze

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I don't have the celedon recipe in hand but you can use a clear, add 0.5% of copper carbonate and 0.05-0.01% of black mason stain 6600.

The black give the blusih tinge. It is a minute amount. To weigh this small of a quantity measue out .1% on your scale, then divide it in and, half again, half again etc.

I matched an electric fired ^6 celedon to a ^10 reduction using this color combination. Always test first.

 

Marcia

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I don't have the celedon recipe in hand but you can use a clear, add 0.5% of copper carbonate and 0.05-0.01% of black mason stain 6600.

The black give the blusih tinge. It is a minute amount. To weigh this small of a quantity measue out .1% on your scale, then divide it in and, half again, half again etc.

I matched an electric fired ^6 celedon to a ^10 reduction using this color combination. Always test first.

 

Marcia

 

 

 

I have 2 good ^6 celadons, but also have house guests, recepies are out in the studio. I will put them up later.

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Here is a link to an excerpt from a Ceramics Monthly article by John Britt. It contains a Pete Pinnell celadon adjusted for cone 6:

 

http://ceramicartsda...cone-6-potters/

 

Sherman

 

 

That's the one I was going to put up, I use it with good results.

 

 

Pete's ^6 celedon is for reduction. The request was for oxidation via electric kiln. The iron in Pete's recipe will turn yellowish. I use a miniscule amount of black stain to get the bluish tinge in oxidation.

 

 

Marcia

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I don't have the celedon recipe in hand but you can use a clear, add 0.5% of copper carbonate and 0.05-0.01% of black mason stain 6600.

The black give the blusih tinge. It is a minute amount. To weigh this small of a quantity measue out .1% on your scale, then divide it in and, half again, half again etc.

I matched an electric fired ^6 celedon to a ^10 reduction using this color combination. Always test first.

 

Marcia

 

 

I've never heard of adding the black stain. Thanks for the idea.

 

Jim

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to get a minuscule amount of stain for tests on a balance beam scale, try weighing 0.1 gram, put is on a slick surface and divide it in half, in half again until you get down to a close estimate of the amount you are after.

The black stain (one with cobalt) will give the celedon a tinge of blue. I matched the color to a cone 10 reduction celedon using this.

 

Marcia

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to get a minuscule amount of stain for tests on a balance beam scale, try weighing 0.1 gram, put is on a slick surface and divide it in half, in half again until you get down to a close estimate of the amount you are after.

The black stain (one with cobalt) will give the celedon a tinge of blue. I matched the color to a cone 10 reduction celedon using this.

 

Marcia

 

 

Good idea. Counting atoms takes forever.... I noticed that that stain contains cobalt, iron, etc. It's an ingenious way to add a miniscule amount of cobalt to a glaze.

 

Jim

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A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.

 

 

The subject of this thread was cone 6 (fake, if you like) celadons. Small amounts of copper are usually used to get a celadon color in oxidation. Cobalt gives a very un-celadonish color so I was impressed with Marcia's way of introducing such a tiny amount of cobalt.

 

Jim

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A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.

 

 

The subject of this thread was cone 6 (fake, if you like) celadons. Small amounts of copper are usually used to get a celadon color in oxidation. Cobalt gives a very un-celadonish color so I was impressed with Marcia's way of introducing such a tiny amount of cobalt.

 

Jim

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A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.

 

 

Small amounts of copper are usually used to get a celadon color in oxidation.

 

 

 

Depends on the base formula of the glaze, and what type of celadon you're after. Celadon greens cover a wide range from bright jade to gray. I personally like the brighter colors, and have had better luck with a stain rather than copper. Just depends on what you're after.

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My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Bair told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.

The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of my work of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right)using Burnt Umber as a colorant and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

post-1954-135888029975_thumb.jpg

post-1954-135888043364_thumb.jpg

post-1954-135888029975_thumb.jpg

post-1954-135888043364_thumb.jpg

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My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.

The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

 

 

Both of those are very nice celadons. Is the cone 6 celadon copper and Mason black?

 

Jim

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My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.

The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

 

 

Both of those are very nice celadons. Is the cone 6 celadon copper and Mason black?

 

Jim

 

 

Yes. I have combined it with Mizumo Clear and another clear I used for reduction copper red. So the recipe was rewritten for 2 parts one of the glazes and 3 parts another. I can post it in my when I go look for the recipe.

Marcia

 

 

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Selsor Faux Celedon ^6 Oxidation

 

Whiting 18.5

Neph Syen 25.8

EPK 18.8

Silica 31.1

Gerstley B 4.6

98.8

Copper carb 0.3

Mason #6600 Black 0.02

 

Gayle's Celedon from Clayart ^6 Oxidation

 

F-4 or Minspar 50

Wollastonite 20

Kaolin 10

Silica 10

Gerstley Bor. 10

100

Copper carb 0.3

Mason 6600 Black 0.05

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My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.

The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

 

BTW the one on the right used burnt umber as the colorant.

 

 

 

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My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.

The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

BTW the one on the right used burnt umber as the colorant.

 

 

 

 

Thank you for the formulas Marcia. I know of HS teacher that is looking for a celedon. I will send these to her. Your posts are always interesting and informative.

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In cone 6 ... very low colorant levels and a clear glaze are the key to a fake celedon ... my studio celedon is a dolomite matte glaze with .75% cobalt carb and .5% nickle as the colorants ... That way I can achieve a soft bluish teal with a buttery smooth surface. Really it depends on you're will and wants on this ... the three colorants you should consider is cobalt, copper and nickle ... seen yellowish green celedons but nah ... stick to a blue green of your own preference.

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For faux cone 6 celedons very low levels of Mason stains (like Robin's Egg Blue) work well if you're looking for an icy blue. Also, if in the mood for testing your favorite fake celedon, try 2% or so tin oxide and/or bone ash. Just a little tin makes most celedon's more interesting.

 

Jim

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