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#41 Babs

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 04:56 PM

doesn't look like any of the forum made it into those stats, Yet!



#42 flowerdry

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 08:49 PM

"Having worked with rabies, I would not recommend handling any dead animal without gloves. (Yes, there are other, more stable viruses, but see here re rabies: http://www.dec.ny.go...als/32131.html)"

 

This link doesn't work...says the page doesn't exist anymore.  So now I'm curious...was there a story there?

 


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#43 Babs

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Posted 04 March 2014 - 10:42 PM

 

"Having worked with rabies, I would not recommend handling any dead animal without gloves. (Yes, there are other, more stable viruses, but see here re rabies: http://www.dec.ny.go...als/32131.html)"

 

This link doesn't work...says the page doesn't exist anymore.  So now I'm curious...was there a story there?

 

 

 

 

Might have a virus :o



#44 ChenowethArts

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 07:32 AM

During certain season of the year, a lot of white-tailed dear meet their fate along the highways where I live.  I have carried hand pruners, gloves and ziplock bags in the car for over a year now, but haven't been able to get past the idea of cutting something off the business end of a dead dear on the side of the road. Heck, I still tear-up watching Bambi...isn't there a wicked dear movie that can get me beyond this?? :)
 
Anyway, I have looked through the YouTube videos on making brushes...and although this one goes way beyond my particular needs, it is interesting to see elaborate processes for making brushes: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=C5j3RW8PF8M Enjoy...it is just over 4 minutes long.

 

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#45 schmism

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 01:12 PM

the important question is to ask is HOW is rabies spread.  ie can you get it from "just touching an infected animal"  the short answer is no.

 

Transmission of rabies virus usually begins when infected saliva of a host is passed to an uninfected animal. The most common mode of rabies virus transmission is through the bite and virus-containing saliva of an infected host.

 

http://www.cdc.gov/r...s/transmission/

 

so yes those that catch rabies are likely from being bit by a live wild animals.

 

Most people like to wear gloves when touching dead animals because for most people, dead animals have a tenancy to peg the "gross meter".    

 

As a guy who lives on a farm,  its something you get used to.   The chicken doesn't make it to the table on its own if you know what I mean.

 

as to the original topic  i found this vid to be of interest

 

 

for those of you wondering why the deer tail is bright green.   or for those of you not wanting to harvest dead road kill for the tails.   

 

FYI  they use dear tail in fly tying  (as in fly fishing)  so you can purchase dear tail for said purpose 

 

http://www.amazon.co...s=dear bucktail

 

cabelas also carries a whole fur section of there website for fly tying.  (pssstttt you dont have to tell them your making brushes out of it  ;) )

 

http://www.cabelas.c...e.cmd?N=1100436



#46 Mark C.

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 01:23 PM

I use dried bamboo not wet green bamboo as it splits more easily.

I also glue a Nylon loop on end of brush to hang them from.

These few extra details will make a brush last for decades if taken care of.

Mark


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#47 JBaymore

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 02:11 PM

Re:  dangers of roadkill.......... Common sense and Clorox are your friends.  If you think you need more than Clorox....... give it a pass.

 

best,

 

...................john

 

PS:  I use a lot of horse mane and tail hair.  Sometime I get friends that hunt to save me deer tails.  I have a Japanese garden... so have bamboo growing in it for handles.


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#48 Nancy S.

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:43 PM

doesn't look like any of the forum made it into those stats, Yet!

 

Well, that is the "wild animal" category....I'd count potters in the "domestic group." :lol:



#49 TJR

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 03:49 PM

What about human hair? I have a lovely head of hair that could be made into many brushes  ^_^ It is a little too curly though.

O.K. Now you are just fishing for a complement.When I look at people, I never look at them with a view to make a brush.

I just buy mine-the brushes, that is.

TJR [the hairy potter].



#50 Babs

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Posted 05 March 2014 - 11:23 PM

 

What about human hair? I have a lovely head of hair that could be made into many brushes  ^_^ It is a little too curly though.

O.K. Now you are just fishing for a complement.When I look at people, I never look at them with a view to make a brush.

I just buy mine-the brushes, that is.

TJR [the hairy potter].

 

TJR if ever you get frozen into your studio again you could start a new trade!!



#51 PeterH

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 06:23 AM

Some very nicely detailed pix of "relief lines" and "relief dots" on Greek pottery, and some research on  how they

were made. [With a one-hair brush.]

 

http://culturalherit...nmanuscript.pdf

 

Regards, Peter

 



#52 ChenowethArts

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 07:43 AM

I just did a quick search for 'deer tail' and 'squirrel tail' at ebay.com...not totally surprising that there are multiple listings.  Sure, that increases the cost of the brush, but it looks like the risk of insects/disease is reduced by someone else treating/cleaning the items.


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#53 bciskepottery

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 07:52 AM

I bought deer tails on-line from a person who sold tails, pelts, antlers, etc. All were treated. You only need a couple to make a good supply of brushes. Prices were rather cheap, too.

When buying, be aware of when the tail or piece of pelt was harvested. There is a difference in hair between seasons, especially winter. In winter, animals hair thickens to protect them from cold. That "belly hair" is not usually good for brushes. You'll need to remove any fuzzy hair with a fine comb, dog/cat tick comb, or similar tool. Make friends with the local riding stable, they can provide you with horse hair (mane and tail) that is good for brushes, as well as horse hair firings.

#54 Bob Coyle

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Posted 06 March 2014 - 11:48 AM

 

What about human hair? I have a lovely head of hair that could be made into many brushes   It is a little too curly though.

 

I Tried making a brush out of my own hair after a hair cut... Didn't work worth a darn. The slightest curl messes things up and the hair is too thick and has not enough taper. Oriental hair has been used a lot but it is straight and still not as good as tail hair from animals. Here in the South West  natural fibers from cactus plants were used. Has anyone tried that?



#55 Pres

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Posted 09 March 2014 - 09:32 PM

Mark Shapiro was using a stiff, very course synthetic almost broom like red brush to apply slip. It gave him a streaked line that was very pleasing in his salt firings.


Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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