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#1 Potterjen

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 09:41 AM

I am overseeing a student art show for the kids/teens at my studio and am wanting to have the kids classes all do a certain project that will be impactful to the viewers...any ideas?

#2 Chris Campbell

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:10 AM

I just saw the "Artwork is work" bumper sticker and this occurs to me ....

These kids will get to the stage where they might have to justify their Art and their desire to pursue Art as a college/career/life choice.
How about a theme that shows Art as a valuable and necessary part of everyone's life? Something showing how it makes your surroundings more interesting and cheerful? Black and white images of something drab beside an artful reproduction??

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#3 Potterjen

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 11:17 AM

I just saw the "Artwork is work" bumper sticker and this occurs to me ....

These kids will get to the stage where they might have to justify their Art and their desire to pursue Art as a college/career/life choice.
How about a theme that shows Art as a valuable and necessary part of everyone's life? Something showing how it makes your surroundings more interesting and cheerful? Black and white images of something drab beside an artful reproduction??



I appreciate this insite and I will definetly keep it in mind. Creativity and fun- I just came across a self portrait sculpture project on Amacos website. I think the kids would have fun with this one! I do have a few though that get discouraged when they dont get something perfect so I am a bit apprehensive about doing a sculpture project. Any advice there?

#4 Denice

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

The self portrait in clay might be a little much for those who get discouraged easily. I remember the first project we did in high school, we each brought in a card board carton and cut up slabs and built the pieces inside the carton and then tore the carton off when the clay set up. My first one was a small oatmeal carton and I found a oval hat box for my second one, the students like it so well that we did two. Both of my carton pieces won state awards so you can get acceptable pieces from that technique.

#5 TJR

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 09:07 AM

What about a tile project? Get some scrap matt board from your local frame shop.[free!]. Cut into 6 inch square templates. Have each student roll out a tile using a rolling pin and sticks of equal thickness. Get your students to create a bas relief tile of their own face. [Bas relief- slightly raised. ].
You will have to re-cut all the tiles so they are square, when leather hard. Bisque, then colourfully glaze them. Can be mounted in a group, but most will want to take them home.
TJR.Posted Image

#6 Pres

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 09:52 AM

What about a tile project? Get some scrap matt board from your local frame shop.[free!]. Cut into 6 inch square templates. Have each student roll out a tile using a rolling pin and sticks of equal thickness. Get your students to create a bas relief tile of their own face. [Bas relief- slightly raised. ].
You will have to re-cut all the tiles so they are square, when leather hard. Bisque, then colourfully glaze them. Can be mounted in a group, but most will want to take them home.
TJR.Posted Image


Tile projects can be extended into a single piece. I did a project for a few years where with 6 tables and 4 students to a table I had them all do a tile project where one person from each table would do a tile. That tile had to match up with lines, shapes etc to a tile on another table in a grid pattern. The tiles were based on themes, one set of six may have been self portraits, one could have been family pets, another heroes, etc.

Another type of project I did was extrusions based on a theme-Crazy plumbing, Fairy/Spirit houses, Crooked house, or Hard Geometry. These were themes to get them to think, investigate, or define. I often had some really nice pieces from these, some fountains with actual pumps, some lantern forms, garden sculptures, night lights, and other useful decorative and fun art.

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#7 OffCenter

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:17 AM

What's wrong with just letting each kid decide what to make for the show? Or, if you're determined to make it a project, let them decide as a group what the project will be?

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#8 Potterjen

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:31 AM

What's wrong with just letting each kid decide what to make for the show? Or, if you're determined to make it a project, let them decide as a group what the project will be?

Jim



I think this is a great idea for high schoolers, mine are ages 8-13. I like to start with some inspiration and then let them go from there. I guess we are all that way :) Whichever project we do I wll take this point into consideration to spark their individuality. Thanks!

#9 Potterjen

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:32 AM


What about a tile project? Get some scrap matt board from your local frame shop.[free!]. Cut into 6 inch square templates. Have each student roll out a tile using a rolling pin and sticks of equal thickness. Get your students to create a bas relief tile of their own face. [Bas relief- slightly raised. ].
You will have to re-cut all the tiles so they are square, when leather hard. Bisque, then colourfully glaze them. Can be mounted in a group, but most will want to take them home.
TJR.Posted Image


Tile projects can be extended into a single piece. I did a project for a few years where with 6 tables and 4 students to a table I had them all do a tile project where one person from each table would do a tile. That tile had to match up with lines, shapes etc to a tile on another table in a grid pattern. The tiles were based on themes, one set of six may have been self portraits, one could have been family pets, another heroes, etc.

Another type of project I did would be extrusions base on a theme-Crazy plumbing, Fairy/Spirit houses, Crooked house, or Hard Geometry. These were themes to get them to think, investigate, or define. I often had some really nice pieces form these, some fountains with actual pumps, some lantern forms, garden sculptures, night lights, and other useful decorative and fun art.


I love this idea! I would love to have it on my wall in the studio! This would be a good intro project for every student~ thank you!

#10 Potterjen

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 10:34 AM

The self portrait in clay might be a little much for those who get discouraged easily. I remember the first project we did in high school, we each brought in a card board carton and cut up slabs and built the pieces inside the carton and then tore the carton off when the clay set up. My first one was a small oatmeal carton and I found a oval hat box for my second one, the students like it so well that we did two. Both of my carton pieces won state awards so you can get acceptable pieces from that technique.



So, you put the slabs inside the milk carton & oatmeal container, let them dry leather hard and then peeled the container off. Did you then smooth the outside and add texture etc to the outside?

#11 Denice

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 02:34 PM


The self portrait in clay might be a little much for those who get discouraged easily. I remember the first project we did in high school, we each brought in a card board carton and cut up slabs and built the pieces inside the carton and then tore the carton off when the clay set up. My first one was a small oatmeal carton and I found a oval hat box for my second one, the students like it so well that we did two. Both of my carton pieces won state awards so you can get acceptable pieces from that technique.



So, you put the slabs inside the milk carton & oatmeal container, let them dry leather hard and then peeled the container off. Did you then smooth the outside and add texture etc to the outside?


We would just clean them up, a little fill any voids that seem like they would cause a problem. The melding of the pieces together pushing against the outer carton created nice soft areas and they really didn't need much. I think the trick is to make sure the clay is moist enough that it can be smoothed easily as it's being pushed together. If they want to roll out coils, cut out geometric pattern, or lay out a pattern before they start have them cover them with plastic so the clay doesn't dry out. Denice

#12 Potterjen

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:58 AM



The self portrait in clay might be a little much for those who get discouraged easily. I remember the first project we did in high school, we each brought in a card board carton and cut up slabs and built the pieces inside the carton and then tore the carton off when the clay set up. My first one was a small oatmeal carton and I found a oval hat box for my second one, the students like it so well that we did two. Both of my carton pieces won state awards so you can get acceptable pieces from that technique.



So, you put the slabs inside the milk carton & oatmeal container, let them dry leather hard and then peeled the container off. Did you then smooth the outside and add texture etc to the outside?


We would just clean them up, a little fill any voids that seem like they would cause a problem. The melding of the pieces together pushing against the outer carton created nice soft areas and they really didn't need much. I think the trick is to make sure the clay is moist enough that it can be smoothed easily as it's being pushed together. If they want to roll out coils, cut out geometric pattern, or lay out a pattern before they start have them cover them with plastic so the clay doesn't dry out. Denice



I will definetly try this one too, it sounds fun. We ususally will build without a support like that, we just let the clay stiffen up a bit but the kids would really appreciat this, especially adding some coils inside.

#13 derp

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Posted 09 April 2013 - 03:40 AM

Like such ideas. These are very best to boost the creativity skills among the children and this will also create the healthy environment of competition as children will like to do the best of their best. I am also thinking of applying this too.

 

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