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potterymadmatthew

Glazes

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Are you planning to do a base coat, then drip a different color over top of that?

 

I use a nasal aspirator (Baby Snot Sucker) to drip/ splatter glaze.  I initially drip a bit, and add more, if I want the drip to go further.  Keep in mind, the drips will run more, when fired, as it becomes liquid.  I don't allow students to drip much beyond half way down, the outside of a project, as a general rule.  The inside, they can drip as far as they want, as it can run off the project.

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Dripping glazes . . . not sure what you mean. Some oilspots develop a luscious drip off the side to near the kiln shelf -- is that what you are looking for? Or a glaze that can be applied and runs and blends with other glazes on the side of a vessel? Could you post a picture of what you would like to attempt?

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Are you planning to do a base coat, then drip a different color over top of that?

 

I use a nasal aspirator (Baby Snot Sucker) to drip/ splatter glaze.  I initially drip a bit, and add more, if I want the drip to go further.  Keep in mind, the drips will run more, when fired, as it becomes liquid.  I don't allow students to drip much beyond half way down, the outside of a project, as a general rule.  The inside, they can drip as far as they want, as it can run off the project.

Yes that is what I am planning to do. I do it as a hobby at home and get someone else to fire it for me. I buy pottery from studios with the item price and firing fee is all so included. So its very good for me that they trust me. I am using glazes and not just kids paints. Thanks for your help I will buy one of those now.

 

Thanks

Matthew

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Dripping glazes . . . not sure what you mean. Some oilspots develop a luscious drip off the side to near the kiln shelf -- is that what you are looking for? Or a glaze that can be applied and runs and blends with other glazes on the side of a vessel? Could you post a picture of what you would like to attempt?

9e2af67c475eb023ac706526fa89706a.jpg

This is what I am trying to achieve.

 

Thanks

Matthew

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Yep, a good ol' snot sucker will be able to accomplish that.  Though, a very liquid glaze, like many dipping glazes, would do that on its own.  Just dunk the ware top first, pull it out of the glaze, and invert so it is right side up.  The glaze would dribble down the sides.  The only downside is, it will dribble down, wherever it feels like.

 

If you are simply brushing on glazes, then the nasal aspirator is probably the way to go.  Just a final note on those.  Squeeze them from the back, with your thumb, not from the sides.  I keep emphasizing this with students, as that's how they are designed to be used.  I've had some split on the back, because they were continually squeezed from the sides.

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The ones I have have a raised bit around the circumference of the bulb making it easier to squeeze from the side. I cannot see the advantage of pushing from the back unless it is more comfortable in your hands.

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Are you planning to do a base coat, then drip a different color over top of that?

 

I use a nasal aspirator (Baby Snot Sucker) to drip/ splatter glaze.  I initially drip a bit, and add more, if I want the drip to go further.  Keep in mind, the drips will run more, when fired, as it becomes liquid.  I don't allow students to drip much beyond half way down, the outside of a project, as a general rule.  The inside, they can drip as far as they want, as it can run off the project.

Hello good morning could you tell me what a marbling glaze is?As I am interested in this!

 

Thanks

Matthew

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Benzine, is the reason to squeeze from the back simply to avoid them splitting, or is it a better technique?

 

 

The ones I have have a raised bit around the circumference of the bulb making it easier to squeeze from the side. I cannot see the advantage of pushing from the back unless it is more comfortable in your hands.

 

 

It definitely works by squeezing from the sides, but as I mentioned, I've had some split along the back, when repeatedly used this way.  Also, if you squeeze from the back, it forces the air, and any other contents forward, towards the nozzle.  If you squeeze from the sides, some of the air and contents can go towards the back.

 

flowerdry, I don't know if this is a better technique, but it makes the aspirators last longer, in my experience.

 

 

Are you planning to do a base coat, then drip a different color over top of that?

 

I use a nasal aspirator (Baby Snot Sucker) to drip/ splatter glaze.  I initially drip a bit, and add more, if I want the drip to go further.  Keep in mind, the drips will run more, when fired, as it becomes liquid.  I don't allow students to drip much beyond half way down, the outside of a project, as a general rule.  The inside, they can drip as far as they want, as it can run off the project.

Hello good morning could you tell me what a marbling glaze is?As I am interested in this!

 

Thanks

Matthew

 

 

I don't have a lot of experience marbling.  I've assisted students, in marbling underglazes, which involved putting lines of different colors side by side, then slightly tilting the surface, to cause them to swirl around each other.  You can also take a pointed tool, and drag through the lines, to create the effect too.  I would imagine marbling with glazes would be the same idea.  Though underglazes or slips would generally work better, as they will keep the same precise edge, when fired, where glazes will bleed into each other slightly.

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