Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • Jennifer Harnetty

      Moderators needed!   12/08/2017

      Ceramic Arts Network is looking for two new forum moderators for the Clay and Glaze Chemistry and Equipment Use and Repair sections of the Ceramic Arts Network Community Forum. We are looking for somebody who is an active participant (i.e. somebody who participates on a daily basis, or near daily) on the forum. Moderators must be willing to monitor the forum on a daily basis to remove spam, make sure members are adhering to the Forum Terms of Use, and make sure posts are in the appropriate categories. In addition to moderating their primary sections, Moderators must work as a team with other moderators to monitor the areas of the forum that do not have dedicated moderators (Educational Approaches and Resources, Aesthetic Approaches and Philosophy, etc.). Moderators must have a solid understanding of the area of the forum they are going to moderate (i.e. the Clay and Glaze Chemistry moderator must be somebody who mixes, tests, and has a decent understanding of materials). Moderators must be diplomatic communicators, be receptive to others’ ideas, and be able to see things from multiple perspectives. This is a volunteer position that comes with an honorary annual ICAN Gold membership. If you are interested, please send an email outlining your experience and qualifications to jharnetty@ceramics.org.
kraythe

Glaze Application Questions.

Recommended Posts

Stopping Glaze Drip Beads?

This is probably more of an application question than a chemistry question but I am getting a problem where I have glazes with Specific Gravity around 1.45 that are forming beads of glaze on the rim of cups and other wares when dipping or pouring the glaze I am wondering if there is something I can add to the glaze to stop that. Id hate to thin the glaze further and I don't have the equipment to spray safely.  So I am wondering if anyone can help me out with tips on chemistry, specific gravity or application technique. For dipping I will wax the foot then dip up to the foot for 6 seconds or so then lift the piece out. For pouring I am filling the inside of the piece with glaze then pouring while rotating the rim. 

Removing Tong / Finger Marks? 

When dipping my pots in the glaze I often get marks for where the tongs or fingers were holding the piece and I would like to fill them in a way to not be obvious that they were there. I have tried a small squeeze bottle to drip the glaze but that invariably results in a small bump that doesn't go away in the firing.  Any suggestions of how I can do this without making the marks on the piece? 

Seal over toxic materials with clear?

Another question, if I am using a glaze with cobalt inside a bowl and want to seal it with a non toxic glaze can I apply the clear over the cobalt and fire once and be sure the clear will not mix with the cobalt layer?

Edited by kraythe
Combining questions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Applying glazes takes practice; you should get better over time.  Unfortunately, there may be many pieces made, glazed before you get the technique down.  But I've found that is a learned skill.  As many potters will have as many tricks of the trade they've developed.  You sound like you have the basics (although I'm a three or four second dipper); just make pieces and practice.  The part of potting that most "hate" is glazing, because it doesn't turn out the way you envisioned the glaze.  But you'll get there.

Some glazes are very sensitive to glaze thickness, so even rubbing down a drop on a tong mark or finger mark will leave a trace.  I've use an artists paint brush to dab tong marks,  let it dry, and then smooth it down until it matches the rest of the glaze thickness.  Some leave the marks and let the glaze melt cover them, especially if the glaze tends to move while firing.  Some glazes show those marks more than others.  Spraying leaves no tong marks, but takes longer (and has a good learning curve to get right thickness). 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Another question, if I am using a glaze with cobalt inside a bowl and want to seal it with a non toxic glaze can I apply the clear over the cobalt and fire once and be sure the clear will not mix with the cobalt layer?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nope:-))))

think there are threads here discussing cobalt.

If firing glaze to maturity, and not drinking straight lemon juice from it daily, I think cobalt is fine, bu stand to be corrected.

do a search in the forums.

re glazing, I glaze inside first, if glaze fiddly, you can wax the rim if already glazed, then dip the outside of vessel.

finger marks deal with immediately by dipping finger I glaze and applying to spot, as spot is still damp it wont grab a lot of glaze to make a lump.

tong marks I just rub a bit when dry, jf big tong marks I'd do as for finger marks.

that all being said some glazes are pernickity.

as bciske said keep doing it, you'll develop a deftness.

youtube glazing mugs has some insight into this but doing it better, inside first so don't mar the outside surface.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.