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Rebekah Krieger

More newbie glaze questions

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I have 2 questions

1- love the iredescent glazes, and it seems it is achieved easily in gas kilns. I especially love a pearl, aqua, seafoam, etc. Is there a glaze collection (pre mixed, I have not mixed glaze yet) cone 5 that would work for that look in a non gas kiln.?

 

 

2- I love the look of the old blue& stamped salt glaze jugs. Is it a salt glaze with cobolt underglaze design/stamp? What is it that creates that look? Is there a pre mixed way to achieve that look?? (I don't think I am ready to start making my own glazes quite yet)

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OffCenter    82

I have 2 questions

1- love the iredescent glazes, and it seems it is achieved easily in gas kilns. I especially love a pearl, aqua, seafoam, etc. Is there a glaze collection (pre mixed, I have not mixed glaze yet) cone 5 that would work for that look in a non gas kiln.?

 

 

2- I love the look of the old blue& stamped salt glaze jugs. Is it a salt glaze with cobolt underglaze design/stamp? What is it that creates that look? Is there a pre mixed way to achieve that look?? (I don't think I am ready to start making my own glazes quite yet)

 

 

Salt glaze isn't a glaze that comes in a bottle (even though I wouldn't be surprised if there are some commercial fake salt glazes). It is the glaze that forms on pots when you throw salt into a kiln during the firing (Don't try this in your kiln!).... I bet when you start making your own glazes you will want to kick yourself for waiting so long. Find some recipes that you like (say 6 or so good glazes) and note the materials needed to make them. You'll need at least 25 (more is better) pounds of some basic materials like Edgar Plastic Kaolin, Silica, Nepheline Syenite, Whiting, and a few more and very small amounts of the more expensive materials like Cobalt Carbonate, Tin Oxide, Copper Carbonate, Rutile, and a few more. If the studio that went out of business has a triple beam scale, grab it and you'll have a glaze lab.

 

Jim

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neilestrick    1,378

Iridescence is not necessarily due to the gas/reduction firing. It's probably more from the glaze formulation than anything. Depending on what exactly you mean by iridescence, it can come from the presence of titanium in a glaze, or some glazes that have soda ash in them can also give that effect. I also have a couple of glazes that are just really high in silica that do it.

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neilestrick    1,378

Those are probably done with either lusters or fuming techniques. Both are somewhat complicated, and may be best attempted once you get glazing figured out.

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Mark C.    1,796

Those are probably done with either lusters or fuming techniques. Both are somewhat complicated, and may be best attempted once you get glazing figured out.

 

 

I agree with this 1000%

also lusters and fuming can be toxic during the process and you need to take all the precautions. That last pot looks a bit like raku which may be a safer quicker way for you to get this affect.

 

Mark

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