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preeta

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  1. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Babs in Japanese Pottery, Break from Tradition   
    In a way i feel this change is actually a way of continuing tradition. The tradition of Japanese pottery responding to huge cultural change.  I think its the history of Japan, except this time they did not have to kidnap makers from any other place. 
    I am excited by En iwamura’s work. Ive seen his demos and I’m blown away by how fast he works. His work, similar to Otani’s is actually inspired by the Haniwa’s which is his basis to which he tries to involve cartoons he grew up with or were inspired by. 
    What i really find inspiring is not so much their work changing - that is a given, but its that philosophy - the philosophy of the maker - whether it be sculpture or pottery - is still passed down from generations past. Yes there is money issues, but the makers thoughts feelings, why they are making, how they are making, how they see their world i find its still the same. Ive run into students from China and Korea who are not in the art field just for the money. It was very inspirational to hear these young people talk - because so far i have only come across that amongst the Native American makers here. I’m so glad they are not a Jeff Koons or Damien Hirscht.
    so what one calls modern Japanese ceramics is really japan evolving to catastrophic change much like the tea ceremony that is not all that old - 1300s? Which evolved again in the 1500s. 
    I wonder though are we going to go back to ceramics if we try to cut down our use of plastics and paper?!!!
    and I’ve also seen this whole Sculptor vs potter attitude from all over - from artists in the Middle East, to Europe to the Far East.  In fact people make faces when i say i do mostly pottery and not sculpture. The whole art vs. craft deal.
    anyways i am rambling, just trying to make sense of the thoughts running through my head.
    i wonder are potters now going to treat cobalt blue like blood diamonds? Whole ‘nother Subject.
  2. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Blue Moons in Japanese Pottery, Break from Tradition   
    In a way i feel this change is actually a way of continuing tradition. The tradition of Japanese pottery responding to huge cultural change.  I think its the history of Japan, except this time they did not have to kidnap makers from any other place. 
    I am excited by En iwamura’s work. Ive seen his demos and I’m blown away by how fast he works. His work, similar to Otani’s is actually inspired by the Haniwa’s which is his basis to which he tries to involve cartoons he grew up with or were inspired by. 
    What i really find inspiring is not so much their work changing - that is a given, but its that philosophy - the philosophy of the maker - whether it be sculpture or pottery - is still passed down from generations past. Yes there is money issues, but the makers thoughts feelings, why they are making, how they are making, how they see their world i find its still the same. Ive run into students from China and Korea who are not in the art field just for the money. It was very inspirational to hear these young people talk - because so far i have only come across that amongst the Native American makers here. I’m so glad they are not a Jeff Koons or Damien Hirscht.
    so what one calls modern Japanese ceramics is really japan evolving to catastrophic change much like the tea ceremony that is not all that old - 1300s? Which evolved again in the 1500s. 
    I wonder though are we going to go back to ceramics if we try to cut down our use of plastics and paper?!!!
    and I’ve also seen this whole Sculptor vs potter attitude from all over - from artists in the Middle East, to Europe to the Far East.  In fact people make faces when i say i do mostly pottery and not sculpture. The whole art vs. craft deal.
    anyways i am rambling, just trying to make sense of the thoughts running through my head.
    i wonder are potters now going to treat cobalt blue like blood diamonds? Whole ‘nother Subject.
  3. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Chilly in Fused glass on ^6   
    Ok Doc i hope you dont mind my reply. But i no longer suffer fools.
    Glass and clay dont mix. Period. There are a lot of cutesy ceramic glass coasters and stuff people make. (Can’t stand cutesy inane stuff) Ultimately the glass is going to pop out at some point of time. You know like Corporations who are there to make a few bucks. Not to watch out for what’s good for mankind. Businesses  who are putting clay and glass together dont really care for the longevity or safety of their client. They make sure its good for a while so they wont be sued. 
    There is nothing wrong in experimenting and discovering what happens. The curious mind should be encouraged. 
    When science can discover how to put clay and glass together (a way to never have the glass pieces pop off, whether in a year or 10 years) when there is definite results i will use glass. 
    Having said that i can get the glass look. Unfortunately that’s because i have access to a gas kiln which turns the bottom of my Oribe bowls into bright glass like green (if everything is in order and the kiln gods say yes).  Porcelain (and I’m sure white clay body) and transluscent glazes have a glass like look. By glass like look i mean bright colors and the ability to see through the glaze. Even layers of colors. Which you dont get with UG and clear glaze. 
    Ceramics is complicated enough, without adding glass to the picture. 
     
  4. Like
    preeta reacted to docweathers in Cotton fibers for paper clay   
    I just dug out a quart of  paper clay from the back of my refrigerator.  I made it a couple of years ago with wood fiber and a few drops of chlorine bleach. There is not one black spot in it.  It smells sweet and is perfectly smooth.
  5. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Rae Reich in How to make this texture   
    Off topic
    Since you called yourself a gizmo guy here is a guy just up your alley.
    http://www.barbotic.com/Bar-Shacterman-Gallery.php?gallery=mythology
    Bar finally landed in the US after traveling through many countries. He got his art education in Israel where he worked a lot with metal. All his sculptors are put together. They are not tediously hand crafted. His basic method is extruding and molds. 
    In my opinion his skill is the ability to work with metal and create his own tools. I saw his demo and got a chance to talk to him. What i came away with - was that a major part of his creative process is creating tools. He creates his tools and then extrudes or molds his parts, then makes a series of taking pieces and parts and putting them together. 
    Also how about  Kate Malone. She coil builds her pots but all her embellishment comes out of molds. Huge pots. 
     
  6. Like
    preeta reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Underglaze Bleeding Wanted!   
    @preeta the first set of cups were made by Dawn Candy, who is actually from my neck of the woods. She’s @littlesisterpottery on IG if you want to check her out. Those particular models look like some of her older work.  Her whole process is to draw with a slip trailer and underglazes (I have no idea what brand), and then she layers glazes that run over top. 
    The second set are Sean O’connel’s, and he actually has a video here on CLAYflicks on his decorating process. These cups are part of it. 
  7. Like
    preeta reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Glaze Sludge in Bucket   
    You shouldn’t need to sieve it, though. 
    Its easier to add dissolved Epsom salts to already wet materials. Epsom salts dissolve better in hot water than they do in a cold glaze bucket. 
  8. Like
    preeta reacted to Magnolia Mud Research in Underglaze Bleeding Wanted!   
    I wonder if the apparent 'bleeding' is a technique used at the time the blue colorant was applied to the pieces - that was the way I achieved similar effect on canvas with water color and pastel crayons.  after lots of practice a "light" stroke with the "right" brush would produce the allusion of bleeding.   
    LT
     
  9. Like
    preeta reacted to oldlady in Cracking platters   
    preeta, your post overlapped my slow typing.
    just once i wish someone would say that they took my suggestion and tried it and it worked.    UNLESS YOU ARE ATTACHING A HANDLE OR SOMETHING ELSE slow drying is not necessary.
    what can it hurt to try drying something flat on drywall or something that will absorb water from the bottom as well as having the top air dry?   (you can slide it around to see how much water is coming off the bottom a few hours after putting it down.)
  10. Like
    preeta reacted to Pres in Cracking platters   
    Preeta, years ago, I was throwing some large platters, and they wanted nicely finished foot rings with a shallow curve to the form. This was not possible with out a lot of trimming. so I threw them upside down, on this bat, made the double foot ring with large enough outer ring to support the curve at out edge, then the inner foot ring to support the center. Worked very well. Sometimes the obvious solution to a problem is not the best one.  For a bird bath that was not flat, but evenly round, and with a foot ring to fit the pedestal base, this was the only solution I could believe most efficient, especially since I had the plaster domed bat.
     
    best.
    Pres
  11. Like
    preeta reacted to Min in Cracking platters   
    I find its the evenness of the drying that is super important and not so much the speed of it. Get the thickness even across the base and the walls as best you can. Trim the bottom as soon as you can, don't wait until the rims of the platters are too dry. Flip the platter center portion onto an upholstery foam covered batt so the main part of the platter is supported by the foam and the rim is hanging, don't support them on the rim while trimming. Trim a small support ring towards the center of the bottom when trimming if the platters are large so it has some support while firing and doesn't slump.  Once it's all trimmed then you might try slowing down how fast the rim dries. I take thin plastic and wrap it around the rim, platter is right side up on a batt and I wrap both the under and topsides with plastic and leave the middle of the platter unwrapped. Let the middle dry out then loosen up the plastic on the rim, you're trying to get them both to dry at the same rate but the rims always will want to dry faster. If you make some slab built ones then put  bit of weight in the middle to stop it lifting up, not necessary for wheel thrown ones.
    I used to use a body with sand, it did watersplit if I rewet it too much as it was drying, I'm wondering if this is part of your problem. There isn't much shrinkage from dry greenware to bisque, the main shrinkage with clay is from wet to dry then from bisque to glaze firing (excluding some lowfire). Your shelves look good, if they were my platters I'ld bisque them without sand (or coils) and glaze fire with them.
    The platter on the top shelf in your images had a double stress put on it. The center cup part is going to have added to the thickness of the base where it's attached, plus it didn't have a shelf above it to act as a heat sink. The bigger the platter the more it needs the cooling really controlled. Next time either don't put a platter on the very top shelf or put another shelf above it to help hold the heat as the kiln is cooling. It wouldn't hurt to put some mass around the edges of the platters on the other shelves. Just lay some triangular or square extra kiln posts around the edges of the platters. A couple times a year I do a refire of pots that had glaze issues, including lazy susan's and pots like my avatar, both are prone to cracking on refiring so I use a super cautious firing schedule. Even though this schedule is for my refiring it should be fine for bisque to glaze firing. Heating up: start off with whatever preheating/candling you normally use then I go at 350 an hour to 380 with 0 hold. Then slow it down to 50 an hour to 480 with 0 hold. Then 400 an hour to 1000, 0 hold, 50 hour to 1100 0 hold, 375 an hour to whatever your cone 6 is plus your usual hold if you do one. Cooling down: 9999 to 1100, 0 hold. 50 an hour to 1000 with 0 hold. Kiln off and plugs not removed until 200F. (If you do a slow cool down or a drop and hold schedule then add those ramps in)
  12. Like
    preeta reacted to Pres in Cracking platters   
    Doc
    I just fired a bird bath top for a friend that let his freeze. I made mine by throwing upside down on a plaster domed bat with a 2 1/2" rise. Centered ball on top, flattened down around the edges. the center flange to hold the top on the base was thrown into the bottom from same piece, after drying to leather hard, added a thrown ring to top to deepen water area. This 22" platter was fired upside down in bisque, and upside down in glaze firing, leaving the rim unglazed. I was afraid it would collapse around the collar with such a cantilever. Thrown to glaze fire time was 1 1/2 weeks!
     
    Buddy was very pleased with the replacement.
    I believe as others that it is your glaze firing expansion/contraction causing the problem, not your making skills!
     
    best,
    Pres
  13. Like
    preeta reacted to Min in Cracking platters   
    @docweathers, when I expand your photos and look at the cracks it looks to me like the glaze edges are rounded over the cracks. The left side of the crack on the second platter and the crack on the green platter both look like the glaze has rounded/smoothed off over the crack which means the cracks didn't happen on the cool down but they were there as the glaze was melting, perhaps from the bisque firing. Sharp edges on cracks with no glaze softening the fracture means the cracking happened on the cool down. 
  14. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Hulk in Oxides   
    In cases where you cant see the color food coloring is your friend. 
  15. Like
    preeta got a reaction from EKasse in Add more stain to Slip already prepared???   
    The secret that i discovered by accident is if you just wet your bisqueware (after you slip it during green ware state) you will see a brighter color close to how it appears under clear glaze but not a 100%
  16. Like
    preeta got a reaction from MamaJenXO in Underglaze Bleeding Wanted!   
    i haven’t done this in a while but if i remember right the black mostly bled and i think a dark almost black blue bled.
    does the clear move? i achieved the bleeding by applying the underglaze and immediately applying the clear glaze. lots of it - but not too much to cause the cloudiness.
    thin lines have not bled that much. thicker lines with 3 or 4 coates of ug has bled. 
    if i want the design to move i’ve applied glaze and then applied underglaze (though mostly cobalt) on top of the glaze. it does not bleed. it just shifts. 
    also if i remember right, my walls bled, not the floors of the pots. 
    good luck!!!
  17. Like
    preeta reacted to neilestrick in Susan Ross Pottery: advice on clay body changes   
    The limestone is from the raw materials, and Standard has no control over that. Even if they fire a small test piece, but there's no guarantee it will show up in it. And there's no guarantee that you won't have the problem with another brand, especially since many use the same raw materials. Ask Standard to replace it- they will- and it will bring the problem to their attention, so they can deal with it. 2 bad batches over 20 years isn't that bad.
  18. Like
    preeta reacted to Babs in Monotyping ink or technique?   
    Was a great post on brush making a while back..
  19. Like
    preeta got a reaction from liambesaw in Monotyping ink or technique?   
    The finest line i have ever achieved  is with an exacto knife. From a potters video online.  It sorta is the Mishima technique but quicker.
    Brush on wax resist. Wait for it to dry well. Then draw your lines with the exacto brush. Then brush on underglaze and wipe off. Super easy and quick (if you don’t count the waiting time). One time i spent hours doing Mishima with different colored slip. Swore never again till I learnt to play with wax resist. 
    however drawing with an exacto knife is not easy because of its flatness. It still does a finer line that a sharp needle.
    I prefer layering. I prefer thick and thin line. I prefer drawing with a brush though. Though i have yet to find a good brush without spending oodles of dollars. Am thinking of making some from my friend’’s dog. It is so hard to find a sumi brush that has a point. 
  20. Like
    preeta got a reaction from Benzine in Japanese Pottery, Break from Tradition   
    In a way i feel this change is actually a way of continuing tradition. The tradition of Japanese pottery responding to huge cultural change.  I think its the history of Japan, except this time they did not have to kidnap makers from any other place. 
    I am excited by En iwamura’s work. Ive seen his demos and I’m blown away by how fast he works. His work, similar to Otani’s is actually inspired by the Haniwa’s which is his basis to which he tries to involve cartoons he grew up with or were inspired by. 
    What i really find inspiring is not so much their work changing - that is a given, but its that philosophy - the philosophy of the maker - whether it be sculpture or pottery - is still passed down from generations past. Yes there is money issues, but the makers thoughts feelings, why they are making, how they are making, how they see their world i find its still the same. Ive run into students from China and Korea who are not in the art field just for the money. It was very inspirational to hear these young people talk - because so far i have only come across that amongst the Native American makers here. I’m so glad they are not a Jeff Koons or Damien Hirscht.
    so what one calls modern Japanese ceramics is really japan evolving to catastrophic change much like the tea ceremony that is not all that old - 1300s? Which evolved again in the 1500s. 
    I wonder though are we going to go back to ceramics if we try to cut down our use of plastics and paper?!!!
    and I’ve also seen this whole Sculptor vs potter attitude from all over - from artists in the Middle East, to Europe to the Far East.  In fact people make faces when i say i do mostly pottery and not sculpture. The whole art vs. craft deal.
    anyways i am rambling, just trying to make sense of the thoughts running through my head.
    i wonder are potters now going to treat cobalt blue like blood diamonds? Whole ‘nother Subject.
  21. Like
    preeta reacted to oldlady in Pregnancy And Working In The Studio?   
    diesel, i loved what you inadvertently said about kids followed by damp boxes and cabinets.  remember mark twain's comment about putting a 12 year old into a barrel and not letting it out until it was 21?
  22. Like
    preeta reacted to JeffK in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    "I have no special talent. I am only passionately curious."
                                                                                 - Albert Einstein
    So goes the road I'm on...   - Jeff
  23. Like
    preeta got a reaction from lgusten in How do you feel about being called talented?   
    David the birth of my daughter taught me not to take those comments to heart. I did not really appreciate my mom till i became a mother myself. i did of course appreciate her but not to the level i do now.  which i feel sad about. 
    the context does matter a lot.
    i grew up in india where i accept the compliment with a smile because talent usually means - you put in all the hard work and look how nice it looks. whereas i put in all that work and mine comes out looking like nothing. these are people who have done art and know what it means to persevere. 
    here i just feel sad. because i feel people are missing out on so much (lack of any art education/appreciation). or the big factor. the fear thing. perfectionism.  not being able to overcome the fear of underpar work. the nostalgia of wanting to create but being afraid to because of the horribleness that comes forth  - in their estimate.
    the comment that makes me really sad is 'i can't sing because i haven't been taught to'. anyone can sing. instead of   singing to their kids i see parents play their recorded music because they are not good. who cares. just sing.  why read story books at night all the time? tell stories. stories of your childhood, your ancestors. 
    so for a lot of people i feel its also nostalgia. i really feel underneath they would like to create but feel paralyzed by their inner critique.
    yet for me the problem is how to learn what a 'good' pot is. i can after 10 tries make a perfect technical pot - but what makes a pot a strong pot. so in their books i might be 'talented' but in my own books i am trying to figure out what kind of a pot am i?
  24. Like
    preeta reacted to oldlady in Anyone know what these tiles are for?   
    maybe roof tiles for a planned dollhouse?   my imagination is working overtime here.
  25. Like
    preeta reacted to Callie Beller Diesel in Is there any way to "whiten" red clay?   
    If you mix the red and white clays together, it will not stop the iron in the red clay from coming through your glazes. If you mix kaolin to your red clay it won’t do anything to the colour.
    As a fellow red clay user, your best options are indeed to either add a layer of white slip/engobe, or to embrace the way the colour of the clay comes through the glazes. It can create some beautiful effects.
    You describe pieces popping off when you applied kaolin slip to your piece, and that the places where it stayed it was yellowish. Did you apply the slip to bisque and then glaze over top, or did you apply the slip to the piece while it was leather hard? With many slip recipes, or even just straight kaolin, when you apply it will affect how well it sticks to the piece. Leather hard is the best stage usually. 
    The yellowish colour of the slip after firing could be that the layer of slip was too thin and the iron from the red clay was coming through that too. It could be a kaolin that naturally contains things like iron or titanium that will make things less white. Do you know what kind of kaolin it is? What does it say on the bag it comes in?
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