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preeta

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  1. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Phoebe3 in Imco Mid-Fire Clay Reviews Wanted   
    phoebe i would not eliminate great white without trying out a bag first. i've learnt my lesson from B mix. some people LOVE Bmix. others dislike it. some people have problems with Bmix and others wonder what are you talking about. 
     
    starry night is a particularly newer clay for IMCO. if you want to try out the ilmenite i would say go to alpha and buy Speckled Buff. the speckles are from ilmenite. big pieces. really beautiful with matte glazes. or satin glazes. i think in starry night its ground up so no speckles. i've done ^5 reduction with speckled buff and no - not a good idea. 
     
    also if you can get to alpha fired arts try out their red stone vs. IMCO Navajo Wheel. i love red stone. i love how it throws. i love how it dries. i love how malleable it is even when leather hard so i can still change its form. its my favorite clay body ever. but navajo wheel i find different. not my fav. too sandy and brittle. if i try to trim it when a little too dry instead of partial ribbons i get crumbles. 
     
    your question was about vitrification. what i have learnt from this board is that if you are a professional potter you dont just believe the stats. you test it out. really if its about business i'd really test it just for myself. 
     
    just so you know i met a ^6 production potter yesterday and she uses Bmix without grog and speckled buff. the production potters who i have met who get their clay from IMCO - do ^10 firing and use their 811Buff and red. 
     
    sadly i have not come across a ^6 white body that i like. 
  2. Like
    preeta reacted to glazenerd in Clay Buyers Guide   
    Originally published in February 2019 issue of Ceramics Monthly, pages 66,67, & 68. http://www.ceramicsmonthly.org . Copyright, The American Ceramic Society. Reprinted with permission."
    techno File section: Clay Body Shopping
     
     
     
    Nerd
  3. Like
    preeta reacted to bciskepottery in Surface Technique With Slip   
    You have found "a" technique, not "the" technique. There are many ways to achieve a distressed look -- and you do not necessarily have to take a wire brush to your clay or use some overseas formulated heavy grog clay. Yes, the clay body can help -- but you can also use clay slips (think layers not single applications; think thin slip and thick slip), different types of brushes for application -- stiff bristles vs soft bristles, long vs short nap, dry vs wet; dry-looking glazes, engobes, oxide and mason stain washes, tools (spackling knives and plaster tools for application, cleaning the blade vs leaving some slip on the harden and give an irregular surface for the next application), and multiple firings to achieve the look (although you can do it with single firings, too).
     
    It takes practice and repetition to learn to relax while applying the slips, etc. Sometimes you get lucky -- I remember one day my hand cramped while applying slip and the brush dropped on the slab and gave the most unusual pattern. Many of these techniques require patience -- working with the clay is ready to be manipulated -- you can't force the look. Keep practicing and experimenting.
     
    A couple to look at . . .
     
    Lana Wilson (she is known for more than magic water) http://lwilso2.otherpeoplespixels.com/home.html
     
    Jim Robison http://www.boothhousegallery.co.uk/Also, his book with Ian Marsh "Slab Techniques"
     
    Eric Serritella http://ericserritella.com/eric/
     
    https://youtu.be/ueDTA6dPGA4
  4. Like
    preeta reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Crater Slip   
    I have use corn meal in porcelain slip to produce 'craters' when fired.  It was applied with a brush or spatula.  If you used large sized needles from veterinarian syringes probably would work for semi-fine lines.  I got the idea from a book on Lucie Rie's work.  One of her signature series was a white clay body with pockmarks all over - supposedly due to rice added to the surface layer.
     
    LT
  5. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Phoebe3 in Imco Mid-Fire Clay Reviews Wanted   
    those who use great white at our community college end up changing clays because great white has a tendency to crack very easily. those who throw thin dont enjoy throwing with great white. 
     
    no one has ever had any problems with vitrification. 
  6. Like
    preeta reacted to oldlady in Thick Texture Slip   
    if you simplify your thinking, you might realize that the addition of what you call slip is merely the thickening of part of the wall of the pot.  nothing sacred, special or scary about it, you are just adding some more clay that happens to be very wet.  putting it into a pleasing shape will simply add a pleasing shape to the pot.  whatever covering you choose later is the same as covering the original pot, just a little thicker some places.
  7. Like
    preeta got a reaction from nancylee in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    nancylee pardon me for saying it. i can only say it by being politically incorrect. and i dont know what the correct word is.
     
    this is an issue i see wherever there is a wheel. all the time. doesnt matter the age. or experience. 
     
    and i dont know if fear is the right word. but its easier for me to say it. its this holding back. as oldlady said just be a wall. essentially you are being a human jigger.
     
    if you have truly understood the principle of centering then the amount should not matter. if you can move a 4lb bag of cat litter you can also move a 20lb of cat litter. you just have to come up with a different plan.
     
    i have found just being dogged and pushing through helps. 
     
    everytime i throw an extra lb of clay its almost like starting all over again. i have to figure out how to manage more clay with the human tools i have. i have to figure out how to stay in control of the clay. 
     
    if you throw regularly on weekdays then dont start throwing 4lbs on monday. get your body going and then throw midweek. 
     
    i still havent figured out centering yet. completely. many teachers have tried to show me. but my body and brain havent fully understood it yet. i am still centering as a beginner (by that i mean i lose some clay while centering). i havent had any help to show me how to throw bigger so i have had to figure out myself. thinking of a wall and jigger has really helped me. sitting the right way has helped a lot. 
     
    i cant bear to see fellow students suffer. so i offer advice even when not asked for or needed. simple things like move your stool closer and lean in more... and it all makes such a big difference. or they are about to stop and i tell them. dont. do more shape more. now you know how to make that size. if you fail and make a hole you can throw another one like that. so push and see how big you can really get. 
     
    but as pres said just throw, throw, throw. that's how i got passed 3 lbs. just dig your heels in and dont give up. 
     
    MARCIA - i wish profs would do what you did. but i see now a fear of touching. esp. if you are a male teacher. most of the students are female. it makes such a big difference. since i have lots of gray hair i no longer am afraid and girl or boy i touch and show the pressure. i always get a shocked response. 
  8. Like
    preeta reacted to Min in How To Achieve This Kind Of Marble Effect?   
    I'm going with cast marbled slip. Have a peek at this persons work, looks like the same technique was used.


  9. Like
    preeta reacted to terrim8 in How To Achieve This Kind Of Marble Effect?   
    I think it is 2 clays wedged together. Heavy on the black, light on the white, then maybe a black slip on the interior. Pretty sure it looks like a neatly metal or rubber ribbed surface.
  10. Like
    preeta reacted to LeeU in Lake Superior Agate, To Provide The Silica For Jun Glaze   
    envy envy   Your are very fortunate to be able to get this stuff and do as you wish with it ! Hope you will post some post-fire pieces here or in the Gallery.
  11. Like
    preeta reacted to oldlady in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    the best advice i ever got for centering was "let the wheel do the work".   my hand was only a steel rod tucked into my body to help keep it from moving with the clay.
     
    at one time, ceramics monthly had a tip, use your forearm for a large lump of clay.  and to avoid bloodshed, use a leather boot with the foot cut off to protect the arm.
     
    it worked.
  12. Like
    preeta reacted to Pres in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    As I have said before, there are so many ways to center, and to throwing. I was demonstating this weekend-bowls. I did a 3 lb bowl, opening up with my hand, and throwing with only the aid of a sponge. This to show the "purist" attitude that I dealt with 30 years ago, where ribs were crutches. Then I threw a 15 lb bowl using my lft forearm to center, and my rt elbow to open up supporting the rt wrist with the left hand. So this showed that well centered piece of clay could be opened without using support on the outside. I also used ribs at in the shaping showing that you could move a rib up and down to expand the form without a hand on the outside to support the form. Again lots of fallacies out there, and habits that get broken after more experience on the wheel. Should a beginner try to open without the other hand for support, probably not. However, the options are there as you get comfortable with throwing, and the only way to get comfortable is throw. . .  throw . . . throw!
     
    best,
    Pres
  13. Like
    preeta reacted to glazenerd in Slip Recipes   
    This one looks like it is worth exploring; I could see both glaze and slip variations.
     
      Nerd
  14. Like
    preeta reacted to GiselleNo5 in Youtube Video Potters   
    I can see that everyone I personally love to watch has already been mentioned so I won't repeat that. 
     
    Instead here is the best advice I have for anybody: Watch as many videos as you can find of different people doing similar things even if you aren't a fan of their finished product or their style. Read as many articles as you can find on the internet or in magazines. Get pottery books of all levels. I have been doing that for five years. I didn't start wheel throwing until two years ago and I can tell you that all that reading and all those videos, all that information that I wasn't ready to use at the time, came back to me when I needed it. Every once in a while I go back and watch or read my favorites and I get something different out of them every time. Each time I watch a really amazing thrower in videos or workshops in person, I go home and try different moves and my throwing at this point is such a mishmash of other people's hand movements that I could not tell you really where each bit and piece came from. This patchwork makes up MY style, which is still developing and changing since I am such a new thrower. 
     
    In a nutshell: be voracious. Gobble up every scrap of information you can. People spend a lifetime in clay and continue to be surprised. Enjoy the ride.  
  15. Like
    preeta reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Youtube Video Potters   
    Since the OP wanted video recommendations or other resources that can be gleaned from the interwebs and Preeta mentioned books, I want to suggest Clary Illian's "A Potter's Workbook." It doesn't teach you to throw per se, but it gets you thinking about what's involved in making good pots. It's a series of exercises for the person that can throw a 2 lb cylinder that is twice as tall as it is wide, and is ready to start thinking about how to make a good pot.
     
     
    The problem with choosing internet instruction like this, or indeed even any teacher in real life, is that you're judging them on their output, not on how their other students are doing. And you don't know that the information you've found is questionable until you find better information, one way or another. The problem with being a beginner is that you don't know how much you don't know. Edited to add: I don't think anyone is wrong for seeking out whatever they can in the time and place they have allotted to them. You can only begin from the place you are standing. I say use what you have available, and remedy anything you feel needs it as you can.  
    I think that the YouTube potters mentioned so far in this thread offer some pretty reasonable instruction within the offered framework. I have been to a Steven Hill workshop IRL. The online out takes from some of his other workshops track quite closely to my personal experience, and I think if he offers videos for sale or online, they're probably worthwhile. He's the rare beast that is a good instructor and a good potter.
  16. Like
    preeta got a reaction from flowerdry in Youtube Video Potters   
    stephen i wish the answer was easy.
     
    i am a community college student, have taken classes with a professional potter/retired professor and an avid youtube watcher. 
     
    i have found you need your hands in many pies.
     
    for instance if you watch hsen cheun lin he rarely trims the rim of his pots. he is a pro. as a beginner i had to trim mine all the time to be in control of my pot. i watch a lot of people throwing. there is no one who gives ALL the info. i learnt coning from one person who mentioned it because he was throwing tall. watching potters from india and pakistan and nepal i learnt how you can use the trapped air to help you with your hand built form.
     
    i've had 3 professors teach me clay. i will be adding a couple more in the coming years. if i am lucky i can add another one. because i have found i have learnt different things from the different profs.
     
    of course even that is not enough because i am here asking questions.
     
    i mean little things make such a huge difference. for example - on another thread someone talked about opening up the cylinder wider than necessary to help with the bottom thickness. huge difference. the prof. potter and ex prof. put her hand on top of mine and we pushed in for a bowl to get me to understand how much pressure one needs to really use all the clay.
     
    to me i think a basic book is important. rather than just youtube. hands in clay. or a beginning how to pottery book. goes over some basic info right from teh beginning that you would otherwise spend weeks trying to figure out. things like how much pressure, where your hands should be while centering, where you should pull up and why. esp. if all you have is youtube. 
     
    however here i am talking about wheel throwing. even for handbuilding though - there are good videos out there. i've learnt a lot of tips from the CAD videos too. i've watched NCECA demos and other demos too. 
     
    some videos have great explanations that help.
     
    so far i have not run into any 'bad' pottery videos. or misinformed videos. first what i do is check and see who the person is and how many videos they have uploaded. 
     
    i've watched goldmark videos on potters. i've watched different cultural potters and noticed how their ways were different. i have been lucky to find good demos on vimeo and youtube from famous artists not only doing their demos but also explaining and offering tips. i've even learnt so much as i pointed out from reading here on this site. and then finding by accident clayart threads. 
  17. Like
    preeta got a reaction from GiselleNo5 in Youtube Video Potters   
    stephen i wish the answer was easy.
     
    i am a community college student, have taken classes with a professional potter/retired professor and an avid youtube watcher. 
     
    i have found you need your hands in many pies.
     
    for instance if you watch hsen cheun lin he rarely trims the rim of his pots. he is a pro. as a beginner i had to trim mine all the time to be in control of my pot. i watch a lot of people throwing. there is no one who gives ALL the info. i learnt coning from one person who mentioned it because he was throwing tall. watching potters from india and pakistan and nepal i learnt how you can use the trapped air to help you with your hand built form.
     
    i've had 3 professors teach me clay. i will be adding a couple more in the coming years. if i am lucky i can add another one. because i have found i have learnt different things from the different profs.
     
    of course even that is not enough because i am here asking questions.
     
    i mean little things make such a huge difference. for example - on another thread someone talked about opening up the cylinder wider than necessary to help with the bottom thickness. huge difference. the prof. potter and ex prof. put her hand on top of mine and we pushed in for a bowl to get me to understand how much pressure one needs to really use all the clay.
     
    to me i think a basic book is important. rather than just youtube. hands in clay. or a beginning how to pottery book. goes over some basic info right from teh beginning that you would otherwise spend weeks trying to figure out. things like how much pressure, where your hands should be while centering, where you should pull up and why. esp. if all you have is youtube. 
     
    however here i am talking about wheel throwing. even for handbuilding though - there are good videos out there. i've learnt a lot of tips from the CAD videos too. i've watched NCECA demos and other demos too. 
     
    some videos have great explanations that help.
     
    so far i have not run into any 'bad' pottery videos. or misinformed videos. first what i do is check and see who the person is and how many videos they have uploaded. 
     
    i've watched goldmark videos on potters. i've watched different cultural potters and noticed how their ways were different. i have been lucky to find good demos on vimeo and youtube from famous artists not only doing their demos but also explaining and offering tips. i've even learnt so much as i pointed out from reading here on this site. and then finding by accident clayart threads. 
  18. Like
    preeta got a reaction from D.M.Ernst in Youtube Video Potters   
    stephen i wish the answer was easy.
     
    i am a community college student, have taken classes with a professional potter/retired professor and an avid youtube watcher. 
     
    i have found you need your hands in many pies.
     
    for instance if you watch hsen cheun lin he rarely trims the rim of his pots. he is a pro. as a beginner i had to trim mine all the time to be in control of my pot. i watch a lot of people throwing. there is no one who gives ALL the info. i learnt coning from one person who mentioned it because he was throwing tall. watching potters from india and pakistan and nepal i learnt how you can use the trapped air to help you with your hand built form.
     
    i've had 3 professors teach me clay. i will be adding a couple more in the coming years. if i am lucky i can add another one. because i have found i have learnt different things from the different profs.
     
    of course even that is not enough because i am here asking questions.
     
    i mean little things make such a huge difference. for example - on another thread someone talked about opening up the cylinder wider than necessary to help with the bottom thickness. huge difference. the prof. potter and ex prof. put her hand on top of mine and we pushed in for a bowl to get me to understand how much pressure one needs to really use all the clay.
     
    to me i think a basic book is important. rather than just youtube. hands in clay. or a beginning how to pottery book. goes over some basic info right from teh beginning that you would otherwise spend weeks trying to figure out. things like how much pressure, where your hands should be while centering, where you should pull up and why. esp. if all you have is youtube. 
     
    however here i am talking about wheel throwing. even for handbuilding though - there are good videos out there. i've learnt a lot of tips from the CAD videos too. i've watched NCECA demos and other demos too. 
     
    some videos have great explanations that help.
     
    so far i have not run into any 'bad' pottery videos. or misinformed videos. first what i do is check and see who the person is and how many videos they have uploaded. 
     
    i've watched goldmark videos on potters. i've watched different cultural potters and noticed how their ways were different. i have been lucky to find good demos on vimeo and youtube from famous artists not only doing their demos but also explaining and offering tips. i've even learnt so much as i pointed out from reading here on this site. and then finding by accident clayart threads. 
  19. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Stephen in Youtube Video Potters   
    here are some videos that have helped me apart from the ones already mentioned. robin hoppers dvd sets were my first learning tools.
     
    dan dermer for bowls. we were taught how to bring up bowls. but that it needed so much work inside i had no idea. i learnt perfect bowls from watching this video. 

     
    ingleton pottery videos is another source esp. for vase shapes. in some of this videos he admits his wheel does not slow down beyond a certain speed so he has a hard time throwing wider forms like a moon jar. i think he even showed a video of a failed moon jar. i think the son does not have fingers on one hand and he still throws well too. 
     
    tall cylinders from this guy 
     
    matt horne pottery
     
    liz lotz demos
  20. Like
    preeta reacted to Dick White in How To Paint On A Vase   
    Is there any reason to think this is not majolica?
  21. Like
    preeta reacted to Pres in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    Squeeze really hard in the beginning of the first pull to get a good roll to start to move up, then let up and let the rest happen. The base of the pot is pretty stable early in the throw, if you squeeze with your left, thumb at the bottom, and press in on the donut to control its motion going up and inward, the clay will want to rise on itself.  Squeezing harder than you would normally in the very first pull at the very beginning will move a lot of excess out of the base early. This moves it into the walls of the pot to be thinned later.
     
     
    best,
    Pres
  22. Like
    preeta reacted to Pugaboo in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    When I took my classes Wheel consisted of basically one session watching the teacher at the wheel and then getting on it and trying myself. Not much instruction, I had no idea about so much and have just been figuring it out myself with help from here, videos, books, etc.
     
    First thing I discovered was I couldn't center for the life of me until I closed my eyes. As soon as I did this the clay TOLD ME what it needed. I find closing my eyes to center the clay also centers me. Puts me in the right frame of mind and more connected to the clay. I tell my students now to listen to their clay it's telling them what it needs. It's funny when they close their eyes and try centering that way for the first time and they go, "OH! I knew exactly what it needed to make it centered!" Such a simple thing yet often overlooked. I only teach basic Wheel as I feel it is my weakest forming method mostly because of back issues. But I try and give them a good foundation to build on as they practice on their own.
     
    T
  23. Like
    preeta reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    Most of us have a natural tendency to pull out hands toward our eyes in a straight line.  When you are sitting or standing at a wheel, your eyes are not in a straight line with the wall of the clay.  When I finally recognized that I was making straight line flared cylinders, I moved my eyes (nose actually) directly above the wall that I wanted vertical, and was able to overcome the flaring problem.  After a while, I started watching the profile of the pot on the opposite side of the pot - for me my hands are at 3 o'clock, so I watch the profile at 9 o'clock and can now not have to move heat over the pot.   If  my hands are at 6 o'clock I also look at the 9 o'clock profile (wheel is turning anti-clockwise.   The point here is to look where the profile is nearest to its position without any tool or hand touching the clay.  Many clay bodies are somewhat elastic - porcelain and smooth stoneware especially - and the profile at the position of the hands making the clay change position is not at the equilibrium position. 
     
    LT. 
  24. Like
    preeta reacted to MatthewV in Poor Basic Skill Sets, And Their Consequences   
    Another observation:
    Nearly all beginners think they are messing up or having trouble centering the clay. They are opening it poorly and allowing a wobble to come in. 
     
    And open it much wider. Bigger than the intended bottom size. Heavy bottoms come from not opening it wide enough.
  25. Like
    preeta reacted to glazenerd in Slip Recipes   
    Glaze test results, that I ran yesterday. No slip was used- just glaze experiments.  Cone 6 OX.
     
     
    In this experiment; I was using a chemical boundary to force the glaze run into the area I selected. The brown lines are markers, so I could follow where the glaze went, and where it did not. It was 50% successful.
     
      Experiment was testing variegation in a single glaze application: this is not a layered glaze. A Raspberry Creme, would be a good name for this glaze.  
      Variegation was also being tested on this piece. This is also a single application, with additional glaze loaded on the neck. At the base of the neck, I had applied a chemical barrier to prevent the glaze from running any further than I had marked. The copper broke to the blue side, and likewise cream colors broke through as well (in a single application). The more remarkable result: this glaze has a Si/AL ratio of 9.25; which should have produced a very high gloss. I add 2% of an optically negative element, which resulted in a nearly matte glaze.  
     
    Nerd
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