Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Wingnut

Making orchid planters/hangers

Recommended Posts

 New to ceramics and have a few questions.  I currently have been working with ^04 bisque and ^06 glaze and low temp clay.  I have lots of low fire clay and prefer to use up before getting any more. I mainly make large beads for macrame hangers.  I am now making orchid hangers and want to know if the low temp clay unglazed will be a problem.  I prefer for the hanger to hold some moisture much like a clay pot.  I will also be glazing the edges and probably doing a decorative glaze stripe/coloring on the body leaving much of the hanger unglazed.  My concern is low fire vs high .  Pros and cons with any advise is trully appreciated.   I have LOTS (100's) of orchids and wanted to make some different ways to display them.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High fire clay high fired absorbs very little water.  If the orchid requires constant moisture and algae or mold is an issue, then glazing inside or out would help.  My cactus and succulents prefer unglazed inside, I think.  It's a great hobby to make pots specifically for your plants and watch how the different variables cause different growth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most terra cotta planters I have seen are much thicker than my stoneware planters.  Neither one bounces, so strength is only a factor if you're dealing with root bound plants that can provide enough pressure to break the pot.  I don't know orchids, but some succulents can do this.  More to the point of high fire/low fire for planters is the watering schedule considering that the earthenware (terra cotta) will absorb water.  Then you have to consider the other variables of planting media, environmental conditions, planter depth, and plant requirements.  You're on the right track making your own pots if you're a serious plant collector.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bisqueware at any temperature is fragile - whether earthenware or ^5/6 or ^10 claybody. because of its porosity.

i would definitely experiment with earthenware just coz you have so much.

you can use the principle of onggi potters. modern  western ones who  bisque and glaze fire but underfire the glaze and claybody so it remains porous but not as fragile as bisque. 

Could a vitrified earthenware be stronger than a cone 10 body glaze fired to cone 6?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.