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#21 clay lover

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 08:51 AM

Thanks, Lynny, sounds like we have been in the same place and tried some of the same things.


When you changed from set topic groups of lessons to open studio, did you keep the same # of students? I could not do that because one of my workstations for hand building is my wedging table and another is a rolling table that I put over my wheel for some to work on. The most I could have at one time is 3 and would have to charge less that the workshop sessions.

One thought, I have been supplying ALL tools, materials and rolling big slabs of clay to dry some the night before classes. I would not do that, they would be learning to roll their own clay, managing drying, covering, in other words, learning all that I have been doing for them. So I would be doing less and they would be learning just as much.

I have been advised to sell them clay at double the cost to me and let that cover firing fees and glaze costs, rather than getting involved with a lot of record keeping and measurement. Do you guys think that would cover it?
I have also thought about giving them X amount of space in the kiln and if they go over that to add a fee for larger work.

I want to try this open approach for say a month to see how we all feel about it. At the end of the month, what would I do with the unfinished work they would have, since everybody would be going in a different direction at a different pace? The workshop approach took care of that since they were all moving along together.

#22 teardrop

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 09:53 AM

No apology needed, herb. Just don't whine incessantly when yer favorite tool comes up missin that you left out irresponsibly and we will be cool.

As far as studio rules in the studio I am in.... none are posted. The only rules I've heard are that you cannot be in the studio during another classes formal class time...that studio hours are set with the hours the front desk keeps (usually 8 AM -9PM), that no alcohol is allowed in the studio...and now I hear...no production work is allowed. Open studio hours are usually unsupervised and you are responsible for cleaning up your own mess. It was also mentioned that you should always ASK to use other people's things. Just because they are there doesn't mean they are yours to borrow when you are in studio.

As far as things coming up missing...it's a college, folks. We were told to lock our finished work up (or take it home, duh) right before Christmas because, I'm told, in years past some students did a bit of "Christmas shopping" out of the studio via work from the last Semester. That is why I keep my tools in a locked box....dopey me. Still have em all too...LOL.

And no, I didn't take the stuff. (explicitive with clown implications deleted)

FWIW, I'm a guy.....53.

I hope you find a workable approach for your studio, clay lover.

teardrop
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. Dr. Seuss US author & illustrator (1904 - 1991)

#23 trina

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 10:11 AM

Hi,

My studio is open only two mornings a week to potters (and one morning to painters) I charge the potters a monthly fee and let them come any 4 times in the month. I figure the same thing happens in a fitness studio or other group that charges by the month whether you come or not. It also means that at the beginning of each month I know where I stand. I only allow my very regular students to pay per time if they are travelling or have some other reason why they cannot attend. However then I charge more pro rata. If you aren't sure about your costs and what to charge, you must must and I mean it in the nicest way must figure it out. You cannot subsidize no shows and people who are not as committed as others. If that scares you because you think that you will lose people, well maybe you will but if you treat it like a business then you need to advertise and you will get others. No shows and empty seats cost, not only that they don't come but they take up shelve space and impead the regs. I also charge for extra other classes, mold making ect unless the group decides that they all want to learn one thing in a lesson.

The most important thing to figure out is what your intention is. Do you want a school? Do you want enough students so you can spend the rest of your time producing for yourself? Do you want to share space with one or more other artists and not teach? Do you only want to work for yourself? Are you good enough to? Ect ect

I would be more than happy to share all my mistakes with you. It is a hard battle so at least know what you want.

Trina

#24 Chris Campbell

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 10:37 AM

Our local crafts center sells the clay to students at double the listed catalogue price. This covers the cost of glaze and firing ... also, I have to hope they are buying in large enough volumes to be getting a much lower price ... so making a bit more.
I don't teach from my studio but if I did I think I would go with the "monthly fee gets you x open sessions that month". It's up to them to show up and use it, just like a gym. No carry overs. That is the only way I can see to predict your income without having to be everyone's monitor. This would not include any set lessons from me, but I would be there to answer questions, offer advice and prevent mayhem. A four week themed class by me or a guest would be extra.

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#25 Pres

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Posted 30 December 2011 - 01:32 PM

This is an off shoot from another thread that developed a different direction due to comments about someone having problems selling work from their college studio and 'policies'. Trina suggested a new thread on this and related issues and I agree, so here it it.


I teach from my home studio and also do my own work there and It would be great to know how others are doing this and managing the different things that come up. Such as;
Pricing of class time
management of student personalities
Separating your work , glazes, materials from student's work,
Use of space available


My first question, one I am trying to answer for myself,.
My students always want to do bigger and more complex pieces that they are really ready for. How do I rein them in without discouraging them?
In the studio shelving, they see large forms, moulds, that I use for my sale pieces and want to use them. Problem is, the pieces are to big for them to manage, and I also don't want to make everything I use for my sales line to be used by my students to produces pieces that would be similar but not so well done as the one's I make for the local market. Same form, same glaze, ect. I don't have room to separate everything and still be able to do my work in the same studio.


In reply to your original thread here. I taught in a hs for 30+ years, working with all sorts of students from physically handicapped kids to intelligent well coordinated adults. Over the years many of these would want to do something bigger, more outrageous or off the wall than others in the class might want to attempt. I never discouraged them, and always mad certain that their experience was as rich and successful as possible. I would keep constant watch that they were doing thing right, handling things well, and were successful in creating what they wanted. I did this for several reasons-first I was and am a teacher-I teach, its me! Secondly, the energy and exploration they would have would rub off on others-raising the overall experience and energy level of the entire class. In the end, it was always a win/win for me and the students. There were tools, and clays, and items that I would keep aside-locked away, hidden in drawers no one knew about etc. These were things that got pulled out when a special problem or need came about-helping me to solve the problem. Over the years the one to benefit the most form all of the student exploration, or wishing to work outside of the box was me. I usually had to research some form, technique, or process that I had not done before. This would lead me to make special tools or dies, create new glaze colors, fire at different temperatures for things like lusters and multiple firings, come up with joining process for odd shapes, and a slew of other unnamable skills and knowledge.

I would love to have a studio large enough to hold classes, and immerse myself in the problems of student work again, but alas don't think it will happen.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#26 clay lover

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 09:28 AM

Many thoughtful responses, thanks, all.

Trina, when you have open studio, how do you manage to not have more people show up that you have space for? I don't want to get into managing a different sort of scheduling. I had thought about that approach, 'these are the open days come as many or as few as you want, every one pays the same.' Is that an easier approach than pay for what you use, time wise? These are people I know and are trustworthy.

Pres, I'm like you in that I must teach. I get great rewards from my students lighting up at a new idea, and enjoy their enthusiasm. I have been doing lessons for 3 years and my students have pushed me in directions I would not have taken and alwys present some sort of project that takes all my clay experience and then some to answer.

Trina, you have asked some good questions. No, I don't want a school. When I started the classes I need to pay for my studio and it was a good way to have income. Now I have achieved that and am planning forward.
I think my over all goal, besides that of needing to teach what I love, is to have good company in the studio, some of the time, some non sales generated income and to develope an appreciation for the clay arts in my community. There are very few potters near me.
I have 2 students now that are ready and have the personality to come in, choose their projects, and work independently.

Another question about pricing. I had a set price for the 5 day workshops, came out to $24 for a 3 hour session. What is reasonable to charge for no prepped clay and no planned lesson but assistance when needed and all tools, glazes and materials ? They would have to buy their clay from me, I have been including it, They would be doing clean up and dealing with their own clay and reclaim as they choose.
I appreciate more experienced potters helping me work this out.Posted Image

#27 teardrop

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 10:51 AM

I'm guessing that there are many facilities such as this one around the country that rent studio time//hold classes/etc. and are open to the public.

Hopefully some of the info on this page will be pertinent for you, clay lover.

https://www.alpinear...-drop-ins/adult

We broke down the cost of our college classes...it works out to about $20 per week for class and unfettered (almost) access to the studio. ($282 for the Semester course, no credit..no grade ala a "Lifelong Learning program"). Such is why we keep signing up!

good luck in your endeavor

teardrop


Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. Dr. Seuss US author & illustrator (1904 - 1991)

#28 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 11:22 AM

That is really cheap! WOW! Our students pay of $95 for a lab fee for each studio art class plus university fees for tuition, technology, athletics and use of the rec center.
I think it is expensive but the lab fee must stretch to cover the operations of the ceramics facility from kiln shelves, glaze chemical, clay, sieves,
coils, etc. plus the shipping to get it down here from Austin to the most South tip of Texas. I am doing the maintenance too.
Marcia

#29 trina

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 11:59 AM

Many thoughtful responses, thanks, all.

Trina, when you have open studio, how do you manage to not have more people show up that you have space for? I don't want to get into managing a different sort of scheduling. I had thought about that approach, 'these are the open days come as many or as few as you want, every one pays the same.' Is that an easier approach than pay for what you use, time wise? These are people I know and are trustworthy.

Pres, I'm like you in that I must teach. I get great rewards from my students lighting up at a new idea, and enjoy their enthusiasm. I have been doing lessons for 3 years and my students have pushed me in directions I would not have taken and alwys present some sort of project that takes all my clay experience and then some to answer.

Trina, you have asked some good questions. No, I don't want a school. When I started the classes I need to pay for my studio and it was a good way to have income. Now I have achieved that and am planning forward.
I think my over all goal, besides that of needing to teach what I love, is to have good company in the studio, some of the time, some non sales generated income and to develope an appreciation for the clay arts in my community. There are very few potters near me.
I have 2 students now that are ready and have the personality to come in, choose their projects, and work independently.




just screwed up my answer and lost it... will try again....trina


Another question about pricing. I had a set price for the 5 day workshops, came out to $24 for a 3 hour session. What is reasonable to charge for no prepped clay and no planned lesson but assistance when needed and all tools, glazes and materials ? They would have to buy their clay from me, I have been including it, They would be doing clean up and dealing with their own clay and reclaim as they choose.
I appreciate more experienced potters helping me work this out.Posted Image



#30 trina

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Posted 31 December 2011 - 02:15 PM


Many thoughtful responses, thanks, all.

Trina, when you have open studio, how do you manage to not have more people show up that you have space for? I don't want to get into managing a different sort of scheduling. I had thought about that approach, 'these are the open days come as many or as few as you want, every one pays the same.' Is that an easier approach than pay for what you use, time wise? These are people I know and are trustworthy.

Pres, I'm like you in that I must teach. I get great rewards from my students lighting up at a new idea, and enjoy their enthusiasm. I have been doing lessons for 3 years and my students have pushed me in directions I would not have taken and alwys present some sort of project that takes all my clay experience and then some to answer.

Trina, you have asked some good questions. No, I don't want a school. When I started the classes I need to pay for my studio and it was a good way to have income. Now I have achieved that and am planning forward.
I think my over all goal, besides that of needing to teach what I love, is to have good company in the studio, some of the time, some non sales generated income and to develope an appreciation for the clay arts in my community. There are very few potters near me.
I have 2 students now that are ready and have the personality to come in, choose their projects, and work independently.




just screwed up my answer and lost it... will try again....trina


Another question about pricing. I had a set price for the 5 day workshops, came out to $24 for a 3 hour session. What is reasonable to charge for no prepped clay and no planned lesson but assistance when needed and all tools, glazes and materials ? They would have to buy their clay from me, I have been including it, They would be doing clean up and dealing with their own clay and reclaim as they choose.
I appreciate more experienced potters helping me work this out.Posted Image



OK hi again, let me see if it works this time.


OK I would say that you need a business plan, to figure out what you should be charging. I never charge double for the clay with the expectation that that covers the cost for anything else. I know from experience that i use 12kg of unprepared clay per session. I know through experience what that means in terms of kiln volume (as I know what they are making and we normally have a max size for projects) and my firing schedule (kiln wear and tear costs and electicity). Take an inventory of your studio and then figure out what it will cost each month to keep the levels up. I then know I need to spent xxx Euros in material costs every month.

Write down what your expenses are. Think of everything that costs you money. So rent, electric, materials, material wear and tear, starting costs (tools that you own and use tables equipment ect ect) accountancy fees, taxes, Do you supply coffees and cake... toilet paper cleaning supplies : just whatever costs you write down. Then divide that amount with the maxium amount of students /other artists you can cope with. If your goal is to have money to pay for your studio that covers it. Then your own work is where you start to make a living.... don't confuse this with profit :) profit comes way way long time later...;)

As my studio is open twice a week to potters, I charge by the month so I know the number that I will have more or less (but don't worry too much about it as they have then paid) But they themselves have arranged to come either on Monday or Wednesday. Sometimes a Monday person will come on a Wednesday but as I have a large studio and we can accomodate it. Rarely /nearly never do I have everyone at once, communicate and students communicate back.


Really it sounds to me like you should convince your two students to join your studio as fellow artisits and share the expenses if that doesnt cramp you personally too much.

I don't know if anything that I wrote helps you but that has been my personal experience....just ask if you wanna know more.

Trina

#31 MoKa Kath

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 02:32 PM

Hi folks. First posting from me; thought I'd chime in with an idea on the "what if they all turn up at once" question.

How about using technology to manage that? Set up a Google calendar for each workstation that can be shared with each studio user (they get access as part of their 'membership' benefits). Then they can all see when a slot is available to come in and work. If someone books a slot and then doesn't turn up, they lose one of their set sessions for the month.

If they book and cancel at short notice (say less than 24 hours in advance) and this results in the slot not being used or denying someone else an opportunity to use it, decide on a forfeit such as "three strikes and you're out" where they lose a session on third strike or something between that and immediately losing a session.

Loving this forum and can't believe I didn't spot it before. I used to be on the Clayart list although a lot of it went over my head, but I picked up some knowledge that has stayed with me. Nice to see some familiar names here from that discussion mailing list. :D

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#32 JeanB

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 04:28 PM

This is an off shoot from another thread that developed a different direction due to comments about someone having problems selling work from their college studio and 'policies'. Trina suggested a new thread on this and related issues and I agree, so here it it.


I teach from my home studio and also do my own work there and It would be great to know how others are doing this and managing the different things that come up. Such as;
Pricing of class time
management of student personalities
Separating your work , glazes, materials from student's work,
Use of space available


My first question, one I am trying to answer for myself,.
My students always want to do bigger and more complex pieces that they are really ready for. How do I rein them in without discouraging them?
In the studio shelving, they see large forms, moulds, that I use for my sale pieces and want to use them. Problem is, the pieces are to big for them to manage, and I also don't want to make everything I use for my sales line to be used by my students to produces pieces that would be similar but not so well done as the one's I make for the local market. Same form, same glaze, ect. I don't have room to separate everything and still be able to do my work in the same studio.



#33 JeanB

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 04:31 PM

Hi,

My studio is open only two mornings a week to potters (and one morning to painters) I charge the potters a monthly fee and let them come any 4 times in the month. I figure the same thing happens in a fitness studio or other group that charges by the month whether you come or not. It also means that at the beginning of each month I know where I stand. I only allow my very regular students to pay per time if they are travelling or have some other reason why they cannot attend. However then I charge more pro rata. If you aren't sure about your costs and what to charge, you must must and I mean it in the nicest way must figure it out. You cannot subsidize no shows and people who are not as committed as others. If that scares you because you think that you will lose people, well maybe you will but if you treat it like a business then you need to advertise and you will get others. No shows and empty seats cost, not only that they don't come but they take up shelve space and impead the regs. I also charge for extra other classes, mold making ect unless the group decides that they all want to learn one thing in a lesson.

The most important thing to figure out is what your intention is. Do you want a school? Do you want enough students so you can spend the rest of your time producing for yourself? Do you want to share space with one or more other artists and not teach? Do you only want to work for yourself? Are you good enough to? Ect ect

I would be more than happy to share all my mistakes with you. It is a hard battle so at least know what you want.

Trina



#34 Madmingei

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 06:55 PM



I would like to jump in to this discussion and respond to Claylover's questions above: I have been teaching in my studio for nearly 25 years and am about to expand to a commercial building and employ other artist-potters to teach with me. I started off with just 4 students per class and a couple of classes per week, now it is 7 students per class and in my new studio I will be able to have 12 to a class, two classes running concurrently and around the clock. It used to simply provide a stable cash flow and supplement to my income from my ceramic work but it took over a few years ago and even though I still consider myself a potter first and exhibit widely, I am now also firmly attached to my identity as a teacher. My impending expansion is a result of having a large waiting list and not being able to satisfy demand.


My first degree was Art Education (specialising in Ceramics) and I followed that with 5 years of trad apprenticeship-style training in Australia and Japan and then an MA in Ceramics. I take my teaching very seriously and have taught in tertiary institutions, a secondary school and many guest residencies and workshops but my studio classes are the most rewarding and I value them and my students enormously. They choose me! My educational philosophy guides my methodology. It is all about recognising the individual pathway but guiding students within a strong skill-based structure. Rules are only helpful at first - then they are meant to be broken! It is a pleasure to be able to help my students reach their goals and open the world of ceramics to them and I know I can pass on some of the hard-earned lessons from my teachers that I fear will die if they are not passed on. Teaching is therefore my duty as well. But I never forget I am privileged to be able to teach and I also learn from my students all the time.


I always price my time according to standard business principles: hours worked(including packing kilns) x price per hour desired (my price per hour has gone up over the years as I have increased in self-confidence and realise I provide a pretty unique product but it is still on a par with other classes and I wouldn't want to charge a lot more). I average my overheads and materials and incorporate these costs into the class fee. (I don't like fiddling around with weighing) I have an amount of work that I consider reasonable and if advanced students exceed this amount they are given the choice to either keep and pay a flat extra firing charge or re-cycle the clay. I always encourage students to aim high and value the process of learning above the product. I do have some terms and conditions that students sign in their enrolment form. This includes not selling their work commercially. When students are good enough to sell their work commercially I tell them, encourage them, and suggest they move on and get their own studio. They are not students any more - even though we are all learning all our lives - they have to take responsibility for their whole production if they want to sell commercially. I also don't want any repercussions on my insurance if something goes wrong with their work!


Student personalities: I've hardly ever had any problems. I respect and value everyone and follow some simple humanistic principles. There have been times when some students have been challenging but honestly, compared to a class of Year 9 or 10 kids it is nothing! That's where my teacher training has been really helpful! I also recognise that there are as many different reasons for coming to my classes as there are students and I don't push a particular line. I am excited by open discussions about art and ceramics and I think my students respond to my passion and to being treated with equal respect and integrity.


Separation of work: that's another reason I am expanding! There is no more space at home and I am very much looking forward to having my home studio back to myself! I have a large damp cupboard and a large storage rack for students that is separate from my own. Both can fit about 20 student's work (on 1.2m long boards) but above that it gets pretty tight. I also have to continually wrap student's work when leather-hard to stall it from drying. This is a real hassel (suggestions welcome please!!) The only comment I would make is that students do value being in a professional artist's studio and seeing work of a (hopefully) higher standard around to inspire them. The opportunity to use my work as teaching resources, ie to illustrate different aspects of form or surface, sometimes works in my favour as a "soft-sell" whereby the students end up purchasing a piece! It is a nice outcome and I always give them a discount!


Space: I have an area for classes within my studio, about 18m2, and the wheels are a fold-up style and pushed under the tables when not in use. I can expand into that space when I'm working on my own work in between classes but then have to move stuff back when its class time. It is a hassel but its the downside of teaching in my studio. Glazing is only done in the final lesson of the term (8-week term) so wheels are packed away, glazes brought out onto the tables and the whole cycle is finished with a firing that I do for them.


I hope this is helpful. I have a question for anyone in a similar situation: given I will have the potential for a few hundred students in my new studio, space is going to be even more of a premium! Does anyone have any suggestions for good storage solutions for work in between classes that allows work to dry slowly (over a week) ??? It must be well-insulated for that reason. I've been looking at loads of shelving solutions online and not found anything insulating.....
Thanks for this forum site, happy potting and happy 2012!

#35 Sojourner

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 09:38 PM

I do have some terms and conditions that students sign in their enrolment form. This includes not selling their work commercially. When students are good enough to sell their work commercially I tell them... I also don't want any repercussions on my insurance if something goes wrong with their work!


I get the part about insurance concerns, but as a student, I'll decide for myself when and if I want to sell a piece. I don't need anyone else's permission to do so. I'm fortunate to have my own wheel now, and I have access to community studio kilns for a reasonable cost.

I'm much more critical of my own work than anyone else. As a successful silversmith for many years, I can tell when something is salable, and frankly my standards are higher than many "professional" potters I have known.

I appreciate that you must be going that extra mile, to feel that you don't have problems with "student personalities", I think that takes a really special mindset to work in practice. But I wouldn't give up my right to dispose of the products of my labors as *I* see fit. This would be an insurmountable obstacle for me, though clearly it doesn't seem to be for a majority of your students. I may be a student, but I am not a supplicant, and I just would not give up my right to control the disposition of my work when and as I choose.

I'm a long way from trying to sell anything I make, but that is my decision to make, and no one else's (other, of course, than any hypothetical buyers).

"I don't need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me."
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#36 Growin' Granny

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 01:02 AM


.... Separation of work: that's another reason I am expanding! There is no more space at home and I am very much looking forward to having my home studio back to myself! I have a large damp cupboard and a large storage rack for students that is separate from my own. Both can fit about 20 student's work (on 1.2m long boards) but above that it gets pretty tight. I also have to continually wrap student's work when leather-hard to stall it from drying. This is a real hassel (suggestions welcome please!!)

...snip....



During the winter I work in an outdoor studio in the desert and we use old, non-functional refrigerators to store work in progress and slow down drying on completed work. In especially difficult weather when work is drying too quickly even while wrapped in plastic in the refrigerators, we put a wet towel into the refrigerator to increase humidity.

Sheila Maier


“A good traveler has no fixed plans and is not intent on arriving.” – Lao Tzu

#37 trina

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 09:10 AM


I do have some terms and conditions that students sign in their enrolment form. This includes not selling their work commercially. When students are good enough to sell their work commercially I tell them... I also don't want any repercussions on my insurance if something goes wrong with their work!


I get the part about insurance concerns, but as a student, I'll decide for myself when and if I want to sell a piece. I don't need anyone else's permission to do so. I'm fortunate to have my own wheel now, and I have access to community studio kilns for a reasonable cost.

I'm much more critical of my own work than anyone else. As a successful silversmith for many years, I can tell when something is salable, and frankly my standards are higher than many "professional" potters I have known.

I appreciate that you must be going that extra mile, to feel that you don't have problems with "student personalities", I think that takes a really special mindset to work in practice. But I wouldn't give up my right to dispose of the products of my labors as *I* see fit. This would be an insurmountable obstacle for me, though clearly it doesn't seem to be for a majority of your students. I may be a student, but I am not a supplicant, and I just would not give up my right to control the disposition of my work when and as I choose.

I'm a long way from trying to sell anything I make, but that is my decision to make, and no one else's (other, of course, than any hypothetical buyers).

"I don't need you to remind me of my age. I have a bladder to do that for me."
-- Stephen Fry


Hi again, I guess that is the good part of owning my studio. I am gonna sound like my father here but it guess it plays true : as long as I pay the rent I get to make the rules ;9 Happy Potting Trina

#38 GEP

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 10:42 AM

"I get the part about insurance concerns, but as a student, I'll decide for myself when and if I want to sell a piece. I don't need anyone else's permission to do so."

Sojourner, Yes you have to right to decide if your work is ready for sale, but if you are using someone else's studio and equipment to produce it, that person does indeed have the right to restrict you from doing so. madmingei's policy sounds just right to me. If I had students in my home studio, I wouldn't mind if they wanted to sell an occasional pot to an aquaintance. But if a student wanted to start applying to art fairs and supplying to galleries, I would tell them it was time for them to undertake the responsibilties of their own studio.

Mea
Mea Rhee
Good Elephant Pottery
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#39 Chris Campbell

Chris Campbell

    clay stained since 1988

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 11:09 AM

I have to agree ... Once you start into serious sales you need to get out of the nest ... Even if you need to be pushed! This is good for you and the teaching studio. You need to get full control of your work ... The whole process. Nothing worse for both sides than you needing work for a show and no room in the community kiln.

Chris Campbell
Contemporary Fine Colored Porcelain
www.ccpottery.com

TRY ...   FAIL ...  LEARN ...  REPEAT


#40 teardrop

teardrop

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 12:26 PM

If a person buys their own clay and throws pots on their own wheel...then pays what the studio itself sets as firing rates for their firings....

the consensus here is that the person has no right to sell their own work?

are you afraid of the competition, folks?

much respect, sojourner.
Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind. Dr. Seuss US author & illustrator (1904 - 1991)




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