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Rims On Handbuilt Bowls


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#1 Lemmingtherapist

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 09:55 AM

I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.

#2 venetiancat

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Posted 05 April 2010 - 10:10 AM

I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia
Julia Passamonti-Colamartino
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#3 Lemmingtherapist

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 05:39 AM


I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia



Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.

#4 Kathran

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Posted 06 April 2010 - 08:26 PM



I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.

#5 Lemmingtherapist

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Posted 09 April 2010 - 04:21 AM




I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.

#6 Pres

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Posted 15 September 2010 - 07:02 PM





I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.


A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#7 Lemmingtherapist

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Posted 16 September 2010 - 03:10 AM






I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.


A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.



#8 Lemmingtherapist

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Posted 16 September 2010 - 03:15 AM







I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.


A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.

That sounds really excellent - thanks. One of the problems is that the walls of the bowl are not as even a thickness as with wheel thrown, which leads me to trying to find 'disguises' for the rim rather than a tidy edge. Your method would correct the wall thickness at the rim too. I would think it would also make a strong rim as the tool will compress the clay as you use it.

#9 Pres

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Posted 16 September 2010 - 01:05 PM








I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.


A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.

That sounds really excellent - thanks. One of the problems is that the walls of the bowl are not as even a thickness as with wheel thrown, which leads me to trying to find 'disguises' for the rim rather than a tidy edge. Your method would correct the wall thickness at the rim too. I would think it would also make a strong rim as the tool will compress the clay as you use it.


You have hit the nail on the head, the tool will scrape/even out the clay toward the rim, and compress it at the same time. I got the original idea from using the squarish ribs with the little notch in the short sides. adding the chamois cushions the tool to help smooth and compress.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/


#10 APHenix artist

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 08:48 AM









I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.


A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.

That sounds really excellent - thanks. One of the problems is that the walls of the bowl are not as even a thickness as with wheel thrown, which leads me to trying to find 'disguises' for the rim rather than a tidy edge. Your method would correct the wall thickness at the rim too. I would think it would also make a strong rim as the tool will compress the clay as you use it.


You have hit the nail on the head, the tool will scrape/even out the clay toward the rim, and compress it at the same time. I got the original idea from using the squarish ribs with the little notch in the short sides. adding the chamois cushions the tool to help smooth and compress.

First of all, the prestige behind hand built ceramics is that it does not look as perfect as wheel thrown, so you have to get out of the idea that everything has to look perfect. Secondly, as you are hand buildin it is wise to constantly even out the rim by hitting it lightly and flat on a table so as to make it squared off. Any uneaveness can be pinched or paddled around to the areas that are thinner. As far as extruders, you do not need an expensive tool that constantly need cleaning. Coils can be hand rolled applying even pressure with long easy strokes. You can use your hand all the way up to your elbow. It takes a little practice; but in the end, by the time you set up the extruder with the large washer with a hole and get you clay ready and extrude onto some catcher then clean it otherwise you will be cleaning right when you need a coil... whew, you can roll your coil by hand. Always roll the thicker areas into the thinner with even pressure rilling from the middle out to the ends. When you get it down you will be able to make coils of any size and eventually shape. If you need help let me know, i might be able to make a youtube video.

#11 Deb Evans

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Posted 17 September 2010 - 10:35 PM

You can alter each rim rib w/ sandpaper or small files. Remember rims are a bit thicker than skin of pot. Good luck.



#12 richardsan

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Posted 19 September 2010 - 10:33 PM

I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.




resolving design elements are an easy path. don't struggle with the walk, enjoy the stroll.
wavy edges are easy. adding a coil, as mentioned will finish off the rim of a bowl quite nicely.
maybe draw the view towards the interior with the rim extending partway into the bowl.
so many possibilities...look at some antiquity pieces[museum or online search]
hth
richard

#13 Christine

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 06:24 AM

I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.



A pin tool held on a retort stand at the right height for trimming your pot and placed adjacent to your turntable will give an even depth to your pot as you turn it and then smoothing with a damp chamois leather will make the cut neat and tidy, but I'm with some of the other contributors to this topic - there is great beauty in "organic and uneven"! I wish you the very best
Christine

#14 Pres

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Posted 20 September 2010 - 02:25 PM










I'm a handbuilder and have recently gone back to trying to build small (max 5 inch diameter) bowls in the simplest possible way - thumb pots. Everything goes (and grows!) well, until I get to the rim, and then I'm torn between trying to make it look as neat 'n tidy as a thrown bowl, and going for the organic and uneven look. At the moment I'm not satisfied with either, because my neat and tidy attempts never look as good as wheel thrown, and my organic and uneven rims just look messy. I would be very grateful for any tips that anyone was willing to share to achieve a good result for either! I have recently sold my wheel because of back problems and thus have only a turntable to help me.


I have made rims using an extruder, which makes perfect, even coils. I then score the piece and the rim, apply slip,join taking care to not distort the coil and voila! ... a perfect rim. You can even the join out with a small rubber kidney or wooden tool as you turn your banding wheel. This technique also works great for feet.

The Chinese are masters at hand building and getting perfectly symmetrical pots. The key lies in having the right tools to precisely cut your clay prior to assembly. Chinese Clayart has some great handbuilding tools, especially those used for doing Yixing teapots (see Teapot Video)

Hope this helps,
Julia


Thanks for your helpful suggestions. I'll look into getting an extruder to try out your tip, and I'll check out the links.


I'm a handbuilder too and generally really like an even rim, especially on cups and tumblers. I use a shimpo banding wheel so when I'm ready to do the rim, I center the pot on the wheel then take a sharp knife and bracing my hand on something turn the wheel while I gradually cut the top edge from the pot. After I smooth with a sponge the rim is very level and even. Another technique I use is to level the rim, then attach a strip of clay the desired width by the length I need to go around the rim (score and slip) then attach the beveled ends and smooth the seam. I find a nice even coil of clay can be a great way to finish off the edge as well. I often attach the coil to the top outside edge of the pot and smooth only that part of the join, leaving what looks like a complete coil on the outside.



Thanks for your help. I will experiment with using my banding wheel and trimming.


A tool that I made for the students trying to get a nice rim was to take a 1/4 inch board and make a 2" narrow rib with a flat edge. Make it about 4" long. Drill a hole 3/4 inch, 5/8", 1" whatever-cut in half for two tools with half circle in each on one edge, line the edge with chamois-glue or staple. Soak it in water before use, and then when the rim is cut to the position you want run the tool around the rim in long strokes, it will fold over the edge in the beginning and then round into the wall of the pot.

That sounds really excellent - thanks. One of the problems is that the walls of the bowl are not as even a thickness as with wheel thrown, which leads me to trying to find 'disguises' for the rim rather than a tidy edge. Your method would correct the wall thickness at the rim too. I would think it would also make a strong rim as the tool will compress the clay as you use it.


You have hit the nail on the head, the tool will scrape/even out the clay toward the rim, and compress it at the same time. I got the original idea from using the squarish ribs with the little notch in the short sides. adding the chamois cushions the tool to help smooth and compress.

First of all, the prestige behind hand built ceramics is that it does not look as perfect as wheel thrown, so you have to get out of the idea that everything has to look perfect. Secondly, as you are hand buildin it is wise to constantly even out the rim by hitting it lightly and flat on a table so as to make it squared off. Any uneaveness can be pinched or paddled around to the areas that are thinner. As far as extruders, you do not need an expensive tool that constantly need cleaning. Coils can be hand rolled applying even pressure with long easy strokes. You can use your hand all the way up to your elbow. It takes a little practice; but in the end, by the time you set up the extruder with the large washer with a hole and get you clay ready and extrude onto some catcher then clean it otherwise you will be cleaning right when you need a coil... whew, you can roll your coil by hand. Always roll the thicker areas into the thinner with even pressure rilling from the middle out to the ends. When you get it down you will be able to make coils of any size and eventually shape. If you need help let me know, i might be able to make a youtube video.


Aesthetics aside, you asked for a tool. I think you will find that the tool I described will leave pretty much a natural look, not necessarily an unfinished look, but natural especially if used with long strokes and water.
On the other hand if you are interested in coils using an extruder you might try some of the larger hand held extruders that look like putty guns. The best way to use any extruder is to extrude your coils, and cover them with plastic till ready to use. Usually we would extrude one day and build the next. The extruded coil pieces are much more symmetric and regular than the hand rolled coils almost mechanical in their regularity. However, if you check many of the "traditional coil pieces they have been scraped to where the coils are not evident as a forming technique. As I believe, this is a matter of aesthetic choice on the part of the potter. Personally, if the piece seems true to its intent it works for me.

Simply retired teacher, not dead, living the dream. on and on and. . . . on. . . .                                                                                 http://picworkspottery.blogspot.com/





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