Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Any helpful drying hints?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 382 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 03 March 2013 - 04:54 PM

I just finished my first piece that I made on my own and now don't quite know the best way to dry it so it doesn't crack. In class at the end of the day the teacher asks us if we are done and if we are he covers it in plastic and sets it on a shelf. When we come back to class the next week they are all miraculously drying or dried and ready for the next step. I have noticed that the plastic seems to be in a different positions or state when we get to the next class so he must be doing something to help them dry properly yes? Soooo what magic is he doing while we are not looking? I finished a large cooking utensil holder here at home and it is currently sitting on and wrapped in plastic in preparation for drying. Do I just leave it wrapped up? If so for how long? Do I slowly remove the plastic over so many days? I have attached a picture so you can see what the item looks like since I know that may help in any suggestions given.
Thank you in advance for your help.

Attached Files


The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#2 bciskepottery

bciskepottery

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,423 posts
  • LocationNorthern Virginia

Posted 03 March 2013 - 05:25 PM

Let it dry slowly. I'd keep the whole thing under plastic the first day to allow the moisture in the clay to even itself. Then, unwrap but keep plastic over the top third . . . the bottom is thicker and moisture will go towards the bottom due to gravity; keeping the top under wraps allows the moisture to evaporate more evenly. Keep it in a place where the temperature is even and consistent. Let the pot dry on its time, not someone else's. This is the part where you learn patience is your friend.

#3 Mark McCombs

Mark McCombs

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 123 posts
  • LocationSW Washington

Posted 03 March 2013 - 05:54 PM

Turning my pots upside down, I let them dry uncovered during the day and then cover them each night.
This will extend the drying time several days in my case.


Posted Image
Mark
Fast Hawk Pottery


^5-6 Ox
1227 Skutt

#4 Marcia Selsor

Marcia Selsor

    Professor Emerita, Montana State University-Billings

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,845 posts
  • Locationwhere Texas, Matamoros, Rio Grande and Gulf of Mexico come together.

Posted 03 March 2013 - 06:45 PM

I agree. Turn it over. I would also put it on a couple of sticks so there is air all around it.

Marcia

#5 Davidpotter

Davidpotter

    Determined Young Buck

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 69 posts
  • LocationCambridge, Wisconsin

Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:29 PM

I just finished my first piece that I made on my own and now don't quite know the best way to dry it so it doesn't crack. In class at the end of the day the teacher asks us if we are done and if we are he covers it in plastic and sets it on a shelf. When we come back to class the next week they are all miraculously drying or dried and ready for the next step. I have noticed that the plastic seems to be in a different positions or state when we get to the next class so he must be doing something to help them dry properly yes? Soooo what magic is he doing while we are not looking? I finished a large cooking utensil holder here at home and it is currently sitting on and wrapped in plastic in preparation for drying. Do I just leave it wrapped up? If so for how long? Do I slowly remove the plastic over so many days? I have attached a picture so you can see what the item looks like since I know that may help in any suggestions given.
Thank you in advance for your help.


I never use plastic unless its really thin or if there is a possibility of warping. though sometimes the room is a little too dry and i one will crack.
Practice, practice, practice. Then when you think you've practiced enough, the real practice begins.

#6 Pugaboo

Pugaboo

    Lifetime artist 2nd year potter

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 382 posts
  • LocationHelen, GA

Posted 03 March 2013 - 10:48 PM

Reading your suggestions I am wondering if moving it into a drying cabinet that I have that has wire shelves in it would be helpful. It's the size of a small refrigerator but not air tight, got it from a hospital when they closed down their old ex-ray lab and went digital instead; they used it to dry the big sheets of ex-rays. I don't have to turn on the fan or heater but it would be in a controlled environment that should (I think) give it a stable air environment to dry in and the shelf should allow air around it 360 degrees. Do you think I should still turn it upside down to dry? Won't the wire shelves leave indents across the top edge? It might take a little longer to dry in the cabinet due to limited air flow but again going by your suggestions slower is better yes?

Thank you for the suggestions I really appreciate you taking the time to help a beginning potter.

Terry
The world is but a canvas to the imagination - Henry David Thoreau

#7 Mark C.

Mark C.

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,753 posts
  • LocationNear Arcata Ca-redwood rain forest

Posted 04 March 2013 - 12:27 AM

We drape all handle production with thin plastic for 1 night. The best is those thin bags from like a dry cleaners-cut open in sheet form.
Also used a bunch of the thin plastic from store Banana boxes as it has some small holes so it slows but does not stop the drying process.

Mark
Mark Cortright
www.liscomhillpottery.com

#8 Denice

Denice

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 664 posts
  • LocationWichita, Kansas

Posted 04 March 2013 - 09:59 AM

Metal racks can leave pressure marks that might show if your using clear glaze, I have never chip or dented my pieces in my drying cabinet. Have you used this cabinet before? My first cabinet was an old refrigerator it was too tight, my second one was plastic shelves wrapped in plastic, too fragile. Third one in a plastic utility cabinet with adjustable shelves and already vented, it works perfect, I put old refrigerator racks on the shelves so the clay doesn't sit on plastic and had better air flow. Denice




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users