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Two Kilns, One Outlet, Different Amps.

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My new kiln requires a 50 amp breaker, old kiln used a 40 amp.  The wiring itself is good for up to 60 amp.  If I put in a 50 amp breaker, plug in my old kiln, is it possible it will over load electrically and have a melt down.  Obviously I am illiterate when it comes to electrical work.  I don't really want to spend another $300 paying an electrician to run another outlet and put in yet another breaker.  Help??

 

 

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If your wire run is number 6 wire or larger good for 60 amps then all you need is a new 50 amp breaker.

Just remember if you hook up your older 40 amp to this replace 50 amp breaker again to 40 amps.You may need an different outlet as well for the kiln unless its hard wired into the box?

Have someone with electrical experiance do all this for you -this stuff can kill you .

Mark

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There's a few different solutions, one of which is to use a 50 amp main that would then feed a 40 amp secondary. You would use the main for new kiln and the secondary for the old (not at the same time of course). I'm a HVAC technician, and we a similar setup for motor test stations. The important thing is to have the proper protection available for each application.

 

Certainly check with a local electrician to see what is allowed in your area, but there should be some fairly simple solutions available.

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My new kiln requires a 50 amp breaker, old kiln used a 40 amp.  The wiring itself is good for up to 60 amp.  If I put in a 50 amp breaker, plug in my old kiln, is it possible it will over load electrically and have a melt down.  Obviously I am illiterate when it comes to electrical work.  I don't really want to spend another $300 paying an electrician to run another outlet and put in yet another breaker.  Help??

My brother-in-law used to work at a home improvement center. Several years ago he said that in the electrical department, your question was the most frequent one that he heard.

 

It is important that you find out the type and gauge of wire that runs between the breaker box and the wall outlet before installing a higher amperage receptacle. I suggest that you have an electrician check the wiring and install the receptacle for you. Consult the kiln manufacturer's specs; they often include the recommended wire gauge, which varies depending on the distance between the breaker box and receptacle.

 

Sincerely,

 

Arnold Howard

Paragon Industries, L.P., Mesquite, Texas USA

ahoward@paragonweb.com / www.paragonweb.com

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According to the National Electrical Code, continuous heating appliances such as kilns should be wired to a breaker that is 125% of the actual amperage draw of the appliance. This is why 48 amp kilns run on 60 amp breakers, and 24 amp kilns run on 30 amp breakers. The code also states that for overload protection, the breaker should not be more than 150% of the actual draw.

 

Your old kiln that is supposed to be hooked up to a 40 amp breaker had a draw of no more than 32 amps. So 32 amps at 150% puts it at 48 amps max for the breaker size. So technically you should not go to a 50 amp breaker. As someone suggested above, you'd be better off putting in a secondary box, coming off the 50 amp box, that has the appropriate 40 amp breaker.

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Man, this so not what I wantted to hear.  I'm going to see what it will cost to just replace the breaker for now and use the new kiln.  Its that or wait 6 mons to use the new kiln.  I just hate to use new elements to do bisque when I have the old kiln sitting there doing nothing.

 

Thanks for all the info.  You guy are great.

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Niel and Norm,  thanks for the info.  I feel better about the whole situation now.  I have a guy that does flooring for a living and when he has free time will do just about any handyman job I have, just won't touch anything electrical.  So I have to call a 'real' electrician in.  I do feel OK switching out the breaker though,  Just got to remember to turn off the main breaker to the power and let it chill for a bit.  I always check the wires with a voltage regulator first and make sure the thing is dead.  I got shocked once by a bad light switch and have been jumpy around electricily ever since.

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