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ayjay

Redart

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Redart doesn't act like a true earthenware clay.  It is closer to a stoneware.  Check out the AP green material list or other source.  It is assumed that it is an earthenware because of the high iron content.  Unless you fire in reduction it can go quite high.

It also can be a very nice substitute for OM4 or EPK in glazes especially if you also need a bit of iron.

 

Old Ladys 2 part clay recipe of XX Sager and Redart was my "invention".  I needed an easy and cheap clay for students at LFCC.  We needed to be able to make it in the studio. I did a few tests after reading an article of Vals on switching to cone 6. Sager gives it a little tooth but it is still very smooth for beginning throwers.  We even rakued it.

 

At cone 6 it fires a nice rich orangey brown.  The iron helps activate copper and cobalt glazes providing good visual texture.

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I've been looking for a cone 6 simple clay for a project I have in mind. It's a slabbed  red orange body with a cream slip or vitreous engobe and while the slip is wet finger trail a simple design through the wet slip. All of this for a dinnerware set.

Thanks for posting.

Wyndham

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Redart ..............................

 

It also can be a very nice substitute for OM4 or EPK in glazes especially if you also need a bit of iron.

 

Is the reverse also true?

 

I'm guessing the missing iron will make a big difference.unsure.png

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rcts...

om 4  and epk   sub for redart?

 

im a newb  and will do more research   but epk and om4  

 

epk matures cone 34 ish

om 4   matures at cone 11 ish

 

the diversity of these 2 ingredients causes me to question? (respectufully)

 

im just starting to make my own clay bodies and have a lot to learn. and as far as that goes am self / internet educated.  thanks for the clay body   did you name it   (red art/xx)??    ill be getting raw materials on my next weekday off and these 2 are on the list.   do you have a body formula that is standard 266 like?

 

old lady....  thanks for pictures,  (the signature was covered to protect the innocent....)(joke) what glaze is that ?

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rcts,

back in 1986 I visited with Harding Black in San Antonio Tx. He had a cone 6 clay that also was 50/50 blend clay, it's  red art/Okmulgee.

This clay was very mucky but made a great  clay for a copper blue glaze.

I'll post some test when I can.

Wyndham

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rcts...

om 4  and epk   sub for redart?

 

im a newb  and will do more research   but epk and om4  

 

epk matures cone 34 ish

om 4   matures at cone 11 ish

 

the diversity of these 2 ingredients causes me to question? (respectufully)

 

im just starting to make my own clay bodies and have a lot to learn. and as far as that goes am self / internet educated.  thanks for the clay body   did you name it   (red art/xx)??    ill be getting raw materials on my next weekday off and these 2 are on the list.   do you have a body formula that is standard 266 like?

 

old lady....  thanks for pictures,  (the signature was covered to protect the innocent....)(joke) what glaze is that ?

Here is a nice example.

Choy Blue Celedon ^9/10

Custer      50

Whiting   6.2

EPK        6

Flint         22.80

Barium Carb   15

 

add

Red Iron Oxide   1.00

Barnard              1.00

 

The color in this glaze is from the iron in a reducing atmosphere, and suspended bubbles in the glaze, but if not reduced it will not look blue.

All the ingredients in the glaze are very white, (w/o iron).    Glaze recipes are based on eutectic, that is how a combination of ingredients causes melt not just the individual materials melting point. one of the things  clay does in a glaze is keep the glass, (glaze) from running off the piece.  It adds Aluminum which is the most refractory-takes the most heat to melt-however clay can also contribute other qualities, like iron for color. Since the clay in the recipe is EPK and only 6% a fun substitution to try would be redart for all or part of the EPK.  You then could reduce the amt of RIO and Barnard.

Just something fun to try.

Rcts

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im just starting to make my own clay bodies and have a lot to learn. and as far as that goes am self / internet educated.  thanks for the clay body   did you name it   (red art/xx)??    ill be getting raw materials on my next weekday off and these 2 are on the list.   do you have a body formula that is standard 266 like?

 

 

I guess I really didn't have a name for it sager/redart or redart/sager??  I don't think sager is usually referred to as xx.

I am sorry I am not a big standard fan, so I am not sure what 266 is.

r

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Out of curiosity could you make that two part clay with Goldart as opposed to Redart? 

Hey!

I was just about to send that recipe.

50 Goldart

50 Redart.

fired to cone 6 oxidation.

I got the recipe from Val Cushing, so it probably works. I haven't tested it.

I like like two part clay bodies.

I also like 4 part glazes.

Hope John Baymore is still on holidays in Japan.

Can they get the internet over there?

TJR.

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Redart ..............................

 

It also can be a very nice substitute for OM4 or EPK in glazes especially if you also need a bit of iron.

 

Is the reverse also true?

 

I'm guessing the missing iron will make a big difference.unsure.png

 

Careful here. Redart is quite coarse and will cause you a lot of sieving. Also, you will lower the temperature of your glaze because of the added iron in the Redart.

TJR.

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Test? Where you gonna get Ocmulgee?

 

Jim

Jim that was 25  years ago but I have some Blackjack clay from east Texas that might be an interesting test. It's a natural clay with a lot of fine sand and the red art might make it smoother to turn, otherwise I'll use Sagger.

I believe you are in Georgia, right, you have some LIzella that might make for an interesting test with red art.

I'll mix up a small batch next week after I get the kiln loaded and going.

Wyndham

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Test? Where you gonna get Ocmulgee?

 

Jim

Jim that was 25  years ago but I have some Blackjack clay from east Texas that might be an interesting test. It's a natural clay with a lot of fine sand and the red art might make it smoother to turn, otherwise I'll use Sagger.

I believe you are in Georgia, right, you have some LIzella that might make for an interesting test with red art.

I'll mix up a small batch next week after I get the kiln loaded and going.

Wyndham

 

 

Yes, I live in Lizella. Ocmulgee was dug on the Ocmulgee River that runs through Macon (10 miles away) and was very similar to Lizella Clay which is dug on the Echeconnee which runs into the Ocmulgee. Lizella Clay is still available.

 

Jim

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