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Saggar Fire In Electric Kiln After Vitrification

Saggar cone 5

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#1 mandersart

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 12:30 PM

Here's my question:  Is it possible or recommended to aluminum wrap saggar fire in an electric kiln ware that has been partially glaze fired to cone 5 or 6?  Will the vitrified clay accept the carbon from the smoke?  My goal is to have the inside of my ware glazed but have exterior raw and charred looking.  Any other suggestions are extremely welcome.  Thank you!

 

 



#2 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 04:32 PM

I have not seen this done in an electric kiln. I did have a student do a saggar firing in a barrel with a fire and sawdust on cone 6 fired work. It did leave a flashed marking, but not charred.

#3 PeterH

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 04:45 PM

I believe that "smoke effects" and a "vitrified body" are fundamentally incompatible. AFAIK you cannot successfully smoke a vitrified body,

or vitrify a smoked one [and retain the smoked effect].

 

I won't say its totally impossible -- as you can have weak "smoke effects" and a partially "vitrified body" -- but I doubt that it would be worthwhile.

 

My goal is to have the inside of my ware glazed but have exterior raw and charred looking.

 

Easy enough to do with a non-vitrified body, but it won't be safely watertight.

- One-shot - Raku with post-firing smoking/reduction.

- Two-shot - Glaze fire normally, then lower-fired smoking.

   Which is what Tim Andrews does with some of his work, in his case to produce a refined crackle. http://tinyurl.com/p85klch

 

If you want a vitrified body, I suspect that you may be limited to things like textured surfaces and oxide washes for the "raw and charred" effect.

 

Regards, Peter



#4 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 07:08 PM

I agree with Peter that you need an unvitirified body to get smoke absorption into the work.Russel Fouts does foil saggar firing in an electric kiln. He fires terra cotta with terra sig.
http://users.skynet.be/russel.fouts/

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#5 Evelyne Schoenmann

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 08:59 AM

I experimented with Raku glaze on the inside and oxides and smoke on the outside of a pot in drum and pit fires (without saggars). Only on one occasion did I get the fire(s) so hot, that the raku glaze vitrified and adhered to the pot (and not only for 1 hour). I would try it in a saggar and in the el. kiln if I were you, mandersart. Maybe not the foil saggar (Marcia always warns people that in an el. kiln you can't monitor the foil melting, and she's right!). Try it in a clay saggar with raku glaze on the inside of your pot and combustibles between saggar wall and your pot walls. If necessary smoke the pot when the saggar firing didn't leave enough smoke. I hope it comes out well.

 

Evelyne

 

 

PS: just looked at the red pot of Tim Andrews. Boy, how beautiful!!


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#6 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 07:35 PM

I am just beginning to read about saggar firing.  Is it possible to sagar fire a bisque pot, then go back with a clear glaze on the interior of the pot in the electric kiln for a third firing or will it burn away the saggar results? Does anyone know if there is a good resource I could read about pit firing foil saggar results? 


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)

#7 bciskepottery

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 08:16 PM

You will burn off the effects of the saggar in the glaze firing. Russell Fouts (cited above) has written articles that would be helpful. There may be articles in the CAD archive.

#8 PeterH

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 08:18 PM

Rebekah,

 

 Is it possible to saggar fire a bisque pot, then go back with a clear glaze on the interior of the pot in the electric kiln for a third firing

 

You might do better putting an e/w glaze on the inside of the pot and firing it normally, then doing the saggar firing last. Obviously

if you do this the glaze firing cannot mature the pot beyond the stage the saggar firing requires, and there is a danger that the

glaze will crackle and/or be "contaminated" during the saggar firing.

 

Regards, Peter



#9 Rebekah Krieger

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:31 PM

Thank you-  This process seems very interesting. I have literally only read a few passages in pottery books about this.  I am very curious about trying it some day.  


Learning On my Kick wheel with my vintage Paragon (from the late 1960's)





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