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Shaker-mixer.


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#1 Claypple

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 09:26 AM

Home-Depot's paint department uses some kind of shakers to mix the paint. I think it is more efficient than using a mixer that you dip into the glaze.
Anybody knows what would work like that shaker /how to make that kind of equipment?

#2 celia12345678910

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 09:52 AM

I have seen empty paint cans you can buy, possibly you could find a used paint mixer and put your glazes in the paint cans just to mix, then add to your big containers?

#3 neilestrick

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 10:08 AM

Mixer blades work great, and they're faster than shakers. Mixers also do a better job, because they break up clumps with the shearing action of the blades. Shakers are not good for clumps. Mixers also scrape the bottom of the bucket to get all the settled stuff into the mix. They use shakers for paint because it allows them to mix with the can closed, so it's much cleaner. Imagine having to wash paint off a mixer every time you mixed a gallon...
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#4 Claypple

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 10:26 AM

Mixer blades work great, and they're faster than shakers. Mixers also do a better job, because they break up clumps with the shearing action of the blades. Shakers are not good for clumps. Mixers also scrape the bottom of the bucket to get all the settled stuff into the mix. They use shakers for paint because it allows them to mix with the can closed, so it's much cleaner. Imagine having to wash paint off a mixer every time you mixed a gallon...


OK, thank you for the answer. Just seems like the mixer is pulling some glaze off the can every time I use it, but what you said makes sense.

#5 Bobg

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 10:27 AM

I use a mixer on my drill. One thing you want to make sure of is if you mix in a plastic bucket that there are no sharp edges on the mixer. I ended up with pieces of plastic bucket in my glaze when I first mixed up the glaze. Good think I sieve it a couple of times after mixing, that's the only way I would have found out it was in there.

Bob

#6 Denice

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 02:47 PM

Good thought on the paint mixer shows your brain is always spinning. I owned a wallpaper-paint store for 20 years and paint that has set for a long time can be hard sometimes impossible to shake up. Denice

#7 SmartsyArtsy

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 12:22 AM

I used a drill/mixer for years, right up til I did a major cleanup a few month ago and misplaced it. Coincidentally, just before that, I had also taken the advice of Mea and purchased plastic toilet brushes from the dollar store. I keep one in each bucket. They mixup the glaze so well that I haven't missed using the mixer. but I still want to know WTH the damn thing is!

#8 Diane Puckett

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 06:36 PM

I used a drill/mixer for years, right up til I did a major cleanup a few month ago and misplaced it. Coincidentally, just before that, I had also taken the advice of Mea and purchased plastic toilet brushes from the dollar store. I keep one in each bucket. They mixup the glaze so well that I haven't missed using the mixer. but I still want to know WTH the damn thing is!

I have found that the best way to find a missing item is to purchase a replacement.
Diane Puckett
Dry Ridge Pottery

#9 Denice

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 08:15 PM

The missing item always shows up a day or two later after I have replaced it, at my estate sale people will be shaking their heads and wonder why I have 5 needle tools or 3 identical pottery knives and the list goes on and on. Denice




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