Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

surform


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Juli Long

Juli Long

    La Paloma Texas Pottery

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 124 posts
  • Locationtexas

Posted 03 May 2012 - 01:59 PM

I've heard several pottery swear by a surform, some saying they couldn't do without it.
I have attempted several times to get a good grasp of using one, but it sure is not my favorite tool.
What is the proper dryness stage to use it, and how do you go about smoothing the surface out after you use
it, if you decide you want it smooth?
I am sure....I am doing something not quite right.
Any tips?
I thank all who offer help and suggestions.
juli

La Paloma Texas Pottery, Juli Long


#2 Idaho Potter

Idaho Potter

    Learning all the time

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 403 posts
  • LocationBoise, Idaho

Posted 03 May 2012 - 02:18 PM

Juli, I use my small hand-held ones when the clay is leather hard ( like a good aged cheddar) and when close to what I want, ease up on the pressure so the grooves aren't as deep, then use a metal rib to finish the surface. If there are small imperfections, I brush on some terra sig and work that in. I'm sure there are other ways, but this is mine.

#3 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,353 posts
  • LocationBrownsville, Texas

Posted 03 May 2012 - 02:47 PM

I use a surform at the leather hard stage. I also use bits of hacksaw blades to remove bumps.
I use a slip ti fill and smooth with a rib.
Marcia

Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,
Montana State University-Billings

Marcia Selsor Studio in Brownsville, Texas.

http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com


#4 Juli Long

Juli Long

    La Paloma Texas Pottery

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 124 posts
  • Locationtexas

Posted 03 May 2012 - 03:47 PM

Marcia, and Idaho Potter,
Thanks for the help. From reading your responses, I think I am being a little too aggressive, and not lighting up at the end. I, too, work it at the leather hard stage, but thought it might
need to be a bit dryer to avoid the deep grooves, but I now think not. I will go back and lightly fine tune, and then use a rib to smooth and maybe a slip to fill.
juli

La Paloma Texas Pottery, Juli Long


#5 neilestrick

neilestrick

    Neil Estrick

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,065 posts
  • LocationGrayslake, IL

Posted 03 May 2012 - 03:50 PM

They cut very aggressively when new. Be gentle. I like my old, dull ones best.

Neil Estrick
Kiln Repair Tech
L&L Kilns Distributor
Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

[email protected]


#6 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,353 posts
  • LocationBrownsville, Texas

Posted 04 May 2012 - 07:11 AM

this is how I refine large tarpaper formed vessels.
Marcia

Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,
Montana State University-Billings

Marcia Selsor Studio in Brownsville, Texas.

http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com


#7 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,353 posts
  • LocationBrownsville, Texas

Posted 04 May 2012 - 07:13 AM

didn't attach on first attempt. sorry. This is how I refine the edges of large tarpaper foams.

Marcia

Attached Files


Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,
Montana State University-Billings

Marcia Selsor Studio in Brownsville, Texas.

http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com


#8 Pres

Pres

    Retired Art Teacher

  • Moderators
  • 2,788 posts
  • LocationCentral, PA

Posted 04 May 2012 - 08:01 AM

didn't attach on first attempt. sorry. This is how I refine the edges of large tarpaper foams.

Marcia


Earlier you mentioned the use of hack saw blades. I have always used hack saw blades to sharpen up edges, and make certain joins have continuity. I used to also have access to used band saw blades. Different blades would have close or far distanced teeth that would allow fast removal of material and then use finer blades to clean up, then the flat edge to finish. These days I rely on packages of 50 hacksaw blades to get the work done. Some I will heat up to bend into hoop tools and other trimmers.
Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . . http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/

#9 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,950 posts
  • LocationRaleigh, NC

Posted 04 May 2012 - 10:53 AM

Pres ... Could you post images of those tools made from the blades?

Chris Campbell

Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

 

TRY ... FAIL ... LEARN ... REPEAT

" ... If a sufficient number of people are different, no one has to be normal"
Fredrick Bachman


#10 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, MSU-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 5,353 posts
  • LocationBrownsville, Texas

Posted 04 May 2012 - 03:00 PM

Pres,
I use the hacksaw on edges too. I worked for a sculptor while I was in Grad school as the final form finisher for plaster models before they went to the foundry.
I used the surform and hacksaw blades back then as well.
Marcia

Marcia Selsor, Professor Emerita,
Montana State University-Billings

Marcia Selsor Studio in Brownsville, Texas.

http://www.marciaselsorstudio.com


#11 flowerdry

flowerdry

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 377 posts
  • LocationVirginia

Posted 04 May 2012 - 08:24 PM

I love the different textures I can get with the surform and will sometimes intentionally not smooth the surface.

Doris Hackworth

"Promoting the joy of handmade pottery"





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users