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Stephen

Kiln cross country moving preparations

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We are moving a skutt 1027 and a 9cf Seattle Pottery oval from Washington State to Texas next month (about 3000 miles). We are loading them into a u haul trailer and driving them ourselves behind a pickup truck. I bought a third one (another 1027) last November and picked it up in Tacoma and they loaded it as it came from the factory on a pallet into my u-haul truck and I drove it to Texas and it made it just fine. It was on a molded soft floor of some sort (don't remember the material) and the ring sections were snapped together. The side control panel with the electronic controller was however not attached and lid was not fully attached either.

Our plan was to just put down a heavy base of blankets and then reassemble the kiln sections in the trailer (pretty much reassemble) , put some blankets on top, cover with plywoord and then strap it in good and make sure they can't move too much. Will not be putting anything on top of either.

Is this a good plan?

Edited by Stephen

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Stephen, this video shows how we crate top-loading kilns at Paragon. I recommend a skid under the kiln, with sheets of cardboard between the kiln and the skid. You could use ratchet straps instead of the steel banding shown in the video.

Good luck with your move.

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA
ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

 

 

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Go to the home center and get a big sheet of 1-2" insulating foam board, the pink/blue/green stuff that's used on walls. Put a layer or two on the skid, then set the wall rings on that. Put down another layer of foam on top of the rings, and set the lid on that. Then another layer of foam board and then the floor. If your lid has a lifter setup, you may need to use some foam to level out the lid before putting the floor on there. Strap it into place in the trailer so it can't move around. Be careful with the straps so you don't crush the bricks.

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Just some thoughts.  Sams club here sells foam floor pads with puzzle like edges that fit together so you can stand on a padded floor, you might see if something like that is available at walmart or costco or wherever.  You could also get some foam pool noodles and kind of arrange them so they are inside the kiln horizontally against the brick, just to try to dampen any vibrations.  Probably not needed at all, but if you are concerned it might be way of keeping stuff from getting stressed.

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I suggest putting it the truck bed as that suspension is 1000% better than any trailer (I own 4 trailers)

If you must do that do what everyones above has said-the u-hual truck has better suspension than any trailer as well. trailers bounce-that all do so kilns do not like bouncing.

How about taking the sections apart and pack them separately for bouncing .

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On 3/8/2018 at 4:51 PM, Mark C. said:

I suggest putting it the truck bed as that suspension is 1000% better than any trailer (I own 4 trailers)

If you must do that do what everyones above has said-the u-hual truck has better suspension than any trailer as well. trailers bounce-that all do so kilns do not like bouncing.

How about taking the sections apart and pack them separately for bouncing .

And if you do have to use a trailer, put the kiln in front of the axle as far as you can for the same reason Mark stated.  The truck suspension will dampen some of the trailer bounce close to the tongue.  Anything behind the axle is subject to much more bounce.  (we all used to fight for the back of the school buss so we could get tossed as the buss went over the bumps) 

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When I was at Olympic Kilns in Flowery Branch, GA, having just finished ordering a new kiln (MAS2327HE), the sales representative talked me into using my own truck to transport the kiln home, saying it will be much safer in my truck versus sending it using the contracted tractor trailer truck. I have a cap on my GMC Sierra truck and the rep came out and measured it to make sure it would work. When I returned to pick up the kiln, they had me back up to the ramp of the loading dock, at just the right height. They then slid the kiln off of a pallet into the back of my truck using several thick sheets of cardboard. The kiln was well wrapped in plastic wrap (with foam sheet between lid and kiln body).  They discouraged the use of any straps. Of course, I only had to drive a little more than an hour to get it home. Traveled like a dream. Unwrapped it, did all the taking apart, unstacking, carrying to workshop section by section and re-stacking, putting it all back together, as per instructions and all was well. It was a cool experience.

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Just an update, last week moved the two kilns (7cf Skutt 1027, 9cf SPS) 2300 miles in a 16' Penski truck and ended up with one top brick cracked one the older SPS one and that brick had a hairline crack before and when we laid the lid on top before strapping we may have applied pressure to that crack.

I ended up with putting a pallet down and buying a 4x8 sheet of 4" insulation ($32) cutting that in half and then putting half down, built kiln in place directly on it and then the other half on top.

Used two straps through pallet and over foam and tightened snug with those click tighten straps, but tried not to put too much pressure. I did not tie the pallets to the sides of the truck but I did have the rest of the studio equipment and boxes keeping the pallets from moving and ropes across in front to keep anything from spilling into the kiln area. my reasoning to not tying off the pallets was to let the whole thing move as one and not create any resistance that would jar the kiln in sudden stops, turns or pot holes.

Seemed to have worked well. I really thought such a long trip would result in some damage. $32 a kiln for the 4" foam insulation was certainly worth it. 

Thanks everyone for all the advice!  

   

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