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#1 Peter

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 06:46 PM

Hi Everyone,

I'm thinking about getting a pug mill to reclaim my discarded clay trimmings and shavings along with bone dry pieces at times.
I've noticed that finding information and reviews from potters is very scarce. Company sales pitches are readily available and of course they all make the best there is.....(sigh). I'd prefer a "deairing" version but when it comes to Steel, Aluminum, Stainless, Single Auger, Dual Auger,.......you get my point....
Can anyone offer some reviews on how they like/dislike their pugger..
I'm not sure what the policies are on this forum regarding negative opinions on equipment. An email would be nice.
The one I'm looking at is the Bailey A-400 Table Combo.
Information on ease of use and cleaning requirements would be appreciated.
Thanks for helping clear info jungle,

Peter

#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 07:59 PM

I have worked with old stainless steel Walker Pugmils, an old not stainless Peter Pugger, a Shimpo in a University setting and my own Bailey Deairing pug mill with a cast aluminum casing..
I love my Bailey because I can take it apart easily, clean it out and change clay bodies without worry. The Walker had a lot of nuts and bolts to take apart. The Peter Pugger was rusted pretty bad when I got it. So it was not ever going to pug porcelain.


Marcia

#3 Peter

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 08:16 PM

I have worked with old stainless steel Walker Pugmils, an old not stainless Peter Pugger, a Shimpo in a University setting and my own Bailey Deairing pug mill with a cast aluminum casing..
I love my Bailey because I can take it apart easily, clean it out and change clay bodies without worry. The Walker had a lot of nuts and bolts to take apart. The Peter Pugger was rusted pretty bad when I got it. So it was not ever going to pug porcelain.


Marcia


Thanks Marcia,

Would you recommend the "Stainless" model? I do dabble with porcelain but not very much although one never knows what the future may bring.

#4 Pres

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 08:48 PM

I have worked with old stainless steel Walker Pugmils, an old not stainless Peter Pugger, a Shimpo in a University setting and my own Bailey Deairing pug mill with a cast aluminum casing..
I love my Bailey because I can take it apart easily, clean it out and change clay bodies without worry. The Walker had a lot of nuts and bolts to take apart. The Peter Pugger was rusted pretty bad when I got it. So it was not ever going to pug porcelain.


Marcia


The walker was nice to work with in some ways. As you said stainless steel, HUGE opening, single auger, powerful! It had some downsides though-often the safety kick bar and the guard lift disconnect would come loose and not get fixed so people did get hurt. I remember the one in college where both of these safeties were off of the machine. Someone lost part of finger while I was there-big stink. Mine at school always had the safeties installed, and the oil changed and greasing frequently. It lasted heavy use for nearly 30 years, and was still going strong when I left. I taught students how to use it properly and usually had no problems. One other class used it and had a problem when someone used one of my 24 inch rolling pins in it! Dang pug mill ate off the handle and part of the shaft before they got it yanked out. I had a good talk with the teacher, and they cleaned down the whole machine to remove the wood.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#5 Mark C.

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 10:56 PM

I sent you an e-mail with my 2 cents.
mark
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#6 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 06:01 AM


I have worked with old stainless steel Walker Pugmils, an old not stainless Peter Pugger, a Shimpo in a University setting and my own Bailey Deairing pug mill with a cast aluminum casing..
I love my Bailey because I can take it apart easily, clean it out and change clay bodies without worry. The Walker had a lot of nuts and bolts to take apart. The Peter Pugger was rusted pretty bad when I got it. So it was not ever going to pug porcelain.


Marcia


Thanks Marcia,

Would you recommend the "Stainless" model? I do dabble with porcelain but not very much although one never knows what the future may bring.

I am fine with my aluminum model. Stainless is probably excellent but an added cost. I clean it after each use.





#7 yedrow

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 05:02 PM

I don't have a lot of experience with different pug mills, but I do have a lot with one. I've used an old Walker, a brand new Bailey, a Blue Bird, and mostly the Venco. The downside of the Venco is the cost of parts. To me that is about it. The Blue Bird and the Bailey are poorly engineered in ways that increase the amount of work needed to use them (poorly designed hoppers mainly). The Walker is a death trap, lol. The Venco pugmill that I used was a production tool for people who throw lots of clay. It was safe and efficient. For the hobbiest I suspect the Blue Bird and the Bailey would work fine, especially for the price. But if you are throwing fifty to a hundred and fifty pounds of clay a day you really want a good tool. The right tool for the job.

#8 neilestrick

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 06:59 PM

Peter Pugger, or that type, are awesome because they mix as well as pug. You can put in slop and dry trimmings to get just the right mixture, then de-air it and pug it out. Regular pug mills are not good mixers.

Before you buy anything, take a look at how much the pug mill will cost you and compare it to the cost of the trimmings that you would otherwise be throwing out. Also take a look at the amount of time you will spend pugging versus the amount of pots you can make during that time. It may take many, many years for a pug mill to pay off. Half an hour of my time to save $100 worth of clay? Not worth it. I would lose money on that deal.
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#9 Mark C.

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Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:18 PM

I think the the same as Neilstrick on this-Peter puggers are awesome but what is my time worth.
Mark
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www.liscomhillpottery.com

#10 Peter

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 01:47 AM

Thanks to Everyone for their advice and guidance regarding Pugmills.
I realize they all have their plusses and minuses. I'm leaning towards the Peter Pugger based on comments here and emails I've received along with added research I was able to do. Their Mixer/Pugmill looks like it'll
do what' I'm looking for in reclaiming clay trimmings, slop and unusable bone dry pieces...

Every year we see manufactures coming out with new products, upgrading past models and sometimes just adding a bell and whistle to continue to sell something inferior. I admit I felt a little
hesitant to make this enquiry here based on some comments, made by a few in the past, who felt that members sometimes rehash topics covered previously. Last years questions or concerns about studio equipment may be different or outdated based on new models and a forum like this is one of the few venues where actual users can help steer someone in the right direction.
I applaud the members who took time to reply with pertinent information on equipment available today and the considerations that should be taken into account in making a purchase of an addition to a studio.

Again, Thank You.....

#11 Idaho Potter

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 06:16 PM

I will add my vote to the Peter Pugger. When my back and shoulder curtailed my ability to properly wedge clay, I knew if I wanted to continue to be a potter a deairing Mixer/Pugger would be my next big expenditure. Because I am not a production potter, I just wish Peter Pugger had made their VPM-9 at the time I was buying. I got the smallest one they produced--VPM-20--but it's really more than I need. Sometimes "cost" doesn't mean recovering scrap clay, sometimes it means being able to continue doing what you love. Measured that way, a Mixer/Puggr is money well-spent. At least that's what my old achey body says.

#12 Pres

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Posted 18 April 2012 - 06:25 PM

I will add my vote to the Peter Pugger. When my back and shoulder curtailed my ability to properly wedge clay, I knew if I wanted to continue to be a potter a deairing Mixer/Pugger would be my next big expenditure. Because I am not a production potter, I just wish Peter Pugger had made their VPM-9 at the time I was buying. I got the smallest one they produced--VPM-20--but it's really more than I need. Sometimes "cost" doesn't mean recovering scrap clay, sometimes it means being able to continue doing what you love. Measured that way, a Mixer/Puggr is money well-spent. At least that's what my old achey body says.


The other thing I wonder about all of the clay trimmings-where do you put it if you don't recycle it? Myself I don't have a pug mill, and throw the scraps into a bag, spray in some water, wrap tight let sit. Block up the clay when it is workable and bread slice it into a bag of fresh clay and wedge. The exercise is good for me, the way I wedge(spiral) is OK on my wrists, and by mixing this way I get the consistency I want to throw with. I would love to have a pug mill, but as I only go through a ton every other year-no big deal. Time-Hell I'm retired!:P

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#13 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 06:17 AM

I slake my trimmings and recycle them. I am in the habit of making paper clay with the slurry, sometimes I make a decorating slip, or I just dry it out on plaster to a workable consistency.
I also have a Soldner mixer for mixing my clay bodies.

Marcia




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