Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
kokopelle2012

mason stains aren't steadfast, whats missing?

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

 

I've been making terra-cotta pots for my plants. The pots i paint with mason stains, then fire. I fire to cones between 03 and 5. What i'm finding is that once these pots have been fired, many of the colors i've applied tend to rub off. I dont want to use an over glaze, its very important to me that the surface remain flat/matt free of sealants. Other times the mason stains turn to dark olive greens and browns and yellows, like rotten bruises. (this is after they've come in contact with water). Has anyone worked with this, come across these problems, or have suggestions on proper mason stain mixtures?

 

 

I'm typically measuring by eye, water, pigment, some flint, some light bodied clays and some of the base clay used for the pot thats being painted. (i have an ingredients list at the studio if thats needed)

i've attached 2 pictures, one is of a pot fresh out of the kiln, the other is one thats gotten wet a few times.

what are your thoughts!!!???

 

 

-isaac

post-13114-136962443513_thumb.jpg

post-13114-136962468342_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I've been making terra-cotta pots for my plants. The pots i paint with mason stains, then fire. I fire to cones between 03 and 5. What i'm finding is that once these pots have been fired, many of the colors i've applied tend to rub off. I dont want to use an over glaze, its very important to me that the surface remain flat/matt free of sealants. Other times the mason stains turn to dark olive greens and browns and yellows, like rotten bruises. (this is after they've come in contact with water). Has anyone worked with this, come across these problems, or have suggestions on proper mason stain mixtures?

I'm typically measuring by eye, water, pigment, some flint, some light bodied clays and some of the base clay used for the pot thats being painted. (i have an ingredients list at the studio if thats needed)

i've attached 2 pictures, one is of a pot fresh out of the kiln, the other is one thats gotten wet a few times.

what are your thoughts!!!???

-isaac

 

If your surfaces are rubbing off, they havent been fired onto the pots to begin with.... Mason stains really arent meant to be used alone, and simply adding silica to a low-fire wash wont flux it enough to stick...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I've been making terra-cotta pots for my plants. The pots i paint with mason stains, then fire. I fire to cones between 03 and 5. What i'm finding is that once these pots have been fired, many of the colors i've applied tend to rub off. I dont want to use an over glaze, its very important to me that the surface remain flat/matt free of sealants. Other times the mason stains turn to dark olive greens and browns and yellows, like rotten bruises. (this is after they've come in contact with water). Has anyone worked with this, come across these problems, or have suggestions on proper mason stain mixtures?

I'm typically measuring by eye, water, pigment, some flint, some light bodied clays and some of the base clay used for the pot thats being painted. (i have an ingredients list at the studio if thats needed)

i've attached 2 pictures, one is of a pot fresh out of the kiln, the other is one thats gotten wet a few times.

what are your thoughts!!!???

-isaac

 

 

You aren't using the Mason Stains correctly. There are many ways to use them but just painting them on with some silica and clay and firing to a random cone between 03 and 5 is not one of them. Test first.

 

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would be 100% happier and get nice consistent results if you used underglazes instead of random mason stain mixtures. Amaco velvets work wonderfully and keep a nice velvet like surface. They are not expensive and would save you money in the long run because you would have less failures.

kheicksen likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You would be 100% happier and get nice consistent results if you used underglazes instead of random mason stain mixtures. Amaco velvets work wonderfully and keep a nice velvet like surface. They are not expensive and would save you money in the long run because you would have less failures.

 

 

 

 

 

thank you for saying what i would have. but you are much more polite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty much already covered, but just going to agree.

 

Mason stains are usually just colorants. Painting them onto the surface of unglazed clay, especially low fire (e.g. more porous) clay, means that they have nothing to "adhere" them to the clay body. They're essentially just dust on top of the clay and a lot of them will wash off.

 

You would either need to mix a frit with them (as mentioned, I think 3110 is good around this temperature range) which will flux them to the clay body...

 

Or -- what I would do -- buy a pre-mixed underglaze that is specced for your temperature range. They come with fluxes already in them and are formulated for staying power and vibrancy.

 

Hope some of this has helped!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×