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Beehive Kiln?


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#1 Biglou13

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 07:31 PM

i've learned about some old beehive kilns.  was told they were built to fire construction bricks.

 

?what temp are construction bricks fired to?

?what temp cone will kiln bricks from said beehive kiln withstand?

?if unknown how would i test?


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#2 neilestrick

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 08:54 PM

What exactly are you getting yourself into? :unsure:


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#3 Biglou13

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:03 PM

Lol you can see the wheels turning........

Nothing big........maybe borrowing bricks( abandoned sites) with permission to build wood (ish) fired kiln.

(Thinking. Cheap to free fire brick)
Caution big brother is watching.
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The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
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#4 Mark C.

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:04 PM

Some beeehive kilns fired charcoal as well

Are you salvaging said bricks or wanting to make bricks??

Another potter I know made soemone of a kind brcks fired to cone 10

I have one and can post a photo?

Mark


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#5 neilestrick

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:10 PM

i've learned about some old beehive kilns.  was told they were built to fire construction bricks.

 

?what temp are construction bricks fired to?

?what temp cone will kiln bricks from said beehive kiln withstand?

?if unknown how would i test?

 

I really know nothing about these kilns, but here's my thoughts:

1. Depends on the bricks.

2. Depends on the kiln.

3. Fire it till the bricks melt. Then you know you've gone too hot! But seriously, if you could get a brick from the kiln and cut off some slices, you could fire them at various temps and check for shrinkage.


Neil Estrick
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www.neilestrickgallery.com

neil@neilestrickgallery.com

#6 bciskepottery

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:29 PM

?what temp are construction bricks fired to?
 

From between 900 to 1200C, depending on clay and color desired.

?what temp cone will kiln bricks from said beehive kiln withstand?

 

Hopefully kiln bricks will withstand whatever temperature you choose.

?if unknown how would i test?

 

Firing would tell.  But, bricks are also rated and you could check before you buy.

 

Just how big is your backyard . . . wood kiln, beehive kiln.  Some tunnel kilns for making bricks were 300+ feet long -- not including chamber for drying the bricks before firing. 



#7 justanassembler

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:35 PM

Lol you can see the wheels turning........

Nothing big........maybe borrowing bricks( abandoned sites) with permission to build wood (ish) fired kiln.

(Thinking. Cheap to free fire brick)

also--"borrowing" materials from "abandoned" sites can get you felony theft charges if the owner hasn't given you permission...  



#8 Biglou13

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 09:48 PM

Kilns were built to fire red construction bricks. Brick production failed, (warping issues) brick production ceased.......Kilns abandoned, land has changed hands many time, Will get permission !!!! Stealing is BAD karma, and immoral, not to mention violation of code of artists....... In these parts Will get you shot!! At this point it's pure conjecture!!
Caution big brother is watching.
The beige is blinding!!!!!!
The middle of the road is boring

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.
-Albert Einstein

#9 Mark C.

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Posted 01 October 2013 - 10:11 PM

I would get one brick and test before jumping thru anymore hoops as the whole thing may go sour with one test when they bloat at temp.

Mark


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#10 justanassembler

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 12:49 AM

I would get one brick and test before jumping thru anymore hoops as the whole thing may go sour with one test when they bloat at temp.

Mark

It is also advisable to do a crude hot crush test by setting the brick up so that it is supported on both ends of its length and weighted in the middle, as I have seen brick that passed the heating test only to fail under load.



#11 JBaymore

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 09:38 AM

Odds are good that the KILNS were constructed of standard firebricks available at the time of construction.  Red bricks are typically fired in the 1800 F - 2000 F range.  But the beehive kiln likely was designed to fire for a long time... so the bricks are likey at least medium duty firebricks.....not for the temperature of use but for durability in the repeated firing cycles.

 

Get a brick....... look for a name or letters imprinted on the side of it.  List that name here.   If there is NO imprint... they likely are LOW DUTY firebricks. 

 

best,

 

.....................john


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#12 DPancioli

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 10:30 AM

Hi:  This is a bit off topic--but also about kilns.  Our university is going to have a North Caroline potter Daniel

Johnston join us for the winter semester.  He is a phenomenal kiln builder.  Please take a look at his website,

use his name, where he shows the new huge kiln he is building.  He learned to do it in Thailand.

 

Diana Pancioli


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#13 Wyndham

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 12:34 PM

There's a, or was a brick maker in D'Hanis Tx(sp) that fired construction red brick from the local red clay, The hives were downdraft, fired with propane and the chimney was common to 3 different kilns.There were 6 burners spaced equidistant around the base with a "U" shaped fired box/bagwall inside for each burner, About a week to fire, If i remember and several weeks to cool. The bricks were stacked leaving spaces, sort of cross hatched multilevel stacking. The downdraft was to a central tunnel that went to the chimney which was about 60 to 80 ft tall, don't remember.

 

wyndham



#14 JBaymore

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Posted 02 October 2013 - 01:45 PM

Somewhere in my files I have pictures of that style of beehive kiln, from back in the 70's, Wyndham.  They are great.  LOVE the interior spaces.

 

best,

 

........................john


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#15 perkolator

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Posted 03 October 2013 - 05:50 PM

Nearby my location we have Gladding McBean, where they have several beehive kilns that are still used for firing sewer pipes.  They are pretty big, maybe 25ft tall, 30-40ft diameter, downdraft kiln powered by 6-8 natural gas burners.  I believe they fire them up to around Cone 7 and it takes around 3wks (1wk preheat, 1wk firing, 1wk cooling).

 

here's our students going through the beehive kiln room/warehouse a few years ago when you could still tour the facility:

Attached File  photo (15).JPG   112.24KB   0 downloads

and one off the net:

Beehive%20Kiln.jpg

 






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