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Latex Resist


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#1 Idaho Potter

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 07:19 PM

I know this has been discussed many times before, but combing through the archives has not given me the info I want.  I've used it as a general search, and got nothing.  Went to members pages--who I thought had been in on the discussions--and there's just too many items to plow through.  My eyes have given up and my nether regions are numb.  Hopefully some of your memories are better than mine.

 

The latex I've tried before is really thin (even with additional coats) and is difficult to remove.  Is there any specific brand that may go on thicker, thus being easier to remove, than what I've used?  I've even considered rubber cement, but it is really too gloppy for my needs.  I have around thirty raku bowls/vases where I want the rims to be free of glaze so as to get a deep black color.  Tried using masking/painter's tape, but it was taking me an hour per pot to make sure everything was covered, and I maintained a sharp demarcation line.  Wax resist burns out, but causes the clay to be a dark gray rather than black after the post-firing reduction.

 

Any and all suggestions would be greatly welcomed.

 

This old lady thanks you in advance,

 

Shirley



#2 Benzine

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 09:10 PM

Shirley,

 

I've used a couple different types.  One, worked well for a while, but slowly dried in the bottle, and I had to throw it.  The latex I currently use, has worked well thus far.  I can't remember the manufacturer, I'll look tomorrow, when I get to my classroom.

 

I would think rubber cement would work, but I would think it would run more, than latex resist.


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#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:15 PM

I find it comes off easiest if done soon after it is applied. if it dries, use a damp sponge to wet it and it will come off.
I use Amaco latex. I apply it thinned down for brush ability.

Marcia

#4 Mark C.

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:35 PM

I use Laguna clay latex

no issues

Mark


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#5 Diane Puckett

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:54 AM

I have found the best way to remove it is a dental scaling tool. I use it to pierce and grab a tiny bit of the latex, and them just pull off the rest. This works even with the very thin latex.
Diane Puckett
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#6 PeterH

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:28 AM

>The latex I've tried before is really thin (even with additional coats) and is difficult to remove.

 

Copydex adhesive is latex, is pretty thick out of the tube/container, and it peels well for me.

Posters on other threads have said that you can dilute it with water as required.

 

Regards, Peter

 

If used thickly, it peels very successfully from adjacent 2-part naked raku. Keeping the edge of

the glaze layer well away from the pot.



#7 Idaho Potter

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:27 PM

Thanks to everyone who responded.  

 

Peter, are you on the other side of the "pond"?  I like the idea of a water-based latex, but Copydex doesn't seem to be readily available here in the U.S.  Finally found some at Amazon (why was I surprised?) but it's quite spendy and I had to find an equivalency chart to find out how much 125 ML is in ounces (4.667).  No, I don't have a clue when it comes to the metric system.

 

Mark, the stuff I've used in the past was Laguna.  Using a dental pick (Diana) it was still difficult to remove as it would easily tear.  Perhaps I left it on too long, so I'll try moistening it (Marcia) before peeling it off the pots.

 

Benzine, the Laguna went semi-solid on me, but it was old.  

 

I was just hoping to find thicker and without ammonia--which literally takes my breath away.  Rubber cement is also not good for inhaling.  I'll hit some more websites tonight and will probably end up with Laguna again.

 

Once again, thanks to all of you for your help.

 

Shirley



#8 Benzine

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:41 PM

Shirley,

 

Yeah, all that I've ever used smelled to high heaven.  The odor that comes off of it, is like a litter box, that hasn't been cleaned in a week, that's sitting in the middle of an ammonia factory.

 

Also, when I'm try to remove the resist, I just rub across it, like when removing excess rubber cement.  That usually does the trick.


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#9 PeterH

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 06:51 PM

>Peter, are you on the other side of the "pond"?

 

Guilty as charged. Don't know the name of a US equivalent to Copydex.



#10 Idaho Potter

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 08:43 PM

More digging and all the ceramic suppliers online have the ammonia scented latex.  All that I found say to remove ASAP or removal becomes a problem.  I even delved into my past life as a painter, and researched Frisket type masking.  Reviews and info lean towards watercolors and paper--not ceramic.

 

So, Peter, what's the waiting time on Copydex?  If it gives me more time (I'd like to be able to mask 10 - 12 pots, then spray glaze on ALL of them before having to remove the latex) it would be worth the extra expense.

 

Shirley



#11 Benzine

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 09:02 PM

Shirley,

I tried using a watercolor maskoid as a resist. Works great, but you burn through the tiny jars fast, compared to the large jar of latex resist. I don't recommend it.
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#12 Biglou13

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 09:40 PM

Will this product work

http://www.usplastic...CFa_m7Aodmi8AuA

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#13 Mark C.

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:04 PM

I just looked at what I use its laguna ammonia base latex-I do not thin it at all just brush it on bisque ware or most often over a glaze I want to protect-then as soon as its dry (very soon) I dip the pot and then with a needle tool grip and peel the latex-seems to work fine. I do not let it sit long.

This is how I do my copper red brush work in bowls then the rest of bowl is black glaze. It time consuming but this latex works well for this.

Mark


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#14 Benzine

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 10:23 PM

I wonder there is an issue with resists and similar adhesives, if they sit too long? It's like how some masking tape sticks badly, if you leave it a while. I have also noticed, that the watercolor maskoid discolors the paper, if left a while. So perhaps, if you don't remove the latex resist, before a certain point, it is more difficult to remove.
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#15 timbo_heff

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 01:07 PM

How about this stuff from ceramic shop:?

I heard it's good:

http://www.thecerami...ff-Resist,-8oz/



#16 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 01:23 PM

I had a hard time with the stuff from the ceramics shop. I went back to latex.
Marcia

#17 PeterH

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 05:59 PM

>So, Peter, what's the waiting time on Copydex?  If it gives me more time (I'd like to be able to mask 10 - 12 pots, then spray glaze on ALL of them before having to remove the latex) it would be worth the extra expense.

 

I cannot really comment on applying Copydex thinly. I've only used it for "wavy" black lines on raku, done at raku parties.

Squeezed as a 2-3mm wide fluid "toothpaste" through a hole drilled in the cap. Probably the longest I've left it was 24hrs.

I have one glued-up that missed glazing at my last raku party, and I hadn’t anticipated there would be any problems peeling

it when the time comes.Time will tell of course.

You might want to look at: http://tinyurl.com/nebp4fw for a fuller description of Copydex as a resist .

 

You might also consider experimenting with the resists used for water erosion. These are of course usually just burnt out,

and I have no idea if they would give you a better black region that wax resist. They would probably be easier on the brush

than latex, and more stable in the container. Thinking of shellac and acrylic medium; e.g. see http://tinyurl.com/9lwoop6

 

Regards, Peter

 

PS Found this at http://tinyurl.com/q5pkbjz

In the U.S. the equivalent to CopyDex appears to be TearMender.  I found TearMender a few years back while trying to find a U.S. company that carried CopyDex. 

I began my search because I was annoyed by the $7 price for a 20ml tube of Butterfly glue.  CopyDex and TearMender are to water based table tennis glues as

rubber cement was to table tennis glues.

 

 



#18 Benzine

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 06:01 PM

How about this stuff from ceramic shop:?

I heard it's good:

http://www.thecerami...ff-Resist,-8oz/

 

 

To me, removable wax resist is up there, with water soluble oil paints, in terms of the amount of witchcraft used, to create them.  

 

Also, I looked in my classroom, I use Amaco's latex resist.


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#19 Idaho Potter

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 06:28 PM

Wow!  Lots of good info.  Went to my pottery supply shop and found Laguna now has a water based latex resist that is used by students taking their classes.   Talking with the instructor, found that the pots are frequently left for a week or more between application and removal of the latex.  That's plenty of time for me.  I'll post the outcome after glazing the pots.

 

Thanks for the info on the peel off wax resist.  I'll give it a try on some pots that I don't have so much time invested in decoration, to see if it does leave some wax residue in the clay.  I really like the idea of peeling it off, and the little video makes it look simple.

 

Once again,  Thanks to all of you,

 

Shirley






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