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I would also suggest starting solid and carving away. If you want an angular form like that use a cut off wire or straight edged trimming tool to slice away. You can go at the block of clay with pretty much anything but I think it will be easier if you have some variation of the form in mind before you start cutting. Also! Look at Tim Rowan's work

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Hard to say exactly how, he probably uses a combination of techniques depending on the piece.  If it were me and I was making only one or two carving would work (taking away), if I were making more than a couple, or if they were large l would use clay slabs in a form assembled on/in a form and do alterations. Friend of mine when I was working out of a studio in Berkley, Ca. Was building giant planters for commercial buildings these were angular pieces 3’x4’x3’ he would pull them from the wood supports and beat them with metal chains and other stuff to give them texture. I might also try using a multi part plaster press/cast mold and then hand alterations if I wanted to do large production.

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It's great that now I understand the used techniques to build this type of pot, I am very curious what will come out from my first cube of clay carving.  It seems very difficult (like everything which is great) and for sure surprises and challenges will appear during the work. 

Using the slab building - addition method works too, I have built a similar object but it's still far away from what I have tried to achieve. However, subtraction seems to be the way to go, or a combination of several techniques. 

Cutting all the paper pieces and establishing the construction sequence  is very important, yet difficult for this kind of pot, especially when starting from a couple of pictures, and not having the pot in front of you. There are different shapes that needs to be combined at different angles, pieces that differ in thickness and totally irregular foots.  Another thing is that the pot base is straight and everything around it is totally different (thickness, shapes, angles and so on).

Any way, it's a well received challenge and something that I will pursue.

Many thanks all for your help.

 

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5 hours ago, VladCruceanu said:

It's great that now I understand the used techniques to build this type of pot, I am very curious what will come out from my first cube of clay carving.  It seems very difficult (like everything which is great) and for sure surprises and challenges will appear during the work. 

Using the slab building - addition method works too, I have built a similar object but it's still far away from what I have tried to achieve. However, subtraction seems to be the way to go, or a combination of several techniques. 

Cutting all the paper pieces and establishing the construction sequence  is very important, yet difficult for this kind of pot, especially when starting from a couple of pictures, and not having the pot in front of you. There are different shapes that needs to be combined at different angles, pieces that differ in thickness and totally irregular foots.  Another thing is that the pot base is straight and everything around it is totally different (thickness, shapes, angles and so on).

Any way, it's a well received challenge and something that I will pursue.

Many thanks all for your help.

 

Don't forget to share the photo if you can!

When I tried kurinuki, I used really groggy clay.  That way it holds its shape through dramatic cuts rather than collapsing.

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The clay I am ordering is coming as 10 kg packages. To make a cube of clay, let's say 40 cm sides, so I can start carving it, I should combine several 10 kg packages. Probably 3 package for this dimension.

If I will put one package on another and press it, will it combine? Having a very groggy clay I think that I won't be able to push it so hard  and it won't get one whole piece of clay.

A smaller cube is pretty easy to make, but how about a large one for a big pot?

Any ideas?

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If you want to start with a solid cube with 40 cm sides, you'd need over 100 kg of clay (assuming the density of clay you're using is similar to that given here). I suggest starting with a shape that's more like a box with thick walls. With 30 kg of clay, you can make a cubical box with 40 cm sides and walls 8 - 9 cm thick. This will also make it easier to join the separate pieces of clay together.

Having groggy clay helps, but I think you'll need to be very careful about how you dry the pot to stop it cracking.

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