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TortoiseAvenger

Amorphous Silica Vs Just "silica" In Glaze?

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Silica comes in different fineness or mesh. 200, 325, 400 mesh. most potters use either 200 or 325.

 I was given some Amorphous Silica once but did not notice any difference, though others say it will melt earlier and change the look of a glaze.

Amorphous Silica I believe cost more than 200 mesh. try some and see what you think.

Wyndham

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You might want to check if your supplier lists flint or quartz. I've never bought

"silica" in the UK other than as flint or quartz.

 

Quoting from Digitalfire http://digitalfire.com/4sight/material/flint_316.html

The terms flint, quartz and silica have come to be used interchangeably in

ceramics and you will see them all employed in recipes

 

Regards, Peter

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my vote is for silica 325 because i have seen it specified in some of my favorite glaze recipes.

 

i thought amorphous simply means that if not stored tightly in a sealed container it will absorb moisture from humidity in the air.  how that would affect anything is ?????

 

edited at 11:54 pm.

duh!!!!!!!!!!!!  i was thinking of the word anhydrous.  i will now go stand in the corner.

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In my world, a water absorbing substance is called hygroscopic. It matters when weighing things out because the more water something absorbs, the heavier it becomes. Thus, 100 g of a hygroscopic substance might only be 95 g of that substance, if the other 5 is water.

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Guest JBaymore

Amorphous silica is a very fine particle size.  Chemically.... same source of SiO2.  Because of the intimacy of the mix with smaller particles in a glaze coating, it CAN cause a differenece in the melting of a recipe calling for larger mesh sizes.  Same way ball milling a glaze can change how it melts.

 

It is WAY more hazardous to weigh out dry... becasue of the particle size and dusting.

 

best,

 

.......................john

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