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Horse Hair Surface Decoration


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#1 Venicemud

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 08:27 PM

A friend just contacted me with the sad news of the passing of a dear friend of hers. She has been charged with the responsibility of making an urn for his ashes and would love to use horse hair decoration. I assume she must mean horse hair raku and I have no familiarity with the technique. Do any of you have any suggestions that would be helpful, firing temperature, type of clay, how much horse hair, etc? Thank you for being a deep pond of knowledge, Joan Klotz.

#2 Flora

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Posted 22 February 2013 - 09:08 PM

A friend just contacted me with the sad news of the passing of a dear friend of hers. She has been charged with the responsibility of making an urn for his ashes and would love to use horse hair decoration. I assume she must mean horse hair raku and I have no familiarity with the technique. Do any of you have any suggestions that would be helpful, firing temperature, type of clay, how much horse hair, etc? Thank you for being a deep pond of knowledge, Joan Klotz.


www.pyromaniapottery.ca is a wonderful studio gallery on Vancouver Island Canada... one of their potters makes incredible horsehair pots, and I'm sure that she would be more than happy to assist you.


Flora Walton



#3 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:19 AM

Horse hair decorating is done at a much lower temperature (1100-1200 F or so) than raku 1850 F.
The piece is removed and long horse tail hairs are contacted with the hot surface which carbonizes into the surface. One or two hairs at a time quickly before the piece cools.
The surface is usually burnished with terra sig prior the bisque firing (^09)

For a burial urn, I would think you would want a vitrified clay body. The horse hair is porous and soft by the nature of the process.

Marcia

http://ceramicartsda...iring-surfaces/



#4 Cherry

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 08:57 AM

A good, and free, source for horse tail hair is music stores that re-string bows for string instruments.

#5 neilestrick

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 09:47 AM

Use a fine grained clay body, and burnish it before firing. Heat to 1200F, pull it from the kiln, add the horse hair QUICKLY, then cover it with a bucket to slow the cooling. Wash it down after it cools, let it dry for a couple of days, then wax and buff the surface with any car wax.
Neil Estrick
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#6 Christine

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 10:19 AM

Use a fine grained clay body, and burnish it before firing. Heat to 1200F, pull it from the kiln, add the horse hair QUICKLY, then cover it with a bucket to slow the cooling. Wash it down after it cools, let it dry for a couple of days, then wax and buff the surface with any car wax.



Thanks very much for this concise and helpful reply, Neil, I too was under the impression that raku firing was required
Christine

#7 neilestrick

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 11:06 AM


Use a fine grained clay body, and burnish it before firing. Heat to 1200F, pull it from the kiln, add the horse hair QUICKLY, then cover it with a bucket to slow the cooling. Wash it down after it cools, let it dry for a couple of days, then wax and buff the surface with any car wax.



Thanks very much for this concise and helpful reply, Neil, I too was under the impression that raku firing was required
Christine


It is like raku firing in that you're pulling the piece from the kiln while still hot, but you're not doing the post-firing reduction. One word of warning- if you get too much hair trapped under the cooling bucket, it can cause some reduction and grey out the surface. Before you cover it make sure there's very little unburned hair in there.
Neil Estrick
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Owner, Neil Estrick Gallery, LLC
www.neilestrickgallery.com

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#8 Venicemud

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 01:20 PM

Thank you all for the helpful, knowledgeable answers to my questions. I emailed my friend instructing her how to access these posts and she found them very helpful and sends her thanks too. Joan Klotz

#9 kathi

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 09:26 PM

Use a fine grained clay body, and burnish it before firing. Heat to 1200F, pull it from the kiln, add the horse hair QUICKLY, then cover it with a bucket to slow the cooling. Wash it down after it cools, let it dry for a couple of days, then wax and buff the surface with any car wax.


What kind of clay are you using when you do this?

#10 Marcia Selsor

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 10:51 AM

I use porcelain or smooth earthenware with white or red terra sig respectively.

 

Marcia

http://ceramicartsda...iring-surfaces/






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