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Cone 5/6 celedon glaze


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#1 kelleyisfj

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 01:09 AM

I'm looking for a blue celedon cone 5/6 glaze I can use in an electric kiln.

#2 crkceramics

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Posted 19 August 2012 - 06:17 PM

I don't have a recipe but if you're willing to use a commercial glaze, Coyote has a nice blue celadon.

#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 06:53 AM

I don't have the celedon recipe in hand but you can use a clear, add 0.5% of copper carbonate and 0.05-0.01% of black mason stain 6600.
The black give the blusih tinge. It is a minute amount. To weigh this small of a quantity measue out .1% on your scale, then divide it in and, half again, half again etc.
I matched an electric fired ^6 celedon to a ^10 reduction using this color combination. Always test first.

Marcia

#4 clay lover

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 08:25 AM

I don't have the celedon recipe in hand but you can use a clear, add 0.5% of copper carbonate and 0.05-0.01% of black mason stain 6600.
The black give the blusih tinge. It is a minute amount. To weigh this small of a quantity measue out .1% on your scale, then divide it in and, half again, half again etc.
I matched an electric fired ^6 celedon to a ^10 reduction using this color combination. Always test first.

Marcia



I have 2 good ^6 celadons, but also have house guests, recepies are out in the studio. I will put them up later.

#5 Sherman

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 09:44 AM

Here is a link to an excerpt from a Ceramics Monthly article by John Britt. It contains a Pete Pinnell celadon adjusted for cone 6:

http://ceramicartsda...cone-6-potters/

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#6 clay lover

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 06:50 AM

Here is a link to an excerpt from a Ceramics Monthly article by John Britt. It contains a Pete Pinnell celadon adjusted for cone 6:

http://ceramicartsda...cone-6-potters/

Sherman


That's the one I was going to put up, I use it with good results.

#7 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 07:22 AM


Here is a link to an excerpt from a Ceramics Monthly article by John Britt. It contains a Pete Pinnell celadon adjusted for cone 6:

http://ceramicartsda...cone-6-potters/

Sherman


That's the one I was going to put up, I use it with good results.


Pete's ^6 celedon is for reduction. The request was for oxidation via electric kiln. The iron in Pete's recipe will turn yellowish. I use a miniscule amount of black stain to get the bluish tinge in oxidation.


Marcia

#8 OffCenter

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 02:39 PM

I don't have the celedon recipe in hand but you can use a clear, add 0.5% of copper carbonate and 0.05-0.01% of black mason stain 6600.
The black give the blusih tinge. It is a minute amount. To weigh this small of a quantity measue out .1% on your scale, then divide it in and, half again, half again etc.
I matched an electric fired ^6 celedon to a ^10 reduction using this color combination. Always test first.

Marcia


I've never heard of adding the black stain. Thanks for the idea.

Jim
E pur si muove.

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#9 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 08:31 AM

to get a minuscule amount of stain for tests on a balance beam scale, try weighing 0.1 gram, put is on a slick surface and divide it in half, in half again until you get down to a close estimate of the amount you are after.
The black stain (one with cobalt) will give the celedon a tinge of blue. I matched the color to a cone 10 reduction celedon using this.

Marcia

#10 OffCenter

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 10:10 AM

to get a minuscule amount of stain for tests on a balance beam scale, try weighing 0.1 gram, put is on a slick surface and divide it in half, in half again until you get down to a close estimate of the amount you are after.
The black stain (one with cobalt) will give the celedon a tinge of blue. I matched the color to a cone 10 reduction celedon using this.

Marcia


Good idea. Counting atoms takes forever.... I noticed that that stain contains cobalt, iron, etc. It's an ingenious way to add a miniscule amount of cobalt to a glaze.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#11 neilestrick

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:04 AM

A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.
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#12 OffCenter

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:19 AM

A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.


The subject of this thread was cone 6 (fake, if you like) celadons. Small amounts of copper are usually used to get a celadon color in oxidation. Cobalt gives a very un-celadonish color so I was impressed with Marcia's way of introducing such a tiny amount of cobalt.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#13 OffCenter

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 10:19 AM

A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.


The subject of this thread was cone 6 (fake, if you like) celadons. Small amounts of copper are usually used to get a celadon color in oxidation. Cobalt gives a very un-celadonish color so I was impressed with Marcia's way of introducing such a tiny amount of cobalt.

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#14 neilestrick

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 12:20 PM


A true celadon uses iron oxide for it's colorant, and is fired in reduction. In a cone 6 electric firing you'll have to use a stain. You just need to find a clear glaze with the surface qualities you like, then add the stain of your choice.


Small amounts of copper are usually used to get a celadon color in oxidation.


Depends on the base formula of the glaze, and what type of celadon you're after. Celadon greens cover a wide range from bright jade to gray. I personally like the brighter colors, and have had better luck with a stain rather than copper. Just depends on what you're after.
Neil Estrick
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www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#15 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 01:47 PM

My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Bair told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.
The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of my work of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right)using Burnt Umber as a colorant and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

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#16 OffCenter

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 03:30 PM

My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.
The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)


Both of those are very nice celadons. Is the cone 6 celadon copper and Mason black?

Jim
E pur si muove.

"But it does move," said Galileo under his breath.

#17 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:06 PM


My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.
The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)


Both of those are very nice celadons. Is the cone 6 celadon copper and Mason black?

Jim


Yes. I have combined it with Mizumo Clear and another clear I used for reduction copper red. So the recipe was rewritten for 2 parts one of the glazes and 3 parts another. I can post it in my when I go look for the recipe.
Marcia



#18 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:15 PM

Selsor Faux Celedon ^6 Oxidation

Whiting 18.5
Neph Syen 25.8
EPK 18.8
Silica 31.1
Gerstley B 4.6
98.8
Copper carb 0.3
Mason #6600 Black 0.02

Gayle's Celedon from Clayart ^6 Oxidation

F-4 or Minspar 50
Wollastonite 20
Kaolin 10
Silica 10
Gerstley Bor. 10
100
Copper carb 0.3
Mason 6600 Black 0.05

#19 OffCenter

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 04:56 PM

Thanks, Marcia!

Jim
E pur si muove.

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#20 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:53 PM

My favorite shade of celedon is a pale green with a tint of blue. My friend Gayle Baird told me about the addition of Black stain to tone down the copper in Ox.
The original question was for a cone 6 celedon in Oxidation. I think most of us are aware that the original Chinese celedon is fired in reduction in wood kilns. Here are 2 examples of a celedon fired to ^10 reduction (Right) and a faux Oxidation celedon fired at ^6.(Left)

BTW the one on the right used burnt umber as the colorant.







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